Cooper-Hewitt Names Brooke Hodge Deputy Director

Art, Design, East, Shft+Alt+Del
Thursday, May 29, 2014
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Brooke Hodge (courtesy Cooper-Hewitt)

Brooke Hodge (courtesy Cooper-Hewitt)

As the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum gears up for its reopening later this year, the museum announced today it has hired Brooke Hodge, a widely respected curator and museum administrator, as its new deputy director.

Hodge is currently the director of exhibitions and publications at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. She was previously the architecture and design curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles, where she organized shows on Frank Gehry, the automobile designer J Mays, and Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture. She was let go from MOCA amid financial and organizational disruptions at that museum, which lead to several changes in leadership and the near closure of the museum. Hodge is currently working on an exhibition of Thomas Heatherwick, which will open at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas in September.

“Brooke will be diving into preparations for our opening later this fall, while partnering with me and museum teams on the exciting, future plans for the nation’s design museum,” Caroline Baumann, director of the Cooper-Hewitt, said in a statement.

On View> Dan Graham’s Rooftop Pavilion at the Metropolitan Museum Reflects on Public Space

(Courtesy Metropolitan Museum)

(Courtesy Metropolitan Museum)

Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout
Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 5th Avenue, New York
Through November 2. 2014

One of the great gifts bestowed on New York in the summer is the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s roof garden. You are thrust into Olmsted’s Central Park from a promontory surrounded by the perimeter skyline on all sides. The trick with the rooftop art commissions is to play with the space, the views, and the interrelationships between the two. The goal is to make the viewer see them differently—you want to feel like the rooftop is your personal terrace in the sky while sharing it with others in a magnificent secret shared space.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Chicago’s School of the Art Institute taps Jonathan Solomon as head of architecture

Jonathan D. Solomon. (Courtesy Solomon)

Jonathan D. Solomon. (Courtesy Solomon)

Chicago’s top art school announced big changes in its design department this morning.

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Thursday announced their selection of Jonathan Solomon as the new Director of the Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects (AIADO). Solomon, who comes from his position as associate professor and associate dean at the School of Architecture at Syracuse University, assumes the job officially on August 1.

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Artist Paul Tuller Gives Starchitects the Royal Treatment with “Architecture As Crown” Series

(Courtesy Paul Tuller)

(Courtesy Paul Tuller)

Brooklyn-based illustrator Paul Tuller was inspired to create a new poster-portrait series, Architecture As Crown, by his architect boyfriend. This series features illustrations of famous architect’s wearing their most famous works on their heads. Beginning as a parody of Andy Warhol‘s God Save the Queen, the project includes such figures as Peter Eisenman wearing House I as a crown. Purchase your own posters here.

View the starchitects in hats after the jump.

Pictorial> Art Installation Transforms Philly’s Amtrak Corridor With Vibrant Color

The Drama Wall. (Courtesy Mural Arts Program)

The Drama Wall. (Courtesy Mural Arts Program)

An art installation along Philadelphia’s Northeast Amtrak corridor is adding some color to the travel experience for 34,000 daily riders. Berlin-based artist Katharina Grosse has been commissioned by the city’s Mural Arts Program to transform seven sites alongside the tracks with vibrant (and environmentally friendly) coats of paint: Orange and white streak across a warehouse, green and white do the same on an abandoned brick structure, and hot pink cover brush and boulders.

Continue reading after the jump.

Zaha Hadid’s Los Angeles Opera Set Completes Mozart Trilogy

Architecture, Art, On View, West
Wednesday, May 28, 2014
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Hadid's set for Cosi fan tutee. (Mathew Imaging)

Hadid’s set for Cosi fan tutee. (Mathew Imaging)

The Los Angeles Philharmonic has a thing for star architects. As part of a trilogy of Mozart operas directed by Gustavo Dudamel (himself a global celebrity), in 2012  Frank Gehry designed the set for Don Giovanni, in 2013 Jean Nouvel designed one for The Marriage of Figaro, and this month Zaha Hadid Architects has designed the backdrop for Così fan tutee, the trilogy’s finale.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> “Soto: The Houston Penetrable” Suspends 24,000 Tubes in Kinetic Display

Art, Interiors, On View, Southwest
Wednesday, May 28, 2014
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(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Houston)

(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Houston)

Soto: The Houston Penetrable
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
1001 Bissonnet
Through September 1, 2014

The final installation in Jesús Rafael Soto’s Penetrables series—Houston Penetrable—will be on view at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, as of May 8. An interactive display of 24,000 PVC tubes, each hand painted and tied, will hang from the second story of the museum’s Cullinan Hall.

More after the jump.

Blue Plate Special: Bjarke Ingles Reinterprets Walter Gropius With “Big Cities” Dinnerware

(Courtesy BIG + KILO / Rosenthal)

(Courtesy BIG + KILO / Rosenthal)

In 1969, Walter Gropius designed a collection of china for Rosenthal. Named after his atelier in Cambridge, The Architects Collaborative, TAC’s elegant and curious forms are pristine in white porcelain. Embellishing Gropius’ design would naturally be heresy to some purists. To others, it would reflect his belief in the collaborative process. In their update of the tableware, called TAC Big Cities, architect Bjarke Ingels of BIG and Danish industrial design studio Kilo teamed up to create an urban motif for the collection.

Read More

On View> Beyond Craft at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston

Art, On View, Southwest
Tuesday, May 20, 2014
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(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts Houston)

(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts Houston)

Beyond Craft
Museum of Fine Arts Houston
1001 Bissonnet, Houston
Through May 26

The Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection is one of the most remarkable decorative arts collections in the world, and goes a long way toward challenging the idea that there is a difference between decorative and high art. Although primarily American in scope, it also encompasses significant pieces by acclaimed international artists.

More info after the jump.

Shields back on Milwaukee Art Museum overhaul, new designs unveiled

01-milwaukee-art-museum02-milwaukee-art-museum

 

The Milwaukee Art Museum revamp’s previous design and current iteration. (Courtesy HGA Architects & Engineers)

The Milwaukee Art Museum’s long-planned expansion and renovation has become somewhat of a saga.

Plans for a new addition with an entrance along Lake Michigan were announced in 2012, but hit a snag when HGA Architects and Engineers’ Jim Shields walked off the job in February. In April Urban Milwaukee first broke news that Shields, somewhat of a local design celebrity, had left the project amid quibbling over the design. Read More

“Urban Ballet” of Reclaimed Chairs Comes to Times Square This Weekend

Art, City Terrain, East, Urbanism
Friday, May 16, 2014
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Chairs like these will be on display in Times Square. (Courtesy

Chairs like these will be on display in Times Square. (Courtesy

This weekend, design firm Bade Stageberg Cox will transform Times Square with the help of nearly 50 reclaimed chairs painted taxicab yellow. The chairs will be arranged like theater seats and Times Square will be the stage. “As the plaza is occupied throughout the day, the chairs’ movement and rearrangement becomes a performance about the ways in which people inhabit the public realm and shape it to suit their needs,” said the firm in a statement. The installation is part of their Street Theater series, and coincides with New York City Design Week.

Christopher Mount to Open Architecture and Design Gallery in Los Angeles

Mies van der Rohe, New National Gallery, Berlin, 1968, photograph by Balthazar Korab. (Courtesy Estate of Balthazar Korab)

Mies van der Rohe, New National Gallery, Berlin, 1968, photograph by Balthazar Korab. (Courtesy Estate of Balthazar Korab)

Having observed the absence of architecture and design materials from the American art collection scene, curator and scholar Christopher W. Mount decided to fill the gap himself. His eponymous Los Angeles gallery, housed in the Pacific Design Center, opens to the public on Friday, May 23 with A Modern Master: Photographs by Balthazar Korab. A second gallery, open by appointment, will be located on the Upper West Side in New York. “I really thought that this was the time,” said Mount. “I thought, ‘Here is a subject matter that major museums collect, and there hasn’t been somebody who opened a gallery.’” Read More

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