Slideshow> A New York Year in A New York Minute

East, Newsletter
Monday, December 26, 2011
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The acrylic from Nouvele's carousel mutes views of the Brooklyn Bridge, One World Trade, and Ghery's 8 Spruce. (Stoelker/AN)

The acrylic walls of Nouvel's carousel building offer a new view of the Brooklyn Bridge, One World Trade, and Gehry's 8 Spruce. (Stoelker/AN)

Neither blizzards, an earthquake, or Hurricane Irene slowed down work here at 21 Murray Street. Nor did any of these disrupt work down the street at the World Trade Center. The demonstrations at Zuccotti Park did not get in the way, nor the spontaneous turn out following the death of Osama bin Laden. Construction only paused for the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. Some of the year’s biggest stories sat at our doorstep, and quite often, we only had to go downstairs to capture their images. Here are a few photos of the news and news-makers taken downtown, as well as a few from uptown, across town, and over the river…

View slideshow after the jump.

Proposed Light Installation Responds to Noise Pollution in Red Hook

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
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Silent Lights proposal (Courtesy Artist Build Collaborative).

Silent Lights proposal (Courtesy Artist Build Collaborative).

The Artists Build Collaborative is attempting to bring light and clarity to an area of Red Hook most notable for its darkness and confusion. The proposal, Silent Lights, is a system of interactive illuminated gates along a pedestrian path along Hamilton Avenue under the Brooklyn Queens Expressway. With a high concentration of both human and motor traffic in the area, the installation will respond to the surrounding vehicular cacophony by translating sound pollution into light, allowing the auditory experiencee to be both seen and heard.

Continue reading after the jump.

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St. Louis to I-70, Put A Lid On It

Midwest, Newsletter
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
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St. Louis will soon build a "lid" over I-70 to better connect the Arch with downtown.

The grounds surrounding the St. Louis Arch have long been cut off from downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods. One of the chief goals of the City+River+Arch competition was to improve connectivity. St. Louis recently received $20 million in federal TIGER III grants to build a lid over 1-70, one of the most important pieces of the Michael Van Valkenburgh-led redesign of the Arch grounds. The overall cost of the redesign is estimated at $578 million, so the grant is just a fraction of the overall funding needed. Still, it’s an important, early sign that this ambitious project is moving ahead.

 

Cornell Wins: Next Stop Roosevelt Island

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
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SOM's plan for Cornell's tech campus on Roosevelt Island.

SOM's plan for Cornell's tech campus on Roosevelt Island.

With his hand essentially forced by a hasty withdraw of Stanford on Friday, and the hugely enticing carrot of a $350 million gift from Duty-Free billionaire and Cornell alum Charles Feeney, Mayor Bloomberg announced on Monday that the Cornell team will be building the NYC Tech Campus on Roosevelt Island. The terms “game changer” and “transformative” were bandied about with regularity throughout the mayor’s midday press conference, which was streamed live on the net to the delight of Cornell’s partnering campus, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology. The Israeli students’ digitally lapsed cheering added a techy touch.

Read More

Stanford is Ennead Country

Newsletter, West
Wednesday, December 14, 2011
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Ennead's new Anderson building would be located just west of its soon-to-be complete Bing Concert Hall. (courtesy Stanford University)

Ennead Architects (formerly Polshek Partership) seems to be taking over Stanford University one building at a time. First they built the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts in 1998. Then they finished the Stanford Law School Academic Building in 2010. They were also commissioned to build the Bing Concert Hall, which will open in 2013. And now they’ve just been chosen to build a $30.5 million, 30,000 square foot building for the Anderson Collection, a renowned compilation of post-World War II American Art. The building will also contain a library, offices, and storage spaces. Designs for the project will be released this Spring, according to Stanford. The Anderson, the Bing, the Cantor, and the new 96,000 square foot Burton and Deedee McMurtry Building, awarded in April to Diller Scofidio+ Renfro and containing undergraduate art and film studios, galleries, and an art and architecture library, will form the center of Stanford’s “arts district.”  Read More

Slideshow> WTC Memorial at Night

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, December 14, 2011
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Sonohetta's entrance to the Memorial Museum overlooks the North Pool.

Snøhetta's entrance to the Memorial Museum overlooks the North Pool.

Last Friday, AN went to the 9/11 Memorial, without a press pass, an official tour guide, or a hard hat. We went as a neighbor and experienced the place as any other visitor might. First, we attempted to get our ticket online. After checking the availability on Tuesday, we dithered, and by Wednesday online tickets were gone. But at the temporary exhibition space on Liberty Street, and a manager told us that a $20 ticket to the museum would get us into the memorial without reservations.

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Video> Create a 3-D Model Out of a Series of Photographs

International, Newsletter
Monday, December 12, 2011
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123D Catch preview. (Courtesy Autodesk)

123D Catch preview. (Courtesy Autodesk)

Imagine snapping away at a favorite building, fountain, or desktop tchotchke, then uploading your photos to that super-computer in the sky we call the cloud, and after a just few short minutes being presented with a detailed three-dimensional digital model. That future, it appears, is finally here. Core 77 tipped us off that a new product by Autodesk called 123D Catch performs that basic photo-to-3D-model conversion, and the best part (if you’re running a PC) is that you can try out the beta version for free. We’re on Macs here at The Architect’s Newspaper HQ so we haven’t had a chance to test drive the software ourselves, but if it’s anything like Autodesk’s slick video demonstration (after the jump), we’ll be sending our photo archive cloud-side soon!

Watch the video demonstration after the jump.

Holl Gets AIA Gold, VJAA Wins Firm Award

National, Newsletter
Thursday, December 8, 2011
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Holl's Vanke Center (photo: Iwan Baan)

Steven Holl has been awarded the AIA Gold Medal, the institute’s highest honor and among the most significant in the profession. Holl is known for his formally inventive, richly detailed buildings in the US and around the world, including the Linked Hybrid in Beijing, the Vanke Center in Shenzen, the Bloc Building at the Nelson Atkins Museum in Kansas City, MO, and Simmons Hall at MIT among many other notable projects.

Read More

Slideshow> Apple Takes Bite of Grand Central

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, December 7, 2011
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Apple moves into the Lexington Avenue balcony overlooking Grand Central (Stoelker/AN).

Apple staff await customers on the balcony overlooking Grand Central (Stoelker/AN).

This morning Apple held a press preview of their new Grand Central store, which is set to open this Friday. The first impression of this glassless emporium, an anomaly for the company, is the respectful handling of the hallowed space. The store fills the space vacated by Metrazur restaurant, which wrapped around the Lexington Avenue side balcony. Apple’s showroom takes up half of the northern balcony as well. For Mac fans, the cleaned lined furnishings will be familiar, as are the various stations spread throughout the 23,000-square-foot space. The Genius Bar is still there, as are the iPad and iPod stations, laptops, accessories, and a professional yet casual staff of more than 300. Apple, aided by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, took sight lines into consideration, as the only real hint that the store is there from the concourse are small strips of table lighting, and, of course, the company’s ubiquitous apple which hangs from a grand arch centered on the balcony. It could be argued that logo competes a bit with the world famous clock at the center of the terminal. But otherwise, the interventions appear considerate and reversible.

View the sideshow after the jump

Detroit Still Awaiting Its Very Own RoboCop

Midwest, Newsletter
Monday, December 5, 2011
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Earlier this year, over 2,700 people ponied up cash through the online crowd-funding platform Kickstarter to erect a statue of the 1980s icon RoboCop in Detroit, Michigan. Plenty has been said—both good and bad—about this quest to “uphold the awesome,” whether the statue will be a good or bad thing for the city struggling to regain a solid footing. Curbed Detroit recently checked in with Brandon Walley of Detroit Needs RoboCop and learned the statue could be ready to install as early as the summer of 2012. While a site for the statue must still be secured, organizers are currently awaiting the original RoboCop model to be shipped from Hollywood before the statue can be dipped in bronze. Considering that the 1987 American sci-fi action film was literally set in a near-future (you could say present-day) Detroit, and given the themes of resurrection, memories, and conflicted policies with logical fallacies, the statue likely holds more than just a nugget of nostalgia to the supporters.

Activists Press On for AIDS Memorial at Triangle Park

East, Newsletter
Thursday, December 1, 2011
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A view looking east through the Triangle Park plan by M. Paul Friedberg (courtesy Westside Healthcare Coalition)

A view looking east through the Triangle Park plan by M. Paul Friedberg and Partners. (courtesy Westside Healthcare Coalition)

On the eve of World AIDS Day, dozens crammed into the City Planning building in downtown Manhattan where the Rudin Organization presented plans for the former St. Vincent’s Hospital site at a Universal Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) hearing.  The commission is set to vote on the plan on January 24, but over the last few months yet another issue has emerged at the long contested site. Activists from the Queer History Alliance continue to press for an AIDS Memorial to be placed at a proposed park across the street from the former hospital, which was considered ground zero during the height of the AIDS crisis.

Read More

Unveiled> A BIG Glassy Box for Paris, Sort Of

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, November 29, 2011
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BIG's design for the University of Jussieu in Paris. (Courtesy BIG)

BIG's design for the University of Jussieu in Paris. (Courtesy BIG)

In Bjarke Ingels‘ traditional style, what started as a standard box of a building for Paris’ Université Pierre et Marie Curie has been lifted, bent, and deformed to maximize light, sight lines, and air flow for a cramped urban site. Ingels’ firm BIG and Paris-based OFF recently won won a competition to design the new multidisciplinary research center called Paris PARC to reunite the university’s campus with the surrounding city including Jean Nouvel’s adjacent Institut du Monde Arabe and the nearby Notre Dame Cathedral.

Read More

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