Innovative Technologies & the Facade Building Process: Two “Can’t Miss” Workshops at facades+ on 7/12!

National
Tuesday, July 2, 2013
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CO Architects, winner of the 2013 BIM Awards, was recognized for the design of the Health Sciences Education Building on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus. (IMAGE COURTESY OF CO ARCHITECTS)

This year’s facades+ PERFORMANCE conference features an exciting line-up of Dialog Workshops. Here are two that you won’t want to miss!

On paper, the steps involved in creating and delivering a high-performance building facade seem relatively simple. In reality, unforeseen changes in cost and scheduling often complicate the process and hinder it’s timely completion. At our facades+ PERFORMANCE Conference in San Francisco on July 12th, Alex Korter and Kevin Kavanagh from CO Architects, winners of the 2013 BIM Awards, will present the “Breaking Facades: Why Process is Often More Important Than Materiality” Dialog Workshop. Through a step by step analysis, the pair will explore the process of creating and delivering a high-performance building facade, from beginning to end.

By participating in this morning workshop registered architects will earn 4 LU AIA CE credits! Don’t miss this opportunity to learn helpful tips in dodging obstacles and successfully navigating the creation and delivery of the intelligent facade from leading industry experts.

Continue reading after the jump.

Meet Ronald Rael of Emerging Objects at Facades+PERFORMANCE San Francisco on 7/12!

National
Monday, July 1, 2013
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Ronald Rael of Emerging Objects will join facades+ PERFORMANCE in San Francisco

Ronald Rael of Emerging Objects will join facades+ PERFORMANCE in San Francisco

We are excited to announce that Ronald Rael, founding partner of Emerging Objects, will join Ronnie Parsons of Mode Collective at our facades+ PERFORMANCE conference in San Francisco in less than two weeks!

Emerging Objects is a pioneering 3D printing design and research company that reaches beyond using plastic and focuses on using innovative, sustainable, and recyclable materials—paper, nylon, salt, wood, clay, acrylic, and cement polymer—to create 3D printing objects for the built environment, including facade elements such as “The Wave Curtain.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Q+A> Part Two of AN’s Discussion with Eco-Architect Ken Yeang

National
Friday, June 28, 2013
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(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

This is second of a two part interview of Ken Yeang one of the earliest thinkers and designers in the field of sustainable architecture. The interview was conducted by Mic Patterson of Enclos who will be introducing Yeang at The Architect’s Newspaper’s Facades+PERFORMANCE conference on July 11 in San Francisco.

Mic Patterson: Your work clearly demonstrates that concepts of bioclimatic design are readily scalable from the residence to the skyscraper to the urban environment. How do the considerations of bioclimatic design apply at the scale of building subassembly or the the building skin?

Ken Yeang: At the sub-assembly level, we have developed devices such as the ‘raincheck’ wall being a glazing façade system that lets in ventilation but keeps out rain. Another device we are working on is a ‘solar chimney’ that uses a double-glazed glass-shaft to naturally ventilate internal spaces.

Continue reading after the jump.

Anthony Foxx & Tom Prendergast Confirmed as Head of USDOT and NYC MYA

National
Thursday, June 27, 2013
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Tom Prendergast (left) and Anthony Foxx (right).

Tom Prendergast (left) and Anthony Foxx (right).

We’ve known for a while that Tom Prendergast and Anthony Foxx would be leading New York City’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) and the U.S. Department of Transportation for a while now, but now it’s official. The New York State Senate has confirmed Prendergast has been appointed as the new chairman and CEO of the MTA and Congress has okayed President Obama’s selection of Anthony Foxx as the new Secretary of Transportation.

Prendergast, who has extensive experience working in the transit system, is replacing Joe Lhota who left the position to run for New York City Mayor. With Prendergast’s new role comes the heavy responsibility of managing an annual $13 billion dollar budget and effectively serving 8.5 million commuters per weekday.

Anthony Foxx, former mayor of Charlotte, North Carolina, replaces Secretary Ray LaHood, a notable enforcer of safety who initiated a strong campaign against distracted driving. Foxx says that he will follow from LaHood’s example, making safety a priority as well.

The Shortlist> Top Five Competitions of the Week

National
Thursday, June 27, 2013
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Splash

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test?  Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

Skin Digital Fabrication Competition. TEX-FAB has launched the 2013 SKIN Competition. The international, two-stage digital fabrication competition invites architect, designers, and researchers to rethink the building envelope and boldly explore performative qualities of a facade. Participants are free to select any context of their choosing, real or virtual, at any scale and on any building type. In phase one of the competition four winners will be awarded a $1,000 stipend used towards the development of their design. The winning proposal will be built at scale with fabrication sponsorship by Zahner Co, will win $1,000  and will be exhibited in Austin, Texas for the TEX-FAB 5 event in February 2014.

Registration Deadline: June 30, 2013
Submission Deadline: June 30, 2013

Continue reading after the jump.

Discovering Cities: An Update from Architects & Planners Biking Across the Country

National
Thursday, June 27, 2013
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Cycle lanes and landscaping in Indianapolis. (Eric Fischer / Flickr)

Cycle lanes and landscaping in Indianapolis. (Eric Fischer / Flickr)

[ Editor's Note: Peter Murray, of the New London Architecture Center, together with a dozen architects and planners, is biking from Portland, Oregon to Portland Place in London, studying how cities are responding to the demand for better cycling infrastructure. He reports from the start of his ride. The Architect’s Newspaper is USA media sponsor of the trip and will post periodic updates of these architects on bicycles. As the P2P team gears up for its triumphant arrival in Manhattan on Sunday (June 30th) having completed the U.S. leg of the trip, Peter Murray looks back at some of the highlights of the last week’s riding. ]

One of the delights of cycling across the States has been to experience cities whose names were familiar to me but whose contemporary characteristics and qualities were a void. I am ashamed to admit that when first researching our route through Pittsburgh my main ideas of the city were influenced by scenes of Pennsylvania’s shrinking steel industry from Michael Cimino’s 1978 film The Deerhunter. Instead, I found that Pittsburgh is “the regeneration capital of the U.S.,” eds and meds have replaced steel and it has a fast-improving bicycle infrastructure. Much of the credit for this last piece of progress must go to the energy of Scott Bricker and Lou Fineberg who founded Bike Pittsburgh just over a decade ago. The city still has a long way to go but it has bike lanes and riverside trails and it is highly probable that the next Mayor will be the Democrat Bill Peduto, who is a strong supporter of better biking. Of buildings in the city, we much enjoyed H. H. Richardson’s powerful Allegheny Courthouse and Jail with its rough stone masonry and Romanesque detailing.

Continue reading after the jump.

Q+A> Eco-Architect Ken Yeang, Facades+PERFORMANCE Conference Keynote

National, Newsletter
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
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(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

Ken Yeang is an architect and was an early theorist of green architecture. In England, where he was educated at the AA (completing a diploma under Peter Cook) and Cambridge where he earned a PhD in ecological planning and design, Yeang is celebrated as a founder of the sustainable architecture movement. In 1995 he published his major theoretical work Designing with Nature that evolved out his Cambridge thesis and it is one of the first texts on ecological architecture. At the The Architect’s Newspaper’s Facades+PERFORMANCE conference on July 11, Yeang will lecture in the US for the first time at the University of California San Francisco in Mission Bay. Yeang recently answered a series of questions posed by Mic Patterson of Enclos who will introduce him in San Francisco. Here is part one of the interview, the second half will appear tomorrow on the AN Blog.

Mic Patterson Your early theoretical work, and ultimately your built work, anticipated the sustainable development that is finally beginning to emerge at a broader scale: climatic design, green walls and vertical gardens, sky courts, biomimicry, solar geometry as a form generator. Why has the adoption of these concepts by the building community been so slow? How do you see these themes developing into the future?

Ken Yeang. I am not sure why our concepts and ideas on green design have been slow to gain traction by the building industry and by our community of professionals. It may be because public adoption of new ideas first require champions by important figures like politicians and leaders in the profession and industry.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Denise Scott Brown Effect: AIA Revises Criteria for Gold Medal Award

National
Friday, June 21, 2013
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Rob Venturi and Denise Scott Brown

Rob Venturi and Denise Scott Brown.

The AIA Gold Medal Award is the highest honor an architect can receive from the American Institute of Architects. Until now, the award could only be presented to individual architects, but the AIA has just announced that as of January 1, 2014 this prestigious award will be open to an individual or two individuals who have equally collaborated on the design and execution of one distinguished architectural body of work that makes a lasting statement on the theory and practice of architecture.

Continue reading after the jump.

Fentress, CO Architects Recognized at 2013 BIM Awards

National
Friday, June 21, 2013
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CO Architect's Health Sciences Education Building, Phoenix Biomedical Campus. (Courtesy CO Architects)

CO Architect’s Health Sciences Education Building, Phoenix Biomedical Campus. (Courtesy CO Architects)

The AIA Technology in Architectural Practice (TAP), in association with BIM Forum, The Construction Owners Association of America (COAA), and the International Facility Management Association (IFMA) have announced the winners of the 9th Annual Building Information Modeling (BIM) Awards which recognize the firms who best utilize BIM technology. Out of 16 submissions the jury selected two winners and three honorable mentions.

Winners after the jump.

National Trust Announces 2013 List of America’s Most Endangered Historic Places

National
Thursday, June 20, 2013
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Gay Head Lighthouse in Aquinnah, Massachusetts (Courtesy of Martha’s Vineyard Museum)

Gay Head Lighthouse in Aquinnah, Massachusetts (Courtesy of Martha’s Vineyard Museum)

Wednesday, the National Trust for Historic Preservation released its 2013 list of “America’s Most Endangered Historic Places” made up of cultural landmarks, historic houses of worship, civic spaces, derelict industrial structures, and a significant waterway. For twenty-five years, the National Trust has launched campaigns to save historic structures and places in regions across the United States—many of which are vulnerable from years of neglect or the threat of demolition. In a press conference over Twitter, President and CEO Stephanie K. Meeks explained the impetus for including these specific sites: “It’s always a tough choice, but we evaluate on significance, urgency of threat, and possible solution.” The designation, Meeks said, is a tool for drawing attention to places “in a national context of significance” that might otherwise go unnoticed.

This year’s motley list includes the likes of Gay Head Lighthouse in Martha’s Vineyard and San Jose Church in Puerto Rico built in 1532.

View the endangered sites after the jump.

The Shortlist> Top Five Competitions of the Week

National
Thursday, June 20, 2013
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Designing Recovery Competition (AIA)

Designing Recovery Competition (AIA)

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test?  Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

Designing Recovery. AIA, Architecture for Humanity, Make It Right Foundation, and the St. Bernard Project are sponsoring a residential design competition that will substantially impact the lives of families who have been affected by disaster. The competition solicits high quality, affordable housing designs to reduce damaged caused by natural disasters. Three cities (Queens, NY; Joplin, MO; and New Orleans, LA) have been chosen as the settings for the competition. $10,000 will be awarded to one design for each location, and the goal is to utilize as many entries as possible to construct affordable housing.

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2013.

Continue reading after the jump.

Michael Van Valkenburgh Overhauling The Menil Collection Campus

National
Wednesday, June 19, 2013
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Renzo Piano's Menil Collection. (Paul Hester)

Menil Collection. (Paul Hester)

New York-based landscape architecture firm Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA) has been selected to develop new designs for The Menil Collection’s 30-acre campus in Houston, Texas. The appointment kicks off the Menil’s “neighborhood of art” master plan, designed in 2009 by London-based David Chipperfield Architects. Chipperfield’s scheme attempts to tie together a group of six buildings spread across several blocks and interspersed with outdoor sculpture gardens and green spaces. The museum anticipates that groundwork for the initial stage of MVVA’s design will begin this September.

Continue reading after the jump.

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