World’s largest solar bridge completed in London

Image Courtesy of Network Rail

Image Courtesy of Network Rail

Work was just finished on the Blackfriars Bridge in London, which is now the largest solar bridge in the world. The renovation of the Victorian-era bridge was part of the larger modernization project for the adjoining Blackfriar’s railway station. The station has been fitted with 4,400 photovoltaic panels, which are expected to reduce the station’s CO2 emissions by an estimated 511 tons (563 tons) per year. Work began in spring 2009 and the station was operationally complete in time for the 2012 Olympics, with the solar array installation complete in March 2013. The full refurbishment of the station is now also complete.

The nearly 20,000-square-feet of new panels are intended to offset about 50% of the station’s energy costs.

More after the jump.

Sustainable Food and Architecture at Santa Barbara Public Market

Santa Barbara Public Market is part of the Alma del Pueblo mixed-use development in downtown Santa Barbara. (Courtesy Urban Developments)

Santa Barbara Public Market is part of the Alma del Pueblo mixed-use development in downtown Santa Barbara. (Courtesy Urban Developments)

London has Borough Market. San Francisco has the Ferry Building. Seattle has Pike Place Market. And now Santa Barbara has the Santa Barbara Public Market. The 19,400 square-foot marketplace, put together by local architecture firms Cearnal Andrulaitis, Sutti Associates, and Sherry & Associates Architects, opened on April 14. It showcases regionally-sourced, artisanal foods in a downtown location. Part of Alma del Pueblo, a mixed-use development that includes additional retail and 37 condominiums, the Public Market is located on the site of a former Vons. “When I bought the land, I knew that I wanted to put a market back,” said developer Marge Cafarelli. “Santa Barbara . . . [has] such rich roots and traditions in agriculture, farming, food, and wine, that it made sense to put something back that made sense in this time. Read More

AIA’s Committee On The Environment Announces 2014′s Top 10 Green Buildings

Arizona State University Student Health Services. ( Bill Timmerman / Courtesy AIA)

Arizona State University Student Health Services. ( Bill Timmerman / Courtesy AIA)

The AIA’s Committee on the Environment (COTE) has announced the winners of its annual sustainability awards program. Now in its 18th year, the COTE awards celebrate green architecture, design, and technology. According to a press release, the winning projects must “make a positive contribution to their communities, improve comfort for building occupants and reduce environmental impacts.”

Each of the ten winners will be officially honored at the AIA’s National Convention and Design Exhibition in Chicago later this year, but, in the meantime, here’s a closer look at the 10 winners.

View the winners after the jump.

Louisville Names Winners in Competition to Creatively Reuse Abandoned Lots Across the City

(dye scape)

(dye scape)

In January Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer implored local designers and developers to propose ideas for 250 of the city’s several thousand vacant lots. Last week they announced four winners, which included gardens of dye plants for local textile production; a Habitat for Humanity–style homeownership program; environmental remediation via lavender fields; and meditation gardens made of recycled materials.

See the winning proposals after the jump.

Heatherwick Studio’s Plan for Bombay Sapphire Distillery Are Wildly Green

heatherwick_laverstoke-mill_db_01

(Courtesy Heatherwick Studio)

Bombay Sapphire is in the process of converting a historic paper mill into a facility for producing their famous gin. Overseeing this transformation is the ever-busy Heatherwick Studio, which has been brought on to renovate the 40 derelict buildings found on the site. Their most drastic intervention to the extant campus comes in the form of a soon-to-opened visitor’s center that was recently awarded a BREEAM ‘outstanding’ rating for sustainability, an international system for ranking green buildings.

More after the jump.

Milwaukee pushes urban agriculture for vacant land

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett is pushing a plan to turn parcels of city-owned vacant land into urban farms and orchards. The HOME GR/OWN program has long been stalled, but received a boost from the Bloomberg Mayors Challenge.

Continue reading after the jump.

Winning Moved to Care Design Brings Mobile Healthcare to Southeast Asia

The winning design. (Courtesy Moved to Care)

The winning design. (Courtesy Moved to Care)

A team of American architects and public health professionals has won an international competition to design a mobile health center for impoverished communities in Southeast Asia. The Moved to Care Design Competition, which received more than 200 entries from around the world, called on designers  “to create an innovative design solution for a relocatable healthcare facility.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Designed in Chicago, Made in China: Blair Kamin, Chicago designers mull Chinese urbanization

Chinese new year flags and lanterns in Shenzhen, the poster-city for rapid urbanization in China. (Flickr / dcmaster)

Chinese new year flags and lanterns in Shenzhen, the poster-city for rapid urbanization in China. (Flickr / dcmaster)

Blair Kamin convened a panel of designers at the Chicago Architecture Foundation last Wednesday for a discussion around themes explored in his recent series “Designed in Chicago, Made in China,” in which the Chicago Tribune architecture critic assessed the effects of that country’s rapid development on urbanism and design. Read More

Rebuild By Design> OMA’s Plans to Protect Coastal New Jersey

Aerial rendering of OMA's plan. (Courtesy OMA)

Aerial rendering of OMA’s plan. (Courtesy OMA)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s OMA‘s plan to protect The Garden State’s coast.

See the plan after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> Waggonner and Ball, unabridged Architecture’s Plan For Bridgeport, CT

The plan for Bridgeport, Connecticut. (Courtesy Waggoner and Ball, unabridged Architecture, Yale, and Arcadis)

The plan for Bridgeport, Connecticut. (Courtesy Waggoner and Ball, unabridged Architecture, Yale, and Arcadis)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s how Waggonner and Ball, unabridged and Yale ARCADIS’ team plans to create a more resilient Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Read More

Rebuild By Design> HR&A’s Commercial Corridor Resiliency Project

Resiliency in Red Hook. (Courtesy HR&A/Cooper Robertson)

Resiliency in Red Hook. (Courtesy HR&A/Cooper Robertson)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s how the team led by HR&A/Cooper Robertson plans to bring resiliency to the East Coast from the Rockaways to Red Hook.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> Sasaki’s Plan To Save the Beaches of the Jersey Shore

The Jersey shore in Sasaki's plan. (Courtesy Sasaki)

The Jersey shore in Sasaki’s plan. (Courtesy Sasaki)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s Sasaki’s plan to save the Jersey shore.

Read More

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