Was The Revel Casino’s Design Its Fatal Flaw?

Development, East, News, Newsletter
Monday, August 18, 2014
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The Revel Casino. (Courtesy Revel)

The Revel Casino. (Courtesy Revel)

Two years ago, AN visited the newly-opened Revel Casino in Atlantic City. At the time, the glassy $2.4 billion complex, designed by Arquitectonica and BLT Architects, was expected to be a transformative property for the iconic boardwalk that offered gambling, convention space, and entertainment. “It’s more of an urban development plan than a typical casino plan,” Revel CEO Kevin DeSanctis told AN. “I am really hoping that we are successful.” In mid-August, we learned that they were not. In its short two-and-a-half year lifespan, the casino never turned a profit.

Continue reading after the jump.

Product> Surface Effective: Eight Innovative Cladding Materials & Systems

Panelite-ClearShade-Honeycomb-IGU-CS-TBR2

(Courtesy Panelite)

From enhancing aesthetics with digitally-printed ceramic panels to increasing build-speed via all-in-one insulated metal panel systems, these innovative building products offer specialized facade solutions to architects.

ClearShade Insulated Glass Panel
Panelite

A glazing solution that optimizes both daylight and solar heat control, its honeycomb insert is offered in a range of colors and patterns; customization is available.

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Amale Andraos named dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation

Amale-Andraos

Amale Andraos.

Amale Andraos, principal of New York–based architecture firm WORKac, has been named dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation (GSAPP), succeeding Mark Wigley. Currently on faculty at GSAPP, she has also taught at Princeton, Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, and the American University in Beirut.

“Columbia is just an incredibly exciting place that’s always been on the forefront of the profession,” Andraos told AN. “It’s an incredibly diverse and experimental place. I want to maintain and expand its role as a think tank for global practice.”

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Arquitectonica to replace OMA at Miami Convention Center redevelopment

Architecture, East, News, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 12, 2014
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What could have been - OMA's plan for Miami Convention Center. (Courtesy OMA)

What could have been – OMA’s plan for Miami Convention Center. (Courtesy OMA)

Some of the most exciting renderings of the past few years came out of the epic face-off between teacher and student for Miami’s convention center. We’re of course referring to bids by Rem Koolhaas’ OMA and the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) to radically expand and  transform the facility. While it looked like a pretty evenly-matched fight, Rem ultimately won-out with a dramatic transformation of the site. But it was only a matter of time until project accountants and fiscally conservative politicians made it clear that Rem’s billion dollar plans were not going to be realized.

Continue reading after the jump.

Detroit “Reanimate the Ruins” Ideas Competition Tackles Historic Packard Automotive Plant

1st-Place-2

The competition winning proposal, Cross the Plant, by Vincent Lavergne.

In 2009, vandals pushed a dump truck through a hole in the wall on the fourth story of the abandoned Packard Automotive Plant in Detroit. (Of course there’s a video.) It’s a level of dereliction and decay that’s frankly common to North America’s foremost basket-case city, but it’s made a bit more poignant by the fact that the plant (built in 1907 and closed in the late ’90s) was once an icon of Detroit’s command over automotive technology and the automotive industry. The 3.5-million-square-foot facility was designed by Albert Kahn to produce luxury cars, and was the first of its type to use a reinforced concrete structure.

But now it’s time for some more creative thinking about how to use the Packard site.

Shigeru Ban-Designed Aspen Art Museum Opens With A Bang, Literally

Architecture, Art, Newsletter, Southwest
Wednesday, August 6, 2014
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Workers were still putting the finishing touches on the building when it opened to members and the press. (Courtesy AAM)

Workers were still putting the finishing touches on the building when it opened to members and the press on Saturday, August 2. (Courtesy AAM/David X Prutting)

On Saturday, August 2, I had the opportunity to attend the ribbon cutting ceremony and member’s opening of the new Aspen Art Museum (AAM), designed by this year’s Pritzker Prize winner, Shigeru Ban. The event took place at the tail end of AAM’s annual ArtCrush festival, which gathers artists, art collectors, curators, gallery owners, celebrities, and philanthropists from around the world to celebrate contemporary art and raise money for the museum through an auction.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> Singaporean Architect Brings Wavy Design to the High Line

515 High Line. (Courtesy SCDA Architects)

515 High Line. (Courtesy SCDA Architects)

Singaporean architect Soo K. Chan of SCDA Architects is the latest to join an internationally renowned group of architects building along New York’s High Line in Chelsea. Chan isn’t settling for just one building, however. Two new buildings are set to rise just blocks from towers by Norman Foster and Zaha Hadid, and feature differing aesthetics that tap into the luxury market that has skyrocketed in the area.

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SOFTlab creates a flowery vortex for a New York City couture shoe shop

Melissa We Are Flowers (Courtesy SOFTlab)

Melissa We Are Flowers (Alan Tansey Photographer / Courtesy SOFTlab)

Forget about the Sharknado, New York–based designers at SOFTlab have created a vortex of flowers that has taken over one Manhattan shoe store, bringing SOFTlab’s signature parametric forms to the modern shoe brand, Melissa. The Soho store already grabbed design headlines when it opened its flagship location decked out in a custom-fabricated Corian interior by architecture firm Eight and Associated Fabrication. This latest design intervention is part of Melissa’s “We Are Flowers” campaign that used organic shapes and colors to inform its shoe line.

Continue reading after the jump.

Neutra and Alexander’s Orange Coast College buildings facing threat

Neutra and Alexander's Business Education Building (Les Katow)

Neutra and Alexander’s Business Education Building (Les Katow)

Here at AN we’ve seen our share of Richard Neutra tear downs in recent years. The latest possible victim is Neutra and Robert Alexander’s campus-wide buildings at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, which are being threatened by the school’s bond-supported Vision 2020 plan (pdf). If the plan passes the school could tear down the duo’s classrooms, library, business education building, and science wing, as well as extensive landscaping by famed landscape architect Garrett Eckbo, in favor of new buildings, an Urban Street, and a Grand Lawn. The undertaking would be largely funded by 2012’s $698 million Bond Measure R, and total about 250,000 square feet of new construction.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gensler Goes Hollywood with “Vertical Campus”

The 14-story Icon at Sunset Boulevard will house office space for creative and entertainment professionals. (Courtesy Gensler)

The 14-story Icon at Sunset Boulevard will house office space for creative and entertainment professionals. (Courtesy Gensler)

Hudson Pacific Properties is banking on the continued appeal of Hollywood office space with its Icon at Sunset Bronson Studios, a 14-story tower designed by Gensler. Targeting creative professionals, Icon reconfigured the suburban campus typology for an urban setting. Gensler associate Amy Pokawatana called the development a “vertical campus,” blending “work, relaxation, and recreation.” Part of a $150 million studio expansion, the project takes its cue from a six-story building the developer finished on the Sunset Gower Studios lot in 2008.  Read More

Nemaworkshop’s new interiors create mystery and intrigue at the W Mexico City

09-w-mexico-city

W Mexico City (Courtesy nemaworkshop)

Mexico City‘s posh Polanco neighborhood is now home to the recently redesigned Living Rooms of the W Mexico City. Part of a larger $100 million campaign to update its hotels across North America, the W asked New York City–based nemaworkshop, a firm that has been known to—quite literally—turn design on its head, to bring a sense of mystery and illusion to the hotel’s common spaces.

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How New York’s “Poor Door” was allowed to exist in the first place

40 Riverside's facade. (Courtesy Extell)

40 Riverside’s facade. (Courtesy Extell)

In the past week, those two words—”poor door”—have quickly come to signify the vast inequality embedded in New York City’s housing market. At issue is a separate entrance for tenants living in subsidized rental units in a luxury condo building on the Upper West Side known as 40 Riverside. The property, developed by Extell, was financed through the city’s inclusionary housing program, which grants a tax abatement and additional bulk to developers who include a certain portion of “affordable” units in a project.

Continue reading after the jump.

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