Letter to the Editor> Health Food and Historic Preservation

The Coignet Building in Gowanus, Brooklyn is believed to be the first concrete building in New York City. (David Gallagher / Flickr)

The Coignet Building in Gowanus, Brooklyn is believed to be the first concrete building in New York City. (David Gallagher / Flickr)

[Editor's Note: The following are reader-submitted responses to a pair of articles about the opening of an urban Whole Foods in Gowanus, Brooklyn, “Suburbs Meet City” (AN 03_03.05.2014), and the pending redevelopment of the Coignet Building on the site, “Set in Stone” (AN 03_03.05.2014). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

Thanks for the article (“Suburbs Meet CityAN 03_03.05.2014). About the note at the end referring to the project’s intent—is it possible that what could be a corporate marketing ploy on the front end positively contributes to a vibrant local culture? If consumers keep demanding this type of sensitive response from national corporations, I hope with time this business strategy evolves and matures from just local products and signs that say “Brooklyn” all the way to careful stewardship of a community, i.e. good use of the Coignet Building, etc. Thanks again.

Chris Hoal
Intern Architect
Gresham Smith & Partners

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Gehry & Foster’s Battersea Redesign Seeks to Humanize Viñoly’s Original Masterplan

Battersea_archpaper9

(Courtesy Battersea Power Station)

Despite having first dibs on the project, Rafael Viñoly is being forced to hedge his vision for London’s Battersea Power Station redevelopment under pressure from fellow power players Norman Foster and Frank Gehry. Responsible for guiding “Phase III” of the project, the latter pair have rejected the two large structures Mr. Viñoly had initially envisioned lining a raised pedestrian thoroughfare in favor of five smaller structures in an attempt to “humanize the scale.”

More after the jump.

Valerio Dewalt Train’s 13-Story Hyde Park Development Advances With Changes

An updated design for Vue53 in Chicago's Hyde Park. (Courtesy Valerio Dewalt Train Associates)

An updated design for Vue53 in Chicago’s Hyde Park. (Courtesy Valerio Dewalt Train Associates)

Last year, Mesa Development and the University of Chicago announced they’d planned a 13-story mixed-use development for the western end of Hyde Park’s 53rd Street commercial strip. The massive project drew opposition to its scale and a lawsuit delayed construction—until now.

See how the design has changed after the jump.

Justin Davidson Warns of Looming Shadows at St. John the Divine Development.  Rendering for the site. (Courtesy DNA Info / Emily Frost) New York Magazine’s Justin Davidson has called on Mayor De Blasio to protect the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine from being overshadowed by new apartment towers (massing diagram pictured). The site adjacent to the Cathedral has been cleared and construction seems imminent, but Davidson believes the mayor can get involved to stop the current Handel-designed plans. Instead of two towers, Davidson proposes one taller and more slender tower that’s sited farther from the street, more affordable units, and landmark status for the rest of the property. (Image: Courtesy DNA Info / Emily Frost)

 

Financing Secured for Manhattan’s First Micro-Apartment Development

Architecture, Development, East
Wednesday, April 9, 2014
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My Micro NY to rise in Manhattan. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

My Micro NY to rise in Manhattan. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

One year after nARCHITECTS won a New York City–led competition to design a micro-unit housing development, financing is in place to start construction. The Commercial Observer reports that M&T bank has secured a $10.3 million loan for the project known, which is known as “My Micro NY.” The nine-story building will rise in Kips Bay and contain 55 prefab units—each of which will measure roughly 300-square-feet. Nearly half of these units will rent at below-market rents. The paper reports, “The mini apartments will contain nearly 10-foot ceilings and seven-foot-wide balconies in addition to 16-foot-long overhead loft spaces and full closets.” The apartments are expected to come onto the market next year.

Construction Starts on Massive Mixed-Use Development On the D.C. Waterfront

Aerial Rendering of the Project. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

Aerial Rendering of the Project. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

After  nearly a decade of planning, a $2 billion, three-million-square-foot mixed-use development is underway on Washington D.C.’s Southwest waterfront. In March, construction started on Phase 1 of The Wharf, a project that is being developed by Hoffman-Madison Waterfront and designed by Perkins-Eastman. The new neighborhood will have marinas, green space, entertainment venues, and plenty of retail, residential, and hotel space.

Continue reading after the jump.

On Second Try, Robert Stern’s Proposal for Philly’s American Revolution Museum Approved

Development, East, Newsletter
Monday, April 7, 2014
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Stern's new plan for the museum. (Courtesy NC3D for Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Stern’s new plan for the museum. (Courtesy NC3D for Robert A.M. Stern Architects)

Weeks after the Philly Art Commission slammed Robert Stern’s proposal for the Museum for the American Revolution, he’s back with a new design. And good news for the starchitect—the commission likes it. They really, really like it. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that the new plan was unanimously approved and building permits should be issued in the next few months. Unsurprisingly, Stern‘s altered design does not include the features, which the Commission called “Disneyesque.”

See the old design after the jump.

Barclays Center’s Bald Spot to Get Green-Roof Toupee

The Barclays Center green roof. (Courtesy SHoP Architects)

The Barclays Center green roof. (Courtesy SHoP Architects)

Over one-hundred-thousand-square-feet of sedum will be implanted into the Barclays Center’s massive, logo-emblazoned, bald-spot of a roof. According to the Wall Street Journal, SHoP is designing the green topper for the one billion dollar arena. Plans for a public green space on top of the arena date back over a decade, but were later scrapped due to cost constraints.

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Port Authority Wants New Tower and $400 Million Bus Terminal Annex in Manhattan

The Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Rose Trinh / Flickr)

The Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Rose Trinh / Flickr)

The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey has big plans for Manhattan’s West-side bus terminal. In an attempt to cut congestion on the hell-forsaken crowded streets of Hell’s Kitchen, the authority is planning a $400 million bus annex a few blocks from the main 42nd Street Bus Terminal. And to improve that hell-forsaken battered terminal, they are reportedly resurrecting plans to build a tower on top of it—the funds from which would be used to improve the facility.

Continue reading after the jump.

Holl’s Pricey New Library in Queens Must Tone it Down a Notch

Development, East, News, Newsletter
Friday, April 4, 2014
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Rendering for Hunters Point Community Library. (Courtesy Steven Holl Architects)

Rendering for Hunters Point Community Library. (Courtesy Steven Holl Architects)

Looks like Steven Holl’s impressive design for a new library in Queens, New York costs quite a bit more than expected. DNA Info reported that bids for the 21,000-square-foot project came in about $10-20 million over budget. But that doesn’t mean the project is dead just yet. While the city has nixed a planned geothermal heating and cooling system, is swapping customized interior fixtures for standard ones, and is replacing the aluminum façade with painted concrete, they say the library will stay true to its original design.

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Pittsburgh’s Transformation: The 11 Projects Moving The Steel City Forward

The re-opening of Point State Park. (Courtesy Bridgett Kay / Riverlife)

The re-opening of Point State Park. (Courtesy Bridgett Kay / Riverlife)

From its streets to its rivers to its skyline, Pittsburgh is a city in transformation. The Steel City is diversifying its economy, improving its streetscape and becoming a new hub for the creative class. Business Insider has even declared Pittsburgh to be “The Next Hipster Haven.” But the transformation has meant more than coffee shops, bike-share, and startups—even though that’s certainly playing a part. As the city changes, though, it’s too easy to ask if Pittsburgh is the “Next [Enter City Here].” Because the “Next Pittsburgh” will not be the “Next Austin,” or even the “Next Portland.” It’s shaping up to be something entirely it’s own. Simply put, “The Next Pittsburgh” will be just that.

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Guggenheim to Launch Competition for Helsinki Site

Development, International
Thursday, April 3, 2014
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The site of the planned Guggenheim in Helsinki. (Courtesy The Guggenheim)

The site of the planned Guggenheim in Helsinki. (Ari Wiseman / Courtesy The Guggenheim)

The Guggenheim will launch a competition in early June to design their new branch in Helsinki. Working alongside the Finnish Association of Architects, the Foundation is seeking proposals for a currently vacant site alongside the city’s South Harbor. The competition comes three years after the city expressed interest in a Guggenheim outpost. But, according to the Art Newspaper, despite the competition, a new branch is not certain. The paper reported, “The Guggenheim announced that a decision to go ahead with the project would be taken after the architectural competition is completed.” The competition comes as the Guggenheim faces heated backlash for their planned museum in Abu Dhabi, which has a dismal record on workers’ rights.

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