Small Projects Awards honor big things in small packages

Woodland Dune Home (Steve Hall, Hedrich Blessing)

Woodland Dune Home (Steve Hall, Hedrich Blessing)

Big projects command the most media attention, but small works of art and architecture can still make a splash. That’s the ethos of AIA Chicago’s fourth annual Small Projects Awards, which last week named 13 honorees among 96 entries that included Chinatown’s new boathouse, a barn-like complement to Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth house, and an un-built “Safe House” for tornado-ravaged Joplin, Missouri. Read More

AIA’s Committee On The Environment Announces 2014′s Top 10 Green Buildings

Arizona State University Student Health Services. ( Bill Timmerman / Courtesy AIA)

Arizona State University Student Health Services. ( Bill Timmerman / Courtesy AIA)

The AIA’s Committee on the Environment (COTE) has announced the winners of its annual sustainability awards program. Now in its 18th year, the COTE awards celebrate green architecture, design, and technology. According to a press release, the winning projects must “make a positive contribution to their communities, improve comfort for building occupants and reduce environmental impacts.”

Each of the ten winners will be officially honored at the AIA’s National Convention and Design Exhibition in Chicago later this year, but, in the meantime, here’s a closer look at the 10 winners.

View the winners after the jump.

Louisville Names Winners in Competition to Creatively Reuse Abandoned Lots Across the City

(dye scape)

(dye scape)

In January Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer implored local designers and developers to propose ideas for 250 of the city’s several thousand vacant lots. Last week they announced four winners, which included gardens of dye plants for local textile production; a Habitat for Humanity–style homeownership program; environmental remediation via lavender fields; and meditation gardens made of recycled materials.

See the winning proposals after the jump.

Inaugural Isamu Noguchi Awards Go To Norman Foster & Hiroshi Sugimoto

Norman Foster. (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Norman Foster. (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

This week, the Noguchi Museum in Queens, New York announced the inaugural Isamu Noguchi Awards to recognize like-minded spirits who share Noguchi’s commitment to innovation, global consciousness, and Japanese/American exchange. The first recipients of the award are architects Norman Foster and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

 

 

Continue reading after the jump.

3XN Selected to Design Olympic Committee Headquarters in Switzerland

Architecture, Awards, International
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Aerial view of Lausanne. (Wikimedia Commons)

Aerial view of Lausanne. (Wikimedia Commons)

The International Olympic Committee has selected Danish firm 3XN to design their new headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland. The firm beat out Toyo Ito, Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, and OMA to design a new administrative campus for the committee alongside Lake Geneva. ‘The Olympic Movement has many expressions that are about people coming together in the best possible way,”said  Kim Herforth Nielsen, Principal and Creative Director of 3XN, in a statement. “We have designed the new IOC Headquarters as a physical expression of the Olympic Movement and its values expressed through Architecture.”

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Harvard Names Seven Finalists for the 2014 Wheelwright Prize

The Finalists Projects. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

The Finalists Projects. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD) has announced seven finalists for the $100,000 Wheelwright Grant which is awarded annually for travel-based architectural research. This prize was first given in 1935 to purely GSD grads until it was revamped in 2013 to be an open competition.

The 2014 competition received nearly 200 submissions from 46 countries. The jury awarded special commendation to seven individuals for their exceptional design talent and imaginative research proposals. The winner will be announced on April 30th.

See the finalists after the jump.

Winning Moved to Care Design Brings Mobile Healthcare to Southeast Asia

The winning design. (Courtesy Moved to Care)

The winning design. (Courtesy Moved to Care)

A team of American architects and public health professionals has won an international competition to design a mobile health center for impoverished communities in Southeast Asia. The Moved to Care Design Competition, which received more than 200 entries from around the world, called on designers  “to create an innovative design solution for a relocatable healthcare facility.”

Continue reading after the jump.

2014–2015 Rome Prize Winners Announced.  Rome Prize winners announced. (Courtesy American Academy in Rome) The American Academy in Rome has announced the 30 winners of their 118th annual Rome Prize Competition. According to a statement, “Rome Prize recipients are provided with a fellowship, which includes a stipend and live/working space, and are invited to live in Rome for six months to two years to immerse themselves in the Academy community.” The winners in architecture were Firat Erdim and Vincent L. Snyder; and Kim Karlsrud & Daniel Phillips, and Adam Kuby won in landscape design. The full list of winners can be found here.

 

Center for Active Design Announces Winners of Excellence Awards

Awards, East
Thursday, April 10, 2014
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Sephardic Community Center in Brooklyn by BKSK. (Courtesy Jeffrey Totaro)

Sephardic Community Center in Brooklyn by BKSK. (Courtesy Jeffrey Totaro)

The Center for Active Design has announced its first annual Excellence Awards, which recognizes the “role design plays in addressing the ongoing obesity and chronic disease epidemic.” The jury—which included AN’s William Menking—has selected winners out of more than 40 plans for buildings and public spaces that encourage healthy lifestyles. The Center, which was created under Mayor Bloomberg’s Obesity Task Force, will present the awards in New York City on May 19th. For more information on the winners and for tickets to the event, visit the Center’s website.

Behnisch Architekten Greens UB’s School of Law

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The John and Frances Angelos Law Center is on track to achieve LEED Platinum status. (David Matthiessen)

The John and Frances Angelos Law Center is on track to achieve LEED Platinum status. (David Matthiessen)

A high-performance facade weaves a diverse program into a single volume.

The School of Law at the University of Baltimore was founded nearly nine decades ago, but for most of that time its classrooms, offices, library, and clinics were scattered among several downtown buildings. That changed last year, with the opening of the John and Frances Angelos Law Center. Designed by Behnisch Architekten with Ayers Saint Gross, the Angelos Law Center unites a diverse program within a single 12-story structure. Its checkerboard envelope, which won Best Facade in AN’s 2014 Best of Design Awards, weaves the building’s three principal components—a classroom and office wing, the library, and a central atrium—into a single volume. In addition, the facade positions the university on the cutting edge of sustainable design. Its integrated approach to energy efficiency has helped the Angelos Law Center win several green-building prizes, and set it on track to achieve LEED platinum status. Read More

“SuralArk” Selected as Best Folly for Summer Installation at Socrates Sculpture Park

(Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold / Courtesy Architectural League)

(Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold / Courtesy Architectural League)

Socrates Sculpture Park and the Architectural League have selected Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold as the winners of their Folly 2014 competition. Commenced in earlier this year and launched in 2012, the contest’s name and theme derive from the 18th and 19th century Romantic practice of architectural follies, or structures with little discernible function that are typically sited within a garden or landscape. Austin and Mergold’s SuralArk was deemed the most deserving contemporary interpretation of the tradition, and will be erected within the park’s Long Island City confines by early May.

More after the jump.

Pier Carlo Bontempi and Ruan Yisan accept Driehaus awards for classicist architecture and preservation

Place Toscane in Val D'Europe, France by Bontempi.

Place Toscane in Val D’Europe, France by Bontempi.

Italian architect Pier Carlo Bontempi and Chinese preservationist Ruan Yisan last weekend received the highest honors in the world of classicist design—a school of though that AN previously examined alongside the more widely known Pritzker Prize.

The 2014 Richard H. Driehaus Prize went to Bontempi, an architect from Parma, Italy whose work includes a block recovery plan for that city’s historic center, as well as the Place de Toscane and the “Quartier du Lac” resort in Val d’Europe near Paris.

Read More

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