Quick Clicks> Coffee, Immobility, Engagement, Hipsters

Daily Clicks
Monday, January 24, 2011
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Historic JFG Coffee sign in Knoxville, TN (Courtesy Knox Heritage)

Historic JFG Coffee sign in Knoxville, TN (Courtesy Knox Heritage)

[ Quick Clicks is AN's guided tour of interesting links from around the web. ]

Coffee Break. A fourteen-foot tall neon sign that has been removed from the Knoxville, TN skyline after 50 years is undergoing restoration but needs a new home. Preservation magazine has the story and Knox Heritage has more info on their sign restoration program.

More clicks after the jump.

Quick Clicks> View, Fix, Crash, Don′t Crash

Daily Clicks
Thursday, January 20, 2011
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View from rooftop of planned Brooklyn Bridge Park restaurant (via Curbed)

View from rooftop of planned Brooklyn Bridge Park restaurant (via Curbed)

[ Quick Clicks: A regular guided tour of interesting links from around the web. ]

What a view. Curbed uncovered a few renderings of the planned restaurant at Brooklyn Bridge Park including the view from its rooftop terrace (Hey, where’d the Beekman 8 Spruce Tower run off to?). There’s currently an RFP out until January 25 for a restaurant operator to fill the already partially-built concrete and wood structure.

More clicks just after the jump.

University of Arkansas′ Big-Box Bacalaureate

Other
Thursday, January 20, 2011
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Walmart on Campus in Arkansas (Photo courtesy Walter Lang)

Walmart on Campus in Arkansas (Photo courtesy Walter Lang)

Walmart has been trying to expand into cities like New York and Washington, D.C. for a while now sparking debate about big box retail in urban centers along the way. To find space, Walmart will likely have to abandon the supercenter in favor of a more petite space, but slimming down to a mere 3,500 square feet sounds pretty extreme.

More on schooling Walmart after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Lost, Super, Speed, Parking

Daily Clicks
Monday, January 17, 2011
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Hotel Grand Prospect rendering (Courtesy Curbed)

Hotel Grand Prospect rendering (Courtesy Curbed)

Parking Slope. A parking lot in Park Slope, Brooklyn could soon sprout an 11-story, 166-room hotel designed by Doban Architecture (pictured above). Curbed stopped by a community meeting last Thursday and reports Hotel Grand Prospect has extended the neighborhood an olive branch in the form of a 400-car parking garage which has won over some community members. The project is still in its early phases and traffic and environmental studies have yet to be completed. (More at Curbed.)

More quick clicks after the jump.

Quick Clicks: Ruination, Context, Issues, Movement, Resolutions

Daily Clicks
Friday, January 14, 2011
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Obelisk in Central Park (Courtesy Thom Watson/Flickr)

Obelisk in Central Park (Courtesy Thom Watson/Flickr)

[ Quick Clicks> A hand-selected tour of links from around the world. ]

Ruination. Mayor Bloomberg received an angry letter in the mail last week from Zahi Hawass, the secretary general of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities. According to the NY Times, Hawass is threatening to take back the circa-1500 B.C. monument if the city doesn’t properly care for the inscribed hieroglyphics. Heavily eroded, the obelisk was a gifted to the United States in 1869 to celebrate the completion of the Suez Canal.

Much, much more after the jump!

Video: Making a Brownfield Beautiful

Other
Monday, January 10, 2011
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A brownfield being reclaimed (Courtesy ASLA)

A brownfield being reclaimed (Courtesy ASLA)

The American Society of Landscape Architects has created a great step-by-step video demonstrating how to return a contaminated brownfield site into a real community asset. The video, appropriately titled From Industrial Wasteland to Community Park, traces an abandoned refinery on its way from bio-hazard to bio-helpful.

More info and the video after the jump!

Quick Clicks: Failing Schools, Hangover, Beekman Boos, Grand Piano

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, December 14, 2010
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Renzo Piano's London Shard (Courtesy Sellar Property Group)

Renzo Piano's London Shard (Courtesy Sellar Property Group)

Failing schools. Fast Company isn’t pulling any punches with a title like “American Design Schools are a Mess, and Produce Weak Graduates.” Designer Gadi Amit laments in his lengthy critique, “I’m finding that the impressive academic credentials of most students don’t add up to the basic skills I require in a junior designer. Simply put, the design education system today is failing many aspiring young students.” [ Fast Company ]

Hangover. It’s difficult to imagine how such a thing could happen, but an architect working for the US government in Japan managed to rack up a tab of $36,890 at a Tokyo bar. (If you’re curious, that’s 3,011 shots!) The bill is the result of a drum-based bar-competition, and architect Kaz Miura now holds a title previously held by bankers and movie stars. [ The Australian via UnBeige ]

Booing Beekman. James Gardner delivers a scathing review of Frank Gehry’s yet-to-be-completed 8 Sprice Street née Beekman Tower in Lower Manhattan. Opening with a question, Gardner asks why the tower is “so thoroughly sad and unimpressive.” Ouch. And it doesn’t get much better further in. At the root of it, the problem seems to be that the tower is rather conventional despite its curvaceous titanium skin. [ The Real Deal ]

Grand Piano. Renzo Piano’s London skyscraper dubbed the Shard (rendered at top) has topped out, or at least its central concrete core. Standing over 1,000 feet tall, the Shard will be the tallest tower in the UK and the tallest commercial tower in Europe. (And, if you recall, Renzo Piano is pretty tall himself.) Construction started in early 2009 and the tower is expected to be complete by the summer of 2012. [ BD Online ]

Filed Under: 

Daily Clicks: Top Ten, Exhibitionist, Streetcars, Saving Trees

Daily Clicks
Friday, December 10, 2010
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Stephan Sagmeister's new web site. (Courtesy Sagmeister.com)

Stephan Sagmeister's new web site. (Courtesy Sagmeister.com)

We’re starting up a new regular feature here on the AN Blog we’re tentatively calling Daily Clicks. For your perusal, a quick selection of architecture and design stories from around the web.

The year’s best. The Chicago Tribune‘s Blair Kamin looks beyond the doom and gloom that was 2010 to find the top ten architectural bright spots. Among his picks? The opening of the Burj Khalifa and a pollution-eating park in Chicago, and [ City Scapes ]

Cincy Streetcar. Cincinnati is one step closer to a new streetcar system, after the Ohio Department of Transportation unanimously recommended $35 million for construction of the system’s first phase, which is expected to open in 2013. [ Urban Cincy ]

Don’t hit print! A new file format, the WWF (after the World Wildlife Fund, of course), aims at saving a few trees as we send around PDFs through e.mail. If you’d like to prohibit your PDFs from being printed, there’s a free software download. [ Core 77 ]

Office Exhibitionism. Artist Stephan Sagmeister has a new web site. Now, you can sit and stare at a live feed from a web cam inside his New York studio to make sure everyone’s working. On this late Friday afternoon, orange balloons were strewn across the floor, leaving us regretting we’d missed the party.  [ Creative Review ]

    Filed Under: 

    So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright

    Other
    Friday, December 10, 2010
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    Frank Lloyd Wright (Courtesy Library of Congress)

    Frank Lloyd Wright (Courtesy Library of Congress)

    Not many architects can boast being the subject of a pop song, but, then again, Frank Lloyd Wright was always something special. Back in 1969, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel eulogized the architect in the eponymous “So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright,” appearing on their Bridge Over Troubled Water album. Garfunkel took an interest in Wright while studying architecture at Columbia and later challenged Simon to write the song while living in California.

    While some argue that the song is really a cryptic breakup poem between the two singers on the verge of splitting, I’m sticking with architecture going mainstream. As the song says, “Architects may come and/Architects may go and/Never change your point of view./ When I run dry/I stop awhile and think of you.”

    Hear the song after the jump.

    Filed Under: 

    Architects with Altitude

    Other
    Thursday, December 9, 2010
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    Towering figures in the field of architecture (BK / Architect's Newspaper)

    Towering figures in the field of architecture. Click to enlarge. (BK / Architect's Newspaper)

    Witold Rybczynski, smart writer, stupid article.

    Last Thursday, Slate‘s respected architecture critic weighed in with the dubious notion that the shorter in height, the greater the architect. This silly notion has gone viral on the web, and we felt it was our job to rebut it with some tall figures. Here they are.

    Rolling on the High Line

    East, Other
    Wednesday, December 8, 2010
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    View of the High Line lawn from HL23. (Image: Diana Darling)

     

    We were scouting cool party spaces recently and caught this view from the 9th floor of Neil Denari’s HL23 on the High Line. Lower floors of the 14-story condo, now nearing completion, are going to feel pretty vulnerable to nose-pressers strolling up the rail-bed park who will be just feet away from their living room glass walls. But on the upper floors, views of the length of High Line will unfurl as alluringly as the Yellow Brick Road. Right now, it’s possible to make out the stretch of emerald lawn section at 23rd Street, waiting for its sunbathers.

    Filed Under: , ,

    Towering Beacon Awaits Approval in Miami Beach

    Other
    Thursday, December 2, 2010
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    Tobias Rehberger's Lighthouse proposal for Miami (Courtesy Art Newspaper)

    Tobias Rehberger's Lighthouse proposal for Miami (Courtesy Art Newspaper)

    You won’t see German artist Tobias Rehberger‘s proposed Lighthouse installation at this year’s Art Basel exhibition in Miami Beach, but if the city approves the project next week, the towering beacon could be lighting up the night sky by the end of 2011.  To be located in South Pointe Park at a cost of $500,000, the 55-foot tall Lighthouse is comprised of stacked cylinders and would represent Rehberger’s first public commission in the United States. [ Via The Art Newspaper. ]

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