Tour 150 of Chicago’s architectural gems this weekend for free at Open House Chicago

The 190 South LaSalle building was designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee in 1968 as an homage to Burnham & Root’s demolished 1892 Masonic Temple Building. (Eric Allix Rogers)

The 190 South LaSalle building was designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee in 1968 as an homage to Burnham & Root’s demolished 1892 Masonic Temple Building. (Eric Allix Rogers)

Open House Chicago is this weekend, October 18 and 19, when 150 of the city’s architectural gems—both new and old, well-known and obscure, public year-round and off-limits but for now—open their doors to enthusiasts of the built environment, free of charge. Read More

Archtober Building of the Day #15> Red Bull Studios

Architecture, East, Interiors
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
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(Berit Hoff)

Archtober Building of the Day #15
Red Bull Studios
220 West 18th Street
SLAB Architecture/INABA

Jeffrey Inaba didn’t have wings, but guided a big group of Archtober enthusiasts and pick up party goers on a tour of Red Bull Studios in Chelsea. Introduced by Lance Jay Brown, 2014 AIANY President, the former Angelino, via OMA, presented a slick 38,000 square foot music studio/gallery/corporate office that spans all trends. With a psychedelic installation curated by Phong Bui and Rail Curatorial Projects, the public spaces, cleverly planned with acoustics and crowd control in mind, sang out with raucous voices of overstimulation—not INABA’s work.  The planning, though, underlying the funk and festivity was rock solid, creating a diversity of public space, engaging from the street, clear divisions of public and private, and fantastic core toilets.

Continue reading after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day #14> Wieden & Kennedy offices by WORKac

Architecture, East, Interiors
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
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(James Fallarino)

(James Fallarino)

Archtober Building of the Day #14
Wieden & Kennedy
150 Varick Street, 6th Floor
WORKac

Sam Dufaux, associate principal of WORKac, led a full boatload of Archtober enthusiasts through the New York offices of renowned Portland, Oregon–based ad agency Wieden + Kennedy.

Continue reading after the jump.

Meet AN’s 2015 Best Of Design Awards Jury

header_art_900px_final_blog

While architecture and design firms across the country and around the world gear up to register (the deadline is November 3) for The Architect’s Newspaper‘s 2015 Best Of Design Awards, we’d like to take the opportunity to introduce this year’s jury. As with last year, we invited a group of prominent design professionals whose expertise covers the nine categories in which we are giving awards. Collectively, they will lend their broad experience and individual perspectives to what is certain to be the very difficult task of choosing the best of many sterling projects.

Meet the jury after the jump.

PART Studio Plays Peek-a-boo with Plywood

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
PART Studio designed the plywood Peek-a-boo Curtain to behave like fabric. (Courtesy PART Studio)

PART Studio designed the plywood Peek-a-boo Curtain to behave like fabric. (Courtesy PART Studio)

Louisville installation elicits fabric-like behavior from wood.

PART Studio designed and built their plywood Peek-a-boo Curtain in just four days, after a last-minute invitation from Louisville arts and business networking organization I.D.E.A.S. 40203. “We went to a meeting, talked about it, then drove to the plywood store,” recalled principal Nathan Smith. Luckily, the architects were not starting from scratch. Rather, Smith and partner Mark Foxworth seized the opportunity to build a full-scale mock-up of an idea they had been tossing around for some time: a curtain that, though built of wood, would behave like fabric. Staged at FirstBuild, a design and fabrication studio run through a partnership between GE Appliances and Local Motors, the exhibition also gave the designers a chance to explore the space between art and commerce. “With our piece we were looking not only to span the specific interests of the groups involved, but also to consider the relationships between product design, art, and architectural design,” said Smith. Read More

Archtober Building of the Day #3> The New School University Center

Architecture, East, Interiors
Friday, October 3, 2014
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(Eve Dilworth Rosen)

(Eve Dilworth Rosen)

Archtober Building of the Day #3
The New School University Center
65 5th Avenue, New York, NY
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM), the five-story academic building topped with student housing on the southeast corner of Fifth Avenue and 14th Street aggressively embraces its urban setting wearing a vivid zig zag expression of vertical circulation on its sleeve. The AIA New York Chapter held the most recent FitCity conference in its 800-seat auditorium last May. The site was selected for this annual event that brings public health and design professionals together, partly because stairs are the defining element of the structure.

Continue reading after the jump.

Deborah Berke designing interiors at Washington D.C.’s Wardman Tower

Architecture, East, Interiors, News
Wednesday, September 24, 2014
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Deborah Berke.

Deborah Berke.

The historic Wardman Tower in Washington D.C. is getting an interior update courtesy of Deborah Berke. The New York–based architect has been tapped by JBG Companies to update all of the building’s interior spaces and its 32 private residences. According to JBG Companies, the renovation “will pay tribute to the opulence of mid-century Paris while adding an open and contemporary feel to the spaces.” If it wasn’t obvious, that’s code for: Expensive. As in, these condos will be very expensive—priced between $2 million and $8 million. According to the Washington Post, that could make the Wardman condos “the most expensive units ever to hit Washington.”

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Product> Great Dividers: A Roundup of Operable Wall Systems

Design, Interiors, National, Product
Monday, September 8, 2014
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modernus_lama-system

(Courtesy Modernus)

Moveable partitions give structure to open floor plans and adapt to shifting spatial needs. Defining diverse areas large and small, public and private, they have long been utilized in office settings, and are gaining popularity in residential loft developments. Fitted with clear or translucent panels of glass or resin, the walls transmit rather than block natural light.

Continue reading after the jump.

Herringbone Whisky Bar by Taylor and Miller

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Taylor and Miller Architecture and Design crafted a playful patterned interior for former contractor and whisky bar proprietor Steve Owen. (Courtesy Taylor and Miller)

Taylor and Miller Architecture and Design crafted a playful patterned interior for former contractor and whisky bar proprietor Steve Owen. (Courtesy Taylor and Miller)

Owner-built interior explores the transition from two dimensions to three.

For his latest venture, The Montrose in Park Slope, Brooklyn, whisky bar proprietor and former contractor Steve Owen (with partners Michael Ferrie and Alex Wade) wanted a rough, industrial look evocative of an Old World distillery. “He was coming at it sort of from an antique perspective, as a pastiche,” said B. Alex Miller, partner at Taylor and Miller Architecture and Design. “We were thinking of it in a different way.” Taylor and Miller, who had worked with Owen on several projects when he was a practicing contractor, noticed the prevalence of wood herringbone patterning on the walls and floors of the spaces Owen was inspired by. “We’d done some other herringbone studies,” said Miller. “We said, ‘This is something that’s often done in a high-end scenario. Let’s pare it down to the barest of essentials, just do it out of 2-by-4 pine, do it in grain on the walls.'” Read More

Product> Interior Glass: Eight new products and their beautiful special effects

Design, Interiors, National, Product
Thursday, September 4, 2014
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3M_Dichroic_02

(Courtesy 3M Architectural Markets)

Fixed or floating, glass panels can bring color, pattern, texture, and spatial definition to an interior—without impeding the spread of light throughout the space. Used as part of a wayfinding or identity scheme, or simply to introduce a note of artistic distinction, the choices range from traditional cast and mouth-blown design to high-tech fabrications.

Continue reading after the jump.

Product> Door Hardware: A roundup of five modern classics

Design, Interiors, National, Product
Thursday, August 28, 2014
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index-d_b.410_01

(Courtesy Astec)

Door hardware falls into two groups: the seen and the unseen. The former is designed to arrest the eye, while the latter is built to impress with sophisticated functionality and satisfying haptics. Here’s a selection of standout handles, hinges, and tracks for contemporary applications.

b.100
Astec

These load-bearing stainless steel wheels can carry a wood or glass door leaf weighing up to 1,760 pounds. The floor track can be surface- or flush-mounted.

Read More

Product> Kitchens + Baths: The Latest Designs from Europe

1-valcucine-Riciclantica-Acciaio

(Courtesy Valcucine)

At Salon del Mobile, the specialized trade show Eurocucina focuses on innovation in kitchen systems and appliances. This year, trends include a fascination with dark woods and the evolution of wall cabinets from closed boxes to open shelves. On the bathroom front, exhibitors at the Salone del Bagno were promoting unusual finishes and materials for plumbing fixtures and fittings.

Valcucine
Riciclantica Acciaio

Now available with a glass worktop, ultra-thin doors, and a redesigned backsplash panel that facilitates installation around utility lines. Designed by Gabriele Centazzo.

More after the jump.

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