Oakland A’s Exploring New Stadium

Architecture, West
Wednesday, August 13, 2014
.
Oakland County Coliseum (Oakland A's)

Oakland County Coliseum (Oakland A’s)

The Oakland A’s are the best team in baseball this year. Maybe that’s why they’re considering a move from one of the sport’s most outdated stadiums, the Oakland County Coliseum (AKA the Overstock.com Coliseum). According to the San Francisco Chronicle, A’s owner Lew Wolff has begun talks with an architect to build a stadium at the Coliseum site. The team just signed a 10-year contract with the Oakland Coliseum board to stay on the site at least through 2018.  Read More

Lake|Flato Beats the Heat at ASU

Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
Lake|Flato replaced an inefficient one-story wing with a two-story volume wrapped in a high-performance facade. (Bill Timmerman)

Lake|Flato replaced an inefficient one-story wing with a two-story volume wrapped in a high-performance facade. (Bill Timmerman)

LEED Platinum renovation reconnects the Health Services Building to the campus core.

Early in their renovation of the Arizona State University Health Services Building, Lake|Flato Architects, working with orcutt | winslow, decided to scrap the university’s initial concept in favor of a plan that would reengage the campus’s historic pedestrian corridor, the Palm Walk. Instead of building an addition to the north side of the existing facility, which included a serviceable two-story building constructed in the 1950s and another structure Lake|Flato partner Andrew Herdeg described as “a rambling one-story rabbit warren of spaces,” the architects elected to demolish the one-story wing and build a two-story addition in its place. “This initial idea that we need to look at the basic concept before we start the design, and think about it from the campus design perspective, changed everything,” said Herdeg. It allowed the design team to reduce the program by about 12 percent and reduce the footprint by 20 percent, as well as to preserve 5,000 square feet of green space for programs and stormwater mitigation. But it also presented a challenge. The renovated building’s primary identity would be on the east facade of the building, where the desert sun had the potential to undo efficiencies gained elsewhere.
Read More

Amale Andraos named dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation

Amale-Andraos

Amale Andraos.

Amale Andraos, principal of New York–based architecture firm WORKac, has been named dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation (GSAPP), succeeding Mark Wigley. Currently on faculty at GSAPP, she has also taught at Princeton, Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, and the American University in Beirut.

“Columbia is just an incredibly exciting place that’s always been on the forefront of the profession,” Andraos told AN. “It’s an incredibly diverse and experimental place. I want to maintain and expand its role as a think tank for global practice.”

Read More

Arquitectonica to replace OMA at Miami Convention Center redevelopment

Architecture, East, News, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 12, 2014
.
What could have been - OMA's plan for Miami Convention Center. (Courtesy OMA)

What could have been – OMA’s plan for Miami Convention Center. (Courtesy OMA)

Some of the most exciting renderings of the past few years came out of the epic face-off between teacher and student for Miami’s convention center. We’re of course referring to bids by Rem Koolhaas’ OMA and the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) to radically expand and  transform the facility. While it looked like a pretty evenly-matched fight, Rem ultimately won-out with a dramatic transformation of the site. But it was only a matter of time until project accountants and fiscally conservative politicians made it clear that Rem’s billion dollar plans were not going to be realized.

Continue reading after the jump.

Detroit’s infamous theater-turned-parking garage sold at auction

Detroit's crumbling Michigan Theatre has fallen into disrepair since its 1926 construction. (Hermann Schleicher-Roevenstrunck via Flickr)

Detroit’s Michigan Theatre has fallen into disrepair since its 1926 construction. (Hermann Schleicher-Roevenstrunck via Flickr)

Detroit’s Michigan Theatre remains iconic, but not for the reasons that made it so during its early 20th century heyday. Now the opulent 1926 concert hall holds parked cars instead of theater-goers. Will it remain a symbol of Detroit’s struggle to recover from long-term disinvestment, or could it become emblematic of the city’s resilience?

Read More

Opppenheim’s Manhattan bridged towers that might have been

514 11th Avenue (Courtesy Oppenheim Architecture + Design)

514 11th Avenue (Courtesy Oppenheim Architecture + Design)

Silverstein Properties is developing a 1,100-foot-tall development on Manhattan’s West Side, but it won’t be Oppenheim Architecture + Design‘s proposal for a pair of towers linked by a mammoth greenhouse-topped bridge seen here. The scheme was revealed earlier this year as two speculative mixed-use towers comprising some 1.6 million square feet. Then called 514 Eleventh Avenue, the scheme would have stood eye to eye with the Empire State Building.

Continue reading after the jump.

George Lucas replaces Modernist masterpiece with Cape Cod on a California Beach

Architecture, Eavesdroplet, West
Monday, August 11, 2014
.
Lucas's new house (Tom Marble)

Lucas’s new house (Tom Marble)

George Lucas is making architectural waves again. And it has nothing to do with a museum. In 2012 AN reported that Lucas had torn down 3389 Padaro Lane, a 1981 Modernist masterpiece on the beach by sculptor and architect Sherrill Broudy in Carpinteria, just east of Santa Barbara. Now he’s finished the replacement—designed by Appleton & Associates. And let’s just say it’s less of a masterpiece.

Continue reading after the jump.

Detroit “Reanimate the Ruins” Ideas Competition Tackles Historic Packard Automotive Plant

1st-Place-2

The competition winning proposal, Cross the Plant, by Vincent Lavergne.

In 2009, vandals pushed a dump truck through a hole in the wall on the fourth story of the abandoned Packard Automotive Plant in Detroit. (Of course there’s a video.) It’s a level of dereliction and decay that’s frankly common to North America’s foremost basket-case city, but it’s made a bit more poignant by the fact that the plant (built in 1907 and closed in the late ’90s) was once an icon of Detroit’s command over automotive technology and the automotive industry. The 3.5-million-square-foot facility was designed by Albert Kahn to produce luxury cars, and was the first of its type to use a reinforced concrete structure.

But now it’s time for some more creative thinking about how to use the Packard site.

Product> Grand Openings: Window Walls and Doors That Bring the Outside In

Architecture, National, Product
Monday, August 11, 2014
.
sky-frame_arc_1

(Courtesy Sky-Frame)

Even in four-season climates, the allure of outdoor living endures. Meticulously engineered for ease of operation, structural soundness, and weather-tightness, large-scale openings offer a seamless transition between indoors and out. Sliding, telescoping, or rising mechanisms give designers—and their clients—a choice of access that complements their architecture.

Arc
Sky-Frame

This sliding curved window can be double- or triple-glazed. Multiple curves can be combined, or integrated with straight runs.

More after the jump.

Gehry and (fer) Making Their Mark In Watts

Architecture, News, West
Friday, August 8, 2014
.
Frank Gehry (Bustler)

Frank Gehry (Bustler)

We like to give Frank Gehry a hard time for his foibles, but he has actually undertaken a lot of pro bono work, including a Make It Right home in New Orleans and the Pasadena Playhouse and Jazz Bakery Theater in Los Angeles. His latest effort is in one of the most troubled neighborhoods in Los Angeles: Watts. Gehry Partners has agreed to design a new campus for the Childrens Institute (CII), a social services non-profit. They’re collaborating with Inglewood firm (fer) Studio, who will be Executive Architect.

Read More

Marks Barfield Architects building 530-foot-tall observation tower in Brighton, England

Screen Shot 2014-08-05 at 4.41.44 PM

i360 Brighton. (Courtesy Marks Barfield Architects)

The husband-and-wife team behind the London Eye observation wheel plans to one-up themselves with an observation tower in Brighton, UK that’s about 100 feet taller. For the seaside town, David Marks and Julia Barfield of Marks Barfield Architects have created Brighton i360, a 531-foot-tall, futuristic-structure that lifts visitors up high above the English Channel.

Read More

Page Floats a Cedar Sunshade in Albuquerque

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Page designed a simple cedar and steel-wire screen to shade the courtyard of the new GSA building in New Mexico. (Patrick Coulie)

Page designed a simple cedar and steel-wire screen to shade the courtyard of the new GSA building in New Mexico. (Patrick Coulie)

Minimalist catenary canopy lends warmth and lightness to office courtyard.

When Page design principal Larry Speck suggested a catenary sunshade for the courtyard of the new GSA building in Albuquerque, his colleagues set about identifying precedents. “There were some really great devices that we looked at, but a lot were done in the 1960s out of heavy, monumental materials,” said principal Talmadge Smith. “We wondered if there was a way to do it in a lighter, more delicate way that would also introduce some warmth to the space.” The architects elected to build the structure out of western red cedar, which performs particularly well in arid climates. Comprising 4-, 8-, and 12-foot boards suspended on steel cables, the sunshade appears as a wave of blonde wood floating in mid-air, casting slatted shadows on the glass walls of the courtyard.
Read More

Page 3 of 2612345...1020...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License