Canstruction LA: The City’s Most Architectural Food Drive Has a Record Year

Art, Design, Newsletter, West
Tuesday, April 1, 2014
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"FOOD FIGHT!" by PCL Construction Services, Inc., KPFF Consulting Engineers, and Callison won Jurors' Favorite at Canstruction LA 2014. (Benjamin Ariff Photography)

“FOOD FIGHT!” by PCL Construction Services, Inc., KPFF Consulting Engineers, and Callison won Jurors’ Favorite at Canstruction LA 2014. (Benjamin Ariff Photography)

Every year at about this time, Los Angeles’ design community comes together for a good cause—and a chance to show off their ingenuity working with an unusual building material. We’re talking Canstruction LA, which just wrapped its eighth outing. Like other Canstruction events nationwide, Canstruction LA invites teams of architects, engineers, builders, and designers to design and build sculptures entirely out of canned food. The 2014 competition produced an array of impressive designs and—most importantly—donated 28,551 cans of food to the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank.

More after the jump.

On View> Doug Wheeler’s Light Installation Shines at David Zwirner Gallery Through April 5

Art, East, Lighting, Newsletter, On View
Monday, March 31, 2014
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(Courtesy David Zwirner Gallery)

(Courtesy David Zwirner Gallery)

Doug Wheeler
David Zwirner Gallery
537 West 20th Street, New York
Entry limited to 6 people at a time
Reservations to view the exhibition are available, 212-517-8677
Through April 5, 2014

When you enter the immersive Doug Wheeler installation at David Zwirner Gallery, it’s like daybreak. A domed space with a flat apex meets the horizon with a hidden line of LEDs that shed light in a gradual, two-minute cycle in what the artist calls a “rotational horizon work.” The effect is like looking into a clear blue sky, that on closer inspection has subtle gradations that change as the earth revolves. The floor is the same color and is coped so you are slightly off balance as you advance and retreat towards this unreachable horizon.

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On View> Princeton Art Museum presents “Edvard Munch: Symbolism in Print”

Art, East, On View
Friday, March 28, 2014
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(Courtesy Princeton University Art Museum)

(Courtesy Princeton University Art Museum)

Edvard Munch: Symbolism in Print
Princeton University Art Museum
McCormick Hall, Princeton, NJ
Through June 8

Edvard Munch is best known for his 1893 painting The Scream. Like the majority of his work, this piece deals with psychological themes that were mainstays of late nineteenth century symbolist art, which greatly influenced German Expressionism. The symbols that Munch used contain universal meanings, but also meanings specific to his life.

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Where is that Sculpture? Oyler Wu’s “Cube” Adrift Somewhere in China

Art, Design, Eavesdroplet, West
Wednesday, March 26, 2014
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(Courtesy Oyler Wu)

(Courtesy Oyler Wu)

One of our favorite duos, Oyler Wu, recently completed its biggest installation to date: The Cube, a twisting, glowing steel and wire concoction for the 2013 Beijing Biennale. The dramatic project is now touring China, but when pressed for the latest news the firm admitted that it is not sure where it is. So if you spot a giant cube somewhere in the country, please give them a ring, will you?

On View> The Graham Foundation presents “Chromatic Patterns” through April 5

Art, Interiors, Midwest, On View
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
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(Courtesy Graham Foundation)

(Courtesy Graham Foundation)

Chromatic Patterns
Graham Foundation
4 West Burton Place
Chicago, IL
Through April 5

Judy Ledgerwood’s Chromatic Patterns is a site-specific work that transforms the lower galleries of the Graham Foundation’s historic Madlener House in Chicago. The house was designed by Richard E. Schmidt and Hugh M. G. Garden and built in 1901–02. Judy Ledgerwood is a Chicago-based painter and educator. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Award, an Artadia Award, a Tiffany Award in the Visual Arts, a National Endowment for the Arts Award, and an Illinois Art Council Award. This exhibition surrounds the visitor in vibrant colors with a vibrant floral motif that almost mimics the house’s prairie style ornamentation. This installation examines the effect of paint on architecture, specifically the wall covering’s ability to produce new effects and feelings about a space. In this work, Ledgerwood uses ornamentation to change visitors’ perception of the ornamentation in the Madlener House’s lower galleries, highlighting the divergent ways that pattern, color, ornamentation, and surface have been coded, gendered, repressed, and embraced in art and architecture.

On View> “Focus: Fred Tomaselli” at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth ends Sunday

Art, On View, Southwest
Friday, March 21, 2014
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(Courtesy Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth)

(Courtesy Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth)

FOCUS: Fred Tomaselli
Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth
3200 Darnell Street, Fort Worth
Through March 23, 2014

FOCUS: Fred Tomaselli highlights works created by the artist in the past ten years, including his New York Times collages. Tomaselli is known for his work on wood panels where he combines unorthodox materials that are suspended in a thick layer of clear, epoxy resin. The materials used in these pieces range from field guides to marijuana leaves. In Tomaselli’s hands, they form a hybrid of subjects and cultural references. The artist tries to represent the transcendental and utopian capabilities available within art. His work comments on suburbia in the 1960s and 70s and the quest for escapism. The images that are depicted relate to his California upbringing during those decades. Of his work, Tomaselli said, “It is my ultimate aim to seduce and transport the viewer into the space of these pictures while simultaneously revealing the mechanics of that seduction.”

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UT Student Installation Takes SXSW

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Undergraduates at UT designed Caret 6 as a backdrop for TEX-FAB's annual competition exhibition. (Casey Dunn)

Undergraduates at UT designed Caret 6 as a backdrop for TEX-FAB’s annual competition exhibition. (Casey Dunn)

A room-filling parametric design makes its way from the classroom to Austin’s famous music festival.

When Kory Bieg and his students at The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture began working on Caret 6, they had no idea that it would wind up at this year’s South by Southwest (SXSW) music and arts festival. But the rippling, room-filling installation soon took on a life of its own. Within months, Bieg’s undergraduates—who had little previous exposure to digital design—had designed and fabricated Caret 6, and assembled and disassembled it twice, first at the TEX-FAB SKIN: Digital Assemblies Symposium in February, and then at Austin’s most famous annual gathering in March. Read More

Help Imagine a “Past Whose Future Never Arrived” with Imaginary Archive in Kiev

Art, International
Thursday, March 20, 2014
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Imaginary Archive installation.  (Courtesy  Imaginary Archive Kickstarter)

Imaginary Archive installation. (Courtesy Imaginary Archive Kickstarter)

Since 2010, New York–based artists and theorists Gregory Sholette and Olga Kopenkina have invited people around the world to imagine “a past whose future never arrived.” Through their ambitious installation, Imaginary Archive, participants can interact with both real and fictional “printed matter, small objects, artist’s books and self-published narratives” to envision alternative political and cultural histories.

Continue reading after the jump.

Memory Wounded: How Norway is Remembering the Utøya Massacre

A model of the architectural wound that will be inflicted upon the Sørbråten peninsula. (Courtesy Jonas Dahlberg Studio)

A model of the architectural wound that will be inflicted upon the Sørbråten peninsula. (Courtesy Jonas Dahlberg Studio)

It has been close to three years since a gunman detonated a bomb in Oslo and then stormed a small summer camp off the coast of Norway, killing 77 people and cementing a record as the worst mass shooting in modern memory. The Swedish artist Jonas Dahlberg recently won a competition, Memorial Sites After 22 July, to create an official memorial at the sites of the 2011 Norwegian massacres.

Continue reading after the jump.

An Impossible Stair by NEXT Architects

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Sander Meisner_03

The steel staircase is based on a Möbius strip. (Sander Meisner)

A folly in a Rotterdam suburb draws on residents’ complex relationship with the city.

The residents of Carnisselande, a garden suburb in Barendrecht, the Netherlands, have a curious relationship with Rotterdam. Many of them work in the city, or are otherwise mentally and emotionally connected to it, yet they go home at night to a place that is physically and visually separate. When NEXT architects was tapped to build a folly on a hill in the new town, they seized on this apparent contradiction. “This suburb is completely hidden behind sound barriers, highways, totally disconnected from Rotterdam,” said NEXT director Marijn Schenk. “We discovered when you’re on top of the hill and jump, you can see Rotterdam. We said, ‘Can we make the jump into an art piece?’” Read More

New Installation at JFK’s Terminal 4 Floats Weightlessly in Air

Art, East
Thursday, March 13, 2014
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"Outside Time" at JFK. (Courtesy Dimitar Lukanov Studio)

Outside Time at JFK. (Courtesy Dimitar Lukanov Studio)

An impressive new installation at JFK’s Terminal 4 should make air travel slightly less frustrating, or at least more interesting, for passengers. In late February, Bulgarian-born artist Dimitar Lukanov unveiled Outside Time, a soaring sculpture made of steel and aluminum tubes. Despite weighing-in at 4,600 pounds, the piece manages to appear weightless as it elegantly drifts upwards like a densely-packed school of fish.

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Bye-Bye Art Barn: Rice University to Demolish Martel Center Building

Art, Eavesdroplet, Southwest
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
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(Courtesy Glasscock School of Continuing Studies at Rice)

(Courtesy Glasscock School of Continuing Studies at Rice)

Texas art website Glasstire.com has confirmed the rumor that Rice University intends to demolish the Martel Center building—more informally known as the Art Barn. The corrugated metal structure was commissioned by John and Dominique de Menil in 1969 to house the Rice Museum, a predecessor of The Menil Collection.

The utilitarian structure inspired the “tin house” movement that gained some momentum in Houston’s West End neighborhood in the 1970s.

Continue reading after the jump.

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