First look at new plan for Philly’s 40th Street Trolley Terminal

The trolley terminal revamp. (Courtesy Andropogon Associates via University City District)

The trolley terminal revamp. (Courtesy Andropogon Associates via University City District)

Philadelphia is getting tantalizingly close to transforming its 40th Street Trolley terminal into an inviting public plaza. Plans to remake the one-acre space have been in the works for about a decade, but things officially got started in 2012 when the University City District (UCD)—a collection of businesses and institutions near the terminal—was awarded a William Penn Foundation planning grant for the project.

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New York City receives $191 million in federal funds for new Staten Island Ferry vessels

East, Sustainability, Transportation
Monday, September 22, 2014
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U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx and NYC Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg. (NYC DOT)

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx and NYC Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg. (NYC DOT)

By 2019, two new Staten Island Ferry vessels should be crisscrossing the New York Harbor. Outside of the Whitehall Ferry Terminal this morning, United States Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx announced that New York City had been awarded a $191 million grant to design and construct these vessels that will be more agile and storm-resilient than what’s in the ferry’s current fleet. These funds will also allow the city to invest in resiliency measures at the ferry’s terminals and at surrounding public transit systems. This federal grant was just one component of the U.S. DOT’s latest round of Sandy-related funding, which provides over $3 billion for resiliency measures for the East Coast’s public transit systems. Roughly 90 percent of this money is allocated for projects in New York State and New Jersey.

Continue reading after the jump.

VIDEO> Repairing and Replacing Two New York City Region Bridges

The New Tappan Zee Bridge. (COURTESY TAPAN ZEE CONTRACTORS)

The New Tappan Zee Bridge. (COURTESY TAPAN ZEE CONTRACTORS)

Bridges. They can be grand and majestic, awe-inspiring symbols of engineering ingenuity, city-defining pieces of infrastructure, and, as you may have heard by now, at serious risk of collapsing. To stop that from happening, engineers basically have two options: repair or replace. Both of those strategies are currently pursued in the New York City region.

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Eavesdrop> The Mean Streets of Suffolk County

City Terrain, East, Eavesdroplet, Transportation
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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Center Drive South in Suffolk County. (Courtesy Google)

Center Drive South in Suffolk County. (Courtesy Google)

Bicycling magazine may have named New York City the nation’s best city for cycling—surprising many from calmer towns—but even more stunning is their selection of the worst place to pedal: nearby Suffolk county. Don’t worry Suf-folks, it’s not strictly personal. You’re way of life is symbolic of our national transportation imbalance. “Really, right now, the worst city is in the suburbs,” said Bicycling’s editor in chief Bill Strickland. “We picked Suffolk to be  emblematic of that.” And urbanists wonder why they get tagged as elitists.

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New round of TIGER Grants goes out to cities and states

The Brooklyn Greenway. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

The Brooklyn Greenway. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

The federal Department of Transportation has issued its latest round of its Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grants for cities and states around the country. The grant program was created in 2009 through President Obama’s economic stimulus package and has since provided $3.5 billion to 270 projects. While the DOT has not officially announced the recipients of these new grants, which total $600 million, multiple politicians have been touting the money heading to their districts. Here are some of the projects we know about so far.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> Norman Foster & Fernando Romero team up to design Mexico City’s new $9.2 billion airport

Mexico City's new airport will aim for a light environmental footprint through natural ventilation and a massive central hub. (foster + partners / FR-EE)

Mexico City’s new airport will aim for a light environmental footprint through natural ventilation and a massive central hub. (foster + partners / FR-EE)

A new international airport for Mexico City won’t just fix the problems of its predecessor—which typically delays planes because the two runways were built too close together—it will be unique in its efficient expansive single enclosure, according to its architects, Foster + Partners and FR-EE.

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Registration extended for the vision42design competition

vision42-nyc

(Courtesy Vision42)

The vision42design competition to rethink and redesign the entire length of New York City’s 42nd Street was launched last April by AN and The Institute for Rational Urban Mobility. Entrants in the competition have the opportunity to not only rethink this important street but transform Manhattan at its core and become a model for major urban thoroughfares worldwide.

 

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Ribbon cut at Philadelphia’s revamped Dilworth Park

Architecture, East, Transportation, Urbanism
Thursday, September 4, 2014
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The ribbon cutting at Dilworth Park. (© OLIN / Sahar Coston-Hardy)

The ribbon cutting at Dilworth Park. (OLIN / Sahar Coston-Hardy)

Earlier today, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter cut the ribbon on Dilworth Park—a new 120,000-square-foot public space next to City Hall. OLIN led the $55 million renovation of the site which now includes an expansive lawn, a café, new trees and seating, and a nearly 12,000-square-foot fountain that converts into an ice skating rink in the winter.

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Report warns of runaway sprawl in Columbus, Ohio

A land-use map projecting suburban sprawl around Columbus, Ohio. (Courtesy Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission, Columbus 2020 and ULI Columbus)

A land-use map projecting suburban sprawl around Columbus, Ohio. (Courtesy Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission, Columbus 2020 and ULI Columbus)

By 2050 the city of Columbus, Ohio and its expanding suburbs could more than triple the city’s footprint, according to a new study examining sprawl around Ohio’s capital.

Continue reading after the jump.

Five new apps put urban planning at your fingertips

oppspace

(Courtesy OpportunitySpace)

In the age of apps, we have seen basic human activities like eating, dating, shopping, and exercising be condensed into simple swipes and clicks. It’s a brave new world and one that has folded-in the complex process of financing, developing, and designing new projects. And in recent years, there has been a batch of new apps designed to help planners, architects, cities, and the general public create more livable cities. Here are a few of those apps that caught AN’s attention. Read More

Grimshaw’s transit-oriented public plaza breaks ground in the Bronx

Fordham Plaza. (Courtesy NYC Department of Transportation)

Fordham Plaza. (Courtesy NYC Department of Transportation)

The New York City Department of Transportation recently broke ground on the second phase of Fordham Plaza’s reconstruction in the Bronx. The revamped space will have all the standard-issue pieces of a New York City pedestrian plaza—the planters, benches, seating, trees, lights, and kiosks—but, ultimately, the plaza represents a significant investment in existing transportation infrastructure.

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Video> How the Bayonne Bridge’s roadway will be lifted 64 feet

East, Transportation, Urbanism
Thursday, August 28, 2014
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The Bayonne Bridge. (Flickr / wallyg)

The Bayonne Bridge. (Flickr / wallyg)

The 82-year-old Bayonne Bridge is getting some work done. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has begun the $1.3 billion process to raise the bridge’s roadway by 64 feet. Why, exactly? Well, to keep up with the times of course.

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