An Impossible Stair by NEXT Architects

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The steel staircase is based on a Möbius strip. (Sander Meisner)

A folly in a Rotterdam suburb draws on residents’ complex relationship with the city.

The residents of Carnisselande, a garden suburb in Barendrecht, the Netherlands, have a curious relationship with Rotterdam. Many of them work in the city, or are otherwise mentally and emotionally connected to it, yet they go home at night to a place that is physically and visually separate. When NEXT architects was tapped to build a folly on a hill in the new town, they seized on this apparent contradiction. “This suburb is completely hidden behind sound barriers, highways, totally disconnected from Rotterdam,” said NEXT director Marijn Schenk. “We discovered when you’re on top of the hill and jump, you can see Rotterdam. We said, ‘Can we make the jump into an art piece?’” Read More

Chilean architect Smiljan Radic wins 2014 Serpentine Pavilion

Radic's 2014 Pavilion. (Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

Radic’s 2014 Pavilion. (Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

Chilean architect Smiljan Radic has been selected to design the 2014 Serpentine Pavilion in Kensington Gardens, England. Radic is one of the youngest and least-known architects to receive this prestigious honor since it was first awarded 14 years ago. Plans for his pavilion show an expressive, cloud-like structure that will glow at night. The space will also include a cafe, and on some summer nights it will become a stage for art, poetry, music, and film.

According to Serpentine Galleries, the structure’s translucent shell will “house an interior organised around an empty patio, from where the natural setting will appear lower, giving the sensation that the entire volume is floating. At night, thanks to the semi-transparency of the shell, the amber tinted light will attract the attention of passers-by like lamps attracting moths.” The pavilion will be open from June 26t to October 19th.

Eiffel Tower’s New “First Floor” Almost Complete

Architecture, International
Thursday, March 13, 2014
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Work is almost finished on a revamped viewing platform and event space at the Eiffel Tower. While it’s called the First Floor, it’s nearly 200 feet above ground and will offer panoramic views of Paris. And for the braver visitors, it will offer views straight down as the new space has a glass-floor viewing platform. Moatti-Rivière Architects is heading up the renovation, which will include shops, restaurants, conference rooms and event spaces. The new floor will also be better suited to those with disabilities and incorporate green technologies including solar panels and the rainwater collection.

A Desert Oasis by assemblageSTUDIO

Architecture, Envelope, West
Wednesday, March 12, 2014
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tresARCA's facade reflects the colors and textures of its desert environment. (Bill Timmerman)

tresARCA’s facade reflects the colors and textures of its desert environment. (Bill Timmerman)

Capped by a protective steel mesh screen, tresARCA house is built for indoor/outdoor living.

There are two ways to live with Las Vegas’ harsh climate. The first, epitomized by the hermetically-sealed tract houses ringing the Strip, rejects the reality of the desert in favor of air conditioning and architecture evoking far-off places. The second strategy embraces the environment for what it is, and looks to the natural world for cues about how to adapt. In their tresARCA house, assemblageSTUDIO took the latter approach. Glass and granite punctuated by a folded steel screen surrounding the second-floor bedrooms, tresARCA’s facade is a meditation on the resilience of the desert landscape. Read More

Origami Architecture: Make’s Portable Pop-Up Kiosks Fold Metal Like Paper

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Make Architects' kiosks fold open and shut. (Courtesy Make Architects)

Make Architects’ kiosks fold open and shut. (Courtesy Make Architects)

Inspired by Japanese paper-folding, Canary Wharf booths make a sculptural statement whether open or shut.

Make Architects’ folding kiosks for Canary Wharf in London bring new meaning to the term “pop-up shop.” The bellows-like structures were inspired by Japanese paper folding. “[The kiosk] had to be solid, but lightweight, so then that led us to origami,” said Make lead project architect Sean Affleck. “[You] end up with something very flimsy; add a few folds and creases, and suddenly the strength appears. In the folds, the shape appears.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Grains to Galleries: Heatherwick design converts South African silos into a cathedral for art

V&A Heatherwick

(Courtesy Heatherwick Studio)

A monolithic cluster of concrete silos on the Cape Town waterfront is the subject of a dramatic surgical intervention. The industrial relic will be transformed by Thomas Heatherwick into an art museum planned for the city’s V&A Waterfront. The project entails the conversion of the grain silo complex into a new space to house and display the Jochen Zeitz Collection, an assortment of art that will act as the foundation for Zeitz MOCAA a non-profit institution dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora.

More after the jump.

Merging Modernity Into Nature: Bjarke Ingels Takes A Trip to the Bahamas

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy BIG)

Albany Bahamas Resort Honeycomb Building
Architect: BIG + HKS + MDA
Location: Albany Bahamas
Client: New Providence, The Bahamas
Completion: TBD

A team comprised of the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), HKS, and MDA has unveiled its design for the Honeycomb building at the Albany Bahamas resort. This 175,000-square-foot private residential building takes its name from its hexagonal facade, which mimics the naturally occurring shapes in the coral reefs found off the shores of New Providence. When completed, it will be the tallest structure on the island.

Continue reading after the jump.

Lebbeus Woods Retrospective to Open at the Drawing Center in NYC

Architecture, East, Media
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
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Concentric Field. (Copyright Estate of Lebbeus Woods)

Concentric Field. (Copyright Estate of Lebbeus Woods)

Lebbeus Woods was a powerful presence in New York City and in the world of architectural thinking and expression. It’s still unsettling to think he is no longer here to push and provoke the world of architecture towards a more thoughtful and challenging practice. Though his ethical voice (his projects and writing can still be explored at lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com) and the demanding worlds he created inside his drawings will no longer confront the major issues of the day we still have his drawings to remind us of his thinking and vision. The first major retrospective of Woods career will open at the Drawing Center in New York on April 16, 2014 and was organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and is currently in view at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University (through March 2, 2014). 

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Peter Eisenman Wins Prestigious Italian Award.  Peter Eisenman. (Chris Wiley)Peter Eisenman. (Chris Wiley) Peter Eisenman has been awarded with the 2014 Piranesi Prix de Rome for Career Achievement by the Accademia Adrianea di Architettura e Archeologia and the Ordine degli Architetti della Provincia di Roma. At the official ceremony to be held in Rome next month, Eisenman will give a lecture that “will concentrate on his theoretical work, with particular reference to the concept of ‘archaeology’ – understood as a design technique based on stratigraphic layering – and on the recent work entitled Piranesi Variations.”      

 

Explore Grand Central’s History With Fun, New Website

Grand Central's Main Concourse in 1914. (New York Transit Museum)

Grand Central’s Main Concourse in 1914. (New York Transit Museum)

Grand Central has always been more than a train station. It’s an architectural and cultural touchstone for New York City. Even the most hurried commuter will stop to admire the building’s impressive scale and immaculate detail, before making their next transfer or stepping onto the crowded Midtown streets.

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TxDOT Approves Barton Creek Bicycle Bridge for Austin

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Since the construction of the twin freeway bridges that carry the MoPac expressway over Barton Creek in 1987, the Austin community has been clamoring for a bike and pedestrian bridge to accompany it. That outcry has now been answered. On February 11, The Texas Department of Transportation approved just such a crossing. The project will cost the state around $7.7 million and will take approximately thirty months to complete.

According to the Austin Public works department the construction will be handled in three phases: Phase I includes adding a bicycle/pedestrian bridge over Barton Creek at MoPac. The south bound lanes of MoPac will also be re-striped to lessen traffic congestion and to improve bicycle and pedestrian connections to the Southwest Parkway, Loop 360, and other trails in the area, including the Violet Crown Trail and the Oak Hills Neighborhood Trail System.

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Montreal Hopes a Soaring New Boardwalk Will Activate the St. Lawrence River

Architecture, International
Tuesday, February 18, 2014
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RFA Archpaper 5

(Courtesy Ruccolo + Faubert Architectes)

The Plage de l’Est, a heretofore unoccupied site along the shores of the St. Lawrence River will now be recast as a recreational gathering area for Montreal residents.  The overhaul of the vacant area has been mooted since 2010, but in 2013 the city put out a call for ideas for the project. Ultimately the submission from Ruccolo + Faubert Architectes & Ni conception architecture de paysage emerged from a field of 5 finalists in a recent decision.

Continue reading after the jump.

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