Q+A> Eco-Architect Ken Yeang, Facades+PERFORMANCE Conference Keynote

National, Newsletter
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
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(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

Ken Yeang is an architect and was an early theorist of green architecture. In England, where he was educated at the AA (completing a diploma under Peter Cook) and Cambridge where he earned a PhD in ecological planning and design, Yeang is celebrated as a founder of the sustainable architecture movement. In 1995 he published his major theoretical work Designing with Nature that evolved out his Cambridge thesis and it is one of the first texts on ecological architecture. At the The Architect’s Newspaper’s Facades+PERFORMANCE conference on July 11, Yeang will lecture in the US for the first time at the University of California San Francisco in Mission Bay. Yeang recently answered a series of questions posed by Mic Patterson of Enclos who will introduce him in San Francisco. Here is part one of the interview, the second half will appear tomorrow on the AN Blog.

Mic Patterson Your early theoretical work, and ultimately your built work, anticipated the sustainable development that is finally beginning to emerge at a broader scale: climatic design, green walls and vertical gardens, sky courts, biomimicry, solar geometry as a form generator. Why has the adoption of these concepts by the building community been so slow? How do you see these themes developing into the future?

Ken Yeang. I am not sure why our concepts and ideas on green design have been slow to gain traction by the building industry and by our community of professionals. It may be because public adoption of new ideas first require champions by important figures like politicians and leaders in the profession and industry.

Continue reading after the jump.

Brooklyn’s Bush Terminal Pier Park to Open in October

Other
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
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Photo courtesy of Will Ellis of Abandoned NYC

Photo courtesy of Will Ellis of Abandoned NYC

After forty years of existing as a contaminated, abandoned industrial site, the revitalized Bush Terminal Pier Park will finally open this October, just in time for visitors and local residents to enjoy soccer season, watch the leaves change colors, and appreciate the crisp fall weather.

Adrian Smith Landscape Architect’s vision for the redevelopment of the post-industrial shipping, warehousing, and manufacturing site, calls for the complete re-shaping of the land, as well as the modernization of the unused shipping piers located on the waterfront of Sunset Park. At this point in the reconstruction process the basic restructuring of the land, including the defining of new pathways and shorelines, has already been completed so passersby can get a very general understanding of what the future waterfront park will look like.

More after the jump.

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Andrew Geller’s 1958 Pearlroth House Undergoing Restoration

Other
Tuesday, June 25, 2013
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pearlroth

Andrew Geller’s Pearl Roth House (1958) (Image Courtesy of Jake Gorst)

Andrew Geller‘s infamous Pearlroth House, a uniquely designed beach residence located on Dune Road in Westhampton Beach, New York, is undergoing a significant restoration. The task is being carried out by Richard Reinhardt of Reinhardt/O’Brien Contracting and is being supervised by architect Rick Cook, of Cook + Fox Architects, owners Jonathan Pearlroth and Holly Posner, and Andrew Geller’s grandson, Jake Gorst. The one-of-a-kind house was originally built in 1958 for Arthur Pearlroth, an executive for the New York Port Authority, who once had a reputation for being a “lady’s man,” but Gellar collaborated more closely on its actual design with Pearlroth’s wife, Mitch. The couple commissioned Gellar, who often drafted his designs only after carefully studying the projected site and the family’s living habits, to design a summer house that didn’t resemble their ordinary four-walled New York City apartment. The clever design has come to be referred to colloquially as the “square brassiere.”

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Winning “Cellular Complexity” Installation Design Twists the Limits of Architecture

Newsletter, West
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Rendering and model of Cellular Complexity. (Courtesy Julia Koerner, Marie Boltenstern, and Kais Al-Rawi)

Rendering and model of Cellular Complexity. (Courtesy Julia Koerner, Marie Boltenstern, and Kais Al-Rawi)

AIA Los Angeles has announced that UCLA SUPRASTUDIO lecturer Julia Koerner’s proposal Cellular Complexity is the winning entry for the 11th annual 2×8 Student Exhibition, a scholarship organization that has showcased projects of over 150 students from more than 15 architecture and design schools in California. This year’s winning scheme, in collaboration with Paris-based architect Marie Boltenstern and architect Kais Al-Rawi, presents a parametric pavilion of twisting planes that transitions in porosity from one end to the other. According to the AIA|LA, the jury appreciated the design concept’s creativity and edginess. The installation and exhibition of student work is expected to be complete by February 2014.

More images after the jump.

“Sky Reflector Net” Installed at Lower Manhattan’s Fulton Center

East, Newsletter
Monday, June 24, 2013
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Construction of the Sky Reflector-Net at the Fulton Center. (Patrick Cashin / Courtesy MTA)

Construction of the Sky Reflector-Net at the Fulton Center. (Patrick Cashin / Courtesy MTA)

Next year, when construction wraps up at the Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan, commuters will be gazing up, rather than around, at the station’s new artistic centerpiece—a curved, 79-foot-high reflective aluminum diamond web encased in a stainless-steel tracery. The showstopper will send ambient daylight into the mezzanines, passageways, and possibly even the platforms to help passengers orient themselves in the transportation hub.

At $2.1 million, Sky Reflector-Net, an artist/architect/engineer collaboration between James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), Grimshaw Architects, and Arup, is an integrated work created for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Arts for Transit and Urban Design and Metropolitan Transportation Authority Capital Construction (MTACC). It is the largest such work that the MTA has ever commissioned. Sky Reflector-Net seamlessly incorporates both functional and aesthetic goals. The piece was recently installed within the transit center building designed by Grimshaw Architects and Arup.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bonnie Edelman Debuts Image of Philip Johnson’s Pool

Other
Thursday, June 20, 2013
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Bonnie Edelman's "The Glass House" (2012)

Bonnie Edelman’s “The Glass House” (2012)

Art photographer Bonnie Edelman’s visit to The Philip Johnson Glass House resulted in a new addition to her SCAPES (Land, Sea, Sky) collection, a series of photographs that capture natural settings in blurs of color.

“The first shot I made as soon I got there, when the house and pool came into view, was the SCAPE called “The Glass House”, 2012. The pool shape was so incredibly unique and so incredibly blue, where the trees were this beautiful fresh deep Spring green, which gave the pool a glow of sorts through the contrast,” said the artist in a statement.

Philip Johnson added the 6 foot, 4 inch deep concrete pool to the iconic house in 1955. Influenced by philosophy, specifically by Platonic geometry, the pool’s perfect circular form reflects the geometric style of design that defined most of Johnson’s architectural career. The pool, which sits almost hidden from view in the midst of a vibrant green lawn, is complete with a rectangular platform that lies adjacent to it. While it cannot be seen from most of the property, when viewed from higher ground, the flawless circular shape accompanied by the rectangular ledge makes a bold statement of geometry.

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Frank Gehry’s Ice Blocks Chilling Out Inside Chicago’s Inland Steel Building

Midwest, Newsletter
Wednesday, June 19, 2013
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Frank Gehry's new sculpture in the Inland Steel Building lobby. (Lynn Becker)

Frank Gehry’s new sculpture in the Inland Steel Building lobby. (Lynn Becker)

Follow the Architecture Chicago Plus blog as Lynn Becker raises an eyebrow at the new sculpture that quietly popped up in the lobby of downtown Chicago’s celebrated Inland Steel Building.

The 1957 SOM icon seems to have acquired a consortium of ice hunks, courtesy Frank Gehry. Ostensibly a formal counterpoint to the elegant energy of Richard Lippold’s Radiant I, the original lobby art, Gehry’s glass agglomeration (fabricated by the John Lewis Glass Studio of Oakland, California) frames Radiant I and responds to its angularity with carved blobs. It’s admittedly atypical in the setting of the modernist masterpiece, but doesn’t overpower the space or the original artwork.

Product > Finds from the Floor at NeoCon 2013

Midwest, Newsletter, Product
Wednesday, June 19, 2013
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Cliffy 6000 from SIXINCH.

Cliffy 6000 from SIXINCH.

Nearly 42,000 architects, interior designers, facilities planners, furniture dealers, and distributors converged on NeoCon, the A&D industry’s largest exhibition of office, residential, health care, hospitality, institutional, and government design products. Held from June 10–12, the show included education components and keynote presentations from Bjarke Ingels, founder of BIG; Michael Vanderbyl, principal of Vanderbyl Design; Holly Hunt, president & CEO of Holly Hunt; and Lauren Rottet, interior architect and founder of Rottet Studio. AN was present to cover a handful of educational seminars and sessions (see our live tweets from Ingels’s presentation on our Twitter feed), and we scoured the showrooms in search of 2013′s new product trends. Following are a few we saw at the show.

Check out AN’s top picks after the jump.

Q+A> Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher, SFMOMA Architecture & Design Curator

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, June 18, 2013
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Rendering of Snohetta's SFMOMA expansion currently under construction (left) and Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher (right).

Rendering of Snohetta’s SFMOMA expansion currently under construction (left) and Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher (right).

Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher was recently named the head of the department of architecture and design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), filling a position vacated by Henry Urbach more than two years ago. Fletcher just completed a assessment of the museum’s architecture and design collection, and, most recently, she co-curated the exhibition Lebbeus Woods, Architect. She sat down with AN editors Nicole Anderson and Alan G. Brake to discuss her plans for the department.

The Architect’s Newspaper: What direction do you plan to take the architecture and design department?

Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher: The collection just turned 25 and so I think it was important that my colleague Joseph Becker and I, along with Henry Urbach, really undertook a collection analysis and are trying to draw on the identity and strengths of the collection: the experimental and conceptual architecture, the iconic chairs that capture every 20th century design movement, and then the Bay Area collection.

Continue reading after the jump.

Stockholm’s Strawscraper Will Produce Electricity From Thousands of Wind-agitated Straws

Other
Monday, June 17, 2013
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The Strawscraper (Courtesy Belatchew Arkitekter Strawscraper)

The Strawscraper (Courtesy Belatchew Arkitekter)

Tired of hearing about building integrated photovoltaics? Well, the next wave of energy-producing architecture may look quite different. Strawscraper, a project currently underway in Stockholm, will see a building coated in a hair-like material that harvests energy from the wind. The process is known as piezoelectricity. Designed by Swedish firm Belatchew Arkitekter, Strawscraper is an addition to Stockholm’s Söder Torn building, which was completed in 1997. Once transformed into the Strawscraper, the building will stand at 40 stories tall and will act as an “urban power plant,” according to the architect’s website.

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Brooklyn Bridge Park Unveils Ten Proposals to Restore Waterfront Warehouses

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, June 12, 2013
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Team Six's Proposal for Empire Stores coffee warehouses (Courtesy of Brooklyn Bridge Park)

Team Six’s Proposal for Empire Stores coffee warehouses (Courtesy of Brooklyn Bridge Park)

Proposals galore! Brooklyn Bridge Park (BBP) is moving full speed ahead with its plans to develop parcels of its 1.3-mile waterfront expanse. In September, the Park released a Request for Proposals seeking a developer to restore and makeover the crumbling Empire Stores warehouses into a lively mixed-use development consisting of office, commercial, and retail space, while also preserving the integrity of the massive historic structure.

Continue reading after the jump.

Product> The Comprehensive New York Design Week 2013 Roundup

East, Newsletter, Product
Monday, June 10, 2013
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The Low Collection by 13&9 Design

The Low Collection by 13&9 Design.

New York’s inaugural design week, held from May 10 through 21, was a comprehensive, two-week celebration of all things design across Manhattan island, as well as parts of Brooklyn. Showcasing the latest from industry stalwarts to emerging and independent designers—local, domestic, and international—AN culled its top picks of New York Design Week products from the ICFF show floor, Wanted Design exhibitions, showroom launches, and all events in between. 

The Low Collection
13&9 Design
The multidisciplinary Austrian design studio debuted at Wanted Design with a collection of furniture, wearable fashion and accessories, a cinematic video, and a music album. With the Low Collection (pictured above), Corian is formed into several seating styles that combine with storage vessels, all at ground level. Suitable for outdoors, furniture heights can be modified to generate a unique landscape.

Continue reading after the jump.

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