Student’s Puzzle Facade Project Is an Architecturally-Scaled Game

JAVIER LLORET'S PUZZLE FACADE (COURTESY CORE 77)

JAVIER LLORET’S PUZZLE FACADE (COURTESY CORE 77)

In his school project, Puzzle Facade, Spanish designer Javier Lloret decided to transform the exterior of an Austrian museum into an interactive piece of architectural entertainment: a giant Rubik’s Cube. Lloret wirelessly connected a 3D-printed handheld cube to a laptop responsible for controlling colors on the facade of a nearby building roughly shaped like a cube: the Ars Electronica in Linz, Austria. The building proved to be an ideal canvas for the project as it was already furnished with an LED-lit media facade.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> MoMA Presents “Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal”

Art, City Terrain, East, On View, Urbanism
Tuesday, January 28, 2014
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Model of Frank Lloyd Wright's Broadacre City. (Courtesy MoMA)

Model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City. (Courtesy MoMA)

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal
Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street, New York, NY
February 1 to June 1

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal will represent the first exhibit resulting from the recent join acquisition of the architect’s archives by MoMA and Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library. The models, drawings, and films found within the extensive collection will allow the museum to illustrate the tension in Wright’s urban thinking in the 1920s and 30s.

Even as he undertook projects that contributed to the increasingly vertical nature of American cities, he created a radical horizontal vision of urban life known as Broadacre City. The elaborate model of this agrarian metropolis created by Wright and his students will be displayed alongside the architect’s designs for the San Francsico Call Building, Mahattan’s St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie Towers, and a largely theoretical mile-high skyscraper.

Lighting Designers Give New Life To an Abandoned Finnish Silo

Art, Design, International, Newsletter
Thursday, January 23, 2014
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archpaper_silo2

(Courtesy Lighting Design Collective)

Punctured and illuminated, an oil silo on the Helsinki coastline has been recast as a permanent art installation. Silo 468 was commissioned in part to commemorate the city’s 2012 appointment as a World Design Capital. Madrid-based Lighting-Design Collective were brought to the Finish city for the drastic transformation project. Continue reading after the jump

On View> Izhar Patkin: The Wandering Veil at MASS MoCA

Art, East, On View
Monday, January 13, 2014
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(Courtesy MASS MoCA)

(Courtesy MASS MoCA)

Izhar Patkin: The Wandering Veil
MASS MoCA
87 Marshall St., North Adams, MA
Through September 1, 2014

Izhar Patkin: The Wandering Veil is a survey of the Israeli-born, New York-based artist. Grand, labyrinthine, yet intimate, the exhibition occupies the entirety of MASS MoCA’s largest gallery. The works on display are rich with personal narrative, political metaphor, and myth, highlighting the many formal innovations Patkin has pioneered in the course of his 30-year career. The show’s centerpiece is a cycle of spectacular mural-size paintings on tulle fabric that are making their U.S. debut. Entitled “Veiled Threats,” the cycle was inspired by the late Kashmiri-American poet Agha Shahid Ali’s writings on memory, loss, love, and exile. Co-organized by MASS MoCA, The Wandering Veil is coming to Massachusetts from the Tel Aviv Museum of Art and the Tefen Open Museum in Israel, where it premiered last year.

On View> “Tacita Dean: JG” at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles

Art, On View, West
Friday, January 10, 2014
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(Courtesy Hammer Museum)

(Courtesy Hammer Museum)

Tacita Dean: JG
Hammer Museum
10899 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles
Through January 26, 2014

JG, the latest work in film from British-born, Berlin-based artist Tacita Dean, is inspired by her correspondence with British author J.G. Ballard and the connections between his short story, “The Voice of Time,” and Robert Smithson’s landmark earthwork, Spiral Jetty.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> T.J. Wilcox’s “Up in the Air” at the Whitney Through February 9

Art, East, On View
Friday, January 10, 2014
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T. J. Wilcox, still from In the Air, 2013. (Bill Orcutt / Courtesy Metro Pictures)

T. J. Wilcox, still from In the Air, 2013. (Bill Orcutt / Courtesy Metro Pictures)

Up in the Air
Whitney Museum of American Art
Through February 9, 2014

Circles and squares; past and present; inside and outside. These are some of the elements that combine architecture and the moving image in T.J. Wilcox’s Up in the Air, a contemporary cyclorama of his Union Square penthouse studio view installed in Marcel Breuer’s Whitney Museum building.

Continue reading after the jump.

Silent Light Installation Illuminated Sound Pollution in Brooklyn

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Silent Lights at Night (New York City Department of Transportation/Flickr)

First proposed in 2011, Brooklyn’s Silent Light installation has finally become a reality.  Located at the intersection of Park Avenue and Navy Street under the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway (BQE) in Red Hook, the series of gates frames a pedestrian walkway that passes through an area of heavy vehicular traffic. The structures are covered in LED lights activated by surrounding noise from cars to create fleeting light shows of various colors and patterns.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cincinnati Art Museum seeks new director; Aaron Betsky steps down

Art, Midwest, Shft+Alt+Del
Monday, January 6, 2014
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The cincinnati art museum. (Erica Minton via flickr)

The cincinnati art museum. (Erica Minton via flickr)

Aaron Betsky, director of the Cincinnati Art Museum for seven years, announced Thursday he’ll step down.

Cincinnati’s WVXU reported that the museum’s board will set up a search committee, and that Betsky will help pick his successor. Betsky, an architect, oversaw the first phase of a renovation for which he helped raise more $13 million, and increased the art museum’s endowment by 18 percent. His leadership was at times controversial, as when he oversaw an exhibit by artist Todd Pavlisko that included firing a .30-caliber rifle in the 132-year-old museum’s Schmidlapp Gallery.

Read More

Wiscombe Planning Zombie Art Museum?  Wiscombe Planning Zombie Art Museum? Hell Yeah! We hear from a little birdie that our friend Tom Wiscombe (pictured) may be designing a new museum in downtown Los Angeles dedicated to Los Angeles art. The details are still left to resolve, but we’ve been told he likens the place to a “zombie hive.” You had us at zombie, Tom. (Photo: Courtesy Tom Wiscombe Design)

 

Young Love in Times Square

Art, Design, East, Unveiled
Monday, January 6, 2014
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Archpaper01-TSquareheart

A rendering of the folly to be installed in February (Courtesy Times Square Alliance)

Brooklyn-based Young Projects have been announced as the winner of the annual competition to design a Valentine’s Day themed installation in Times Square. Times Square Arts, the wing of the Times Square Alliance responsible for public art programs, worked with the Van Alen Institute to select this year’s design, which will go on display in early February.

Continue reading after the jump.

Zaha Hadid Shapes a Christmas Tree Ornament for Charity

Art, Design, International, Product
Thursday, December 19, 2013
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ornament

(Courtesy ebay)

A Christmas tree ornament designed by Zaha Hadid currently on display in London restaurant aqua shard will be auctioned off for charity at the end of the year. The object hangs amongst 19 other ornaments designed by the “celebrity friends” of Matthew Williamson, a British fashion designer responsible for curating the tree. The proceeds generated by the subsequent sale of the items will go towards British charity Kids Company.

Continue reading after the jump.

Review> The Philadelphia Museum of Art Explores the Art & Architecture of Fernand Léger

Art, East, Review
Wednesday, December 18, 2013
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(Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Fernand Léger’s “The City,” 1919. (Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Fernand Léger is famous for his colorful paintings, many of which feature machine-like forms. He was also at the center of Paris’ avant-garde in the 1920s, not only in painting, but also in graphics, set and costume design, film-making, and architecture.

That is the thesis of Anna Vallye, curator of this fall’s major exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Léger: Modern Art and the Metropolis, inspired by the museum’s Léger masterpiece, the monumental 1919 painting, “The City.”

Continue reading after the jump.

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