Swedish professor creates a playable 3-D printed saxophone

International, Newsletter, Technology
Friday, September 12, 2014
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3D Printed Saxophone (Courtesy Lund University)

3D Printed Saxophone (Courtesy Lund University)

As the world of 3-D printing advances, it’s becoming possible to create more and more complex shapes and systems. Now, the technology is making waves in the music world. Olaf Diegel, a professor of product development at Lund University in Sweden, recently produced the first ever 3-D printed saxophone.

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Zaha Hadid to design mathematics wing at London’s Science Museum

The Mathematics gallery. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

The Mathematics gallery. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

In an effort to make math appear exciting, London‘s Science Museum has tapped Zaha Hadid to design its new mathematics gallery. According to the museum, the new multi-million dollar, Hadid-ian space will “tell stories that place mathematics at the heart of our lives, exploring how mathematicians, their tools and ideas have helped to shape the world from the turn of the 17th century to the present.” If that doesn’t sound absolutely riveting to you, well maybe some math-themed architecture can help.

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Unveiled> Norman Foster & Fernando Romero team up to design Mexico City’s new $9.2 billion airport

Mexico City's new airport will aim for a light environmental footprint through natural ventilation and a massive central hub. (foster + partners / FR-EE)

Mexico City’s new airport will aim for a light environmental footprint through natural ventilation and a massive central hub. (foster + partners / FR-EE)

A new international airport for Mexico City won’t just fix the problems of its predecessor—which typically delays planes because the two runways were built too close together—it will be unique in its efficient expansive single enclosure, according to its architects, Foster + Partners and FR-EE.

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Zaha Hadid designs an elegant wave at the V&A Museum for the London Design Festival

Architecture, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 3, 2014
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Zaha Hadid Crest Installation (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid Crest Installation (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

London’s Victoria & Albert Museum is preparing to construct an art installation by Zaha Hadid. Called Crest, the oval form takes its name from ocean waves and will appear in the museum’s John Madejski garden as part of the London Design Festival, which takes place later this month.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Five new apps put urban planning at your fingertips

oppspace

(Courtesy OpportunitySpace)

In the age of apps, we have seen basic human activities like eating, dating, shopping, and exercising be condensed into simple swipes and clicks. It’s a brave new world and one that has folded-in the complex process of financing, developing, and designing new projects. And in recent years, there has been a batch of new apps designed to help planners, architects, cities, and the general public create more livable cities. Here are a few of those apps that caught AN’s attention. Read More

Eavesdrop> Muckraking Architecture Critics!

Zaha Hadid. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid has sued the New York Review of Books. The complaint, filed last month in Manhattan Supreme Court, takes issue with a piece by architecture critic Martin Filler that allegedly mischaracterized her comments on the deaths of hundreds of migrant construction workers in Qatar, where she has designed a soccer stadium for the 2022 World Cup.

Continue reading after the jump.

Look inside Alvar Aalto’s celebrated works with Google Street View

Alvar Aalto Museum. (Flickr / pntphoto)

Alvar Aalto Museum. (Flickr / pntphoto)

Google Street View has been snooping way beyond the curb. The see-all service has spread into museums, inside businesses, onto hiking trails, and even leads curated street art tours in cities around the world. Now, the service has expanded into architecture. The newest feature allows curious internet explorers to step inside some of Alvar Aalto’s most celebrated buildings without booking a flight or even looking away from the ever-present glow of their computer screen.

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Video> NIKE opens a motion-tracking, LED basketball court in China

The House of Mamba. (Courtesy NIKE)

The House of Mamba. (Courtesy NIKE)

Nike has covered a basketball court in Shanghai with LED sensors and the result looks like a live-action video game. The court is called the “House of Mamba”—not to be confused with the new “House of Vans” in London—and it’s topped with reactive sensors that track players’ every move.

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Look inside London’s subterranean funhouse, The House of Vans

Architecture, International
Thursday, August 28, 2014
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The skate park. (Courtesy House of Vans.)

The skate park. (Courtesy House of Vans.)

The house that Vans built is 30,000 square feet, cavernous, and deep underneath London. The iconic shoe and clothes retailer recently transformed the Old Vic Tunnels beneath Waterloo Station into “The House of Vans”—a multi-level, subterranean cultural venue complete with galleries, artist studios, a café, two bars, an 85-person music venue, a 160-person cinema, and, of course, a skate park.

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How concrete floors can save thousands of lives in Bangladesh

Architecture, International
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
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A concrete floor being installed as part of ARCHIVE’s pilot project in February. (Courtesy ARCHIVE Global)

Concrete floor being installed during ARCHIVE’s pilot project in February. (Courtesy ARCHIVE Global)

With so many starchitect-designed, headline-grabbing skyscrapers rising around the world, it’s easy to overlook the more modest projects in the shadows of those glass towers—the projects designed for those stuck on the other end of the economic spectrum. These homes, schools, community centers, and clinics—often designed by lesser-known architects—may not be as stunning as new high-rises, but they prove that design can do more than improve lives, it can save them too. And that is exactly what the non-profit ARCHIVE (Architecture for Health in Vulnerable Environments) hopes to prove with a new project in Savar, Bangladesh.

Continue reading after the jump.

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International Union of Architects pledges to eliminate carbon emissions in the built environment

Aerial view of New York City. (Flickr / Katy Silberger)

Aerial view of New York City. (Flickr / Katy Silberger)

The International Union of Architects (UIA) has made a major commitment to do its part in the fight against climate change. At its recent World Congress in Durban, South Africa, the Union—which represents 1.3 million architects from 124 countries—universally pledged to eliminate carbon emissions from the built environment by 2050. The “2050 Imperative” was created by the non-profit Architecture 2030 and approved by the UIA on August 8th.

Learn more after the jump.

If Roald Dahl were an architect, he might have designed a school like this

Prestwood Infant School (Courtesy De Rosee Sa and PMR Architecture)

Prestwood Infant School. (Courtesy De Rosee Sa and PMR Architecture)

What better time to be immersed in the fairytale landscapes of renowned author Roald Dahl than as a child first experiencing his books. Children growing up in Great Missenden, England, Dahl’s old neighborhood of 36 years, will have this colorful experience in a whimsical new school building designed set to begin construction in October.

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