Christopher Mount to Open Architecture and Design Gallery in Los Angeles

Mies van der Rohe, New National Gallery, Berlin, 1968, photograph by Balthazar Korab. (Courtesy Estate of Balthazar Korab)

Mies van der Rohe, New National Gallery, Berlin, 1968, photograph by Balthazar Korab. (Courtesy Estate of Balthazar Korab)

Having observed the absence of architecture and design materials from the American art collection scene, curator and scholar Christopher W. Mount decided to fill the gap himself. His eponymous Los Angeles gallery, housed in the Pacific Design Center, opens to the public on Friday, May 23 with A Modern Master: Photographs by Balthazar Korab. A second gallery, open by appointment, will be located on the Upper West Side in New York. “I really thought that this was the time,” said Mount. “I thought, ‘Here is a subject matter that major museums collect, and there hasn’t been somebody who opened a gallery.’” Read More

Friday> Freecell & Pulitzer Foundation turn a vacant lot in St. Louis into a parade of public programs

Conceptual rendering of Lots at the PXSTL site  Image. (Freecell Architecture via Pulitzer Foundation)

Conceptual rendering of Lots at the PXSTL site. (Freecell Architecture via Pulitzer Foundation)

Last year, a vacant lot across the street from the Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis became the site of a design competition for a temporary built-environment installation. New York’s Freecell Architecture won PXSTL’s $50,000 project budget and $10,000 honorarium for a proposal to erect an adjustable canopy for performances and gatherings—an idea Kristina Van Dyke, director of the Pulitzer Foundation, called “both monumental and ephemeral at the same time.”

Continue reading after the jump.

The Cinematic Future of “Dumbo Heights”

Dumbo Heights. (Courtesy dumboheights.com via New York Daily News)

Dumbo Heights. (Courtesy dumboheights.com via New York Daily News)

The transformation of the Jehovah’s Witness’ Watchtower campus in Dumbo is underway. Real estate wunderkind Jared Kushner is converting the five-building complex into “Dumbo Heights” – Brooklyn’s next tech hub and commercial district. While the 1.2-million-square-foot project won’t open until next year, a new promotional video for the site was released this week. And it’s packed with more Brooklyn stereotypes than a Williamsburg brunch spot on Sunday. Here’s a shot-by-shot guide to the spring’s most epic real estate promotional film. Read More

Welcome Home, Chicago Design Museum!

Design, Eavesdroplet, Midwest
Thursday, May 1, 2014
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Chuck Anderson's poster for the ChiDM kickstarter campaign. (Courtesy ChiDM)

Chuck Anderson’s poster for the ChiDM kickstarter campaign. (Courtesy ChiDM)

The Chicago Design Museum, our resident pop-up pantheon of graphic aesthetics, is looking for your help to mount the first exhibition in its new permanent home. They’re planning a centennial show for the American Institute of Graphic Arts (hey, AIGA’s as old as Wrigley!), and they’ve launched a Kickstarter campaign to get it funded (and time is really running out!). Eavesdrop’s been known to drop in on ChiDM’s shows since its inception, so we could be persuaded to part with some cash.

Posters by Michael C. Place of Build, Debbie Millman, and Marian Bantjes for the ChiDM kickstarter campaign. (Courtesy ChiDM)

Posters by Michael C. Place of Build, Debbie Millman, and Marian Bantjes for the ChiDM kickstarter campaign. (Courtesy ChiDM)

Preservationists Fight To Save Modernist North Carolina Office Building

Small's modernist marvel. (Courtesy John Morris, goodnightraleigh.com)

Small’s modernist marvel. (Courtesy John Morris, goodnightraleigh.com)

A group of North Carolina preservationists is trying to protect a local piece of modernist history from the impending wrecking ball. The News & Observer reported that a group called North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) has started a campaign to save the former Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic building, which was designed by Raleigh architect G. Milton Small over 50 years ago.

“The building is really Raleigh’s finest example of international architecture,” said George Smart, the head of NCMH, who noted that Small studied under Mies van der Rohe at IIT.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> ‘CHGO DSGN’ probes the past and present of Chicago Design

Art, Design, Midwest, On View
Wednesday, April 30, 2014
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(CHGO DSGN)

(CHGO DSGN)

It looks like design history is in the air here in Chicago. The Chicago Design Museum is in the middle of a Kickstarter campaign to launch an exhibition looking back at 100 years of graphic arts. Chicagoisms just opened at The Art Institute—a meditation on Chicago’s architectural history and mythology that builds off a previous exhibition of unbuilt work reviewed here.

Now another exhibit glances at Chicago’s design history to better assess its present and future.

Continue reading after the jump.

Amid Horse Carriage Debate, Nostalgic New Yorkers Ponder a 21st Century Horseless Carriage

Design, East, News, Transportation
Thursday, April 24, 2014
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The Horseless eCarriage. (Henry Melcher / AN)

The Horseless eCarriage. (Henry Melcher / AN)

In what sounds like a flashback to the turn of the 20th century, curious New Yorkers peered inquisitively at a new horseless carriage model on display at the New York International Auto Show. The old-timey vehicle is actually a high-tech electric vehicle at the center of the heated fight to ban horse carriages from Central Park in New York City.

Continue reading after the jump.

Milan In Review> Interiors & Environments Push the Salone del Mobile Beyond Furniture

CitizenLightIsTime

Light is Time installation for Citizen watches at the Triennale in Milan. (Courtesy Citizen)

It’s easy to get overwhelmed at the Salone del Mobile and the dozens of related events during Milan Design Week. Luckily there are plenty of visual palate cleansers in form of immersive environments, from new showrooms by Pritzker Prize–winning architects to dazzling installations by up-and-coming designers. There is more to Milan Design Week than just great looking furniture! At the Triennale design museum, for instance, Paris-based DGT architects created a light-catching installation for Citizen watches called Light is Time (above), featuring space dividing curtains made of tens of thousands of watch plates.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels’ Not-Yet-Built LEGO Museum Commemorated in LEGO Architecture Series

Design, International, Product
Friday, April 18, 2014
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big-lego-01

Bjarke Ingels’ LEGO-inspired design for the LEGO House in Denmark is now available to build in LEGOs. (Courtesy LEGO)

LEGO Architecture has released a new box set—and from the looks of it, this isn’t your grandmother’s architectural plaything. The new LEGO set is not the usual plastic-brick model of Rockefeller Center or the Empire State Building. No, this new set is cutting-edge. It goes where no other LEGO box set has gone before: it’s a replica of an icon so iconic that it doesn’t even exist yet. It’s a limited-edition replica of the Bjarke Ingels–designed LEGO Museum in the company’s birthplace of Billund, Denmark.

Continue reading after the jump.

Harvard Names Seven Finalists for the 2014 Wheelwright Prize

The Finalists Projects. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

The Finalists Projects. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD) has announced seven finalists for the $100,000 Wheelwright Grant which is awarded annually for travel-based architectural research. This prize was first given in 1935 to purely GSD grads until it was revamped in 2013 to be an open competition.

The 2014 competition received nearly 200 submissions from 46 countries. The jury awarded special commendation to seven individuals for their exceptional design talent and imaginative research proposals. The winner will be announced on April 30th.

See the finalists after the jump.

vision42design Competition Asks Designers to Re-Imagine 42nd Street Without Cars

(Courtesy Vision 42)-2

(Courtesy vision42)

The Institute for Rational Urban Mobility is hosting the just-announced vision42design Competition calling on architects, designers, and transportation gurus to re-imagine one of the most iconic (and congested) streets in New York City—42nd Street. Submit your plans today to transform the street into a world-class boulevard complete with a high-quality public spaces and a light-rail tram. In addition to the $10,000 winner’s prize, the jury’s top selected projects will be featured in The Architect’s Newspaper. For more info and to register visit the competition website. Registration Deadline: Sept 8, 2014 (Midnight) EST

Yeezus! What a Jury! The Living and The Dead at MoMA PS1′s Young Architects Program

Design, East, Eavesdroplet
Thursday, April 10, 2014
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The Living's pavilion, Hy-Fi. (Courtesy The Living)

The Living’s pavilion, Hy-Fi. (Courtesy The Living)

The MoMA PS 1 jury process that selected the “100 percent organic pavilion Hy-Fi” for its 2014 pavilion may have been a contentious group. The museum announced last month that David Benjamin, the principal of Brooklyn-based firm The Living, would design the temporary structure. But several sources have told Eavesdrop that one of the short listed firms (Collective-LOK, PARA-Project, WOJR, over,under, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, LAMAS, Pita + Bloom) was in fact told that it—not Benjamin—had won the design competition.

The story unfolds after the jump…

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