Review> Rem Koolhaas Designs an Exhibition on the Architect Auguste Perret

International, Newsletter, On View
Wednesday, December 4, 2013
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Exhibition view. (Florian Kleinefenn)

Exhibition view. (Florian Kleinefenn)

Auguste Perret: Eight Masterpieces !/?
Through February 19, 2014

The exhibition, Auguste Perret: Eight Masterpieces !/?, is really about dualities: the subject of the exhibition, the architect Perret (1874-1954), an architectural innovator in reinforced concrete, and the exhibition’s designer Rem Koolhaas/OMA; and the historical perspective of Perret by the “scientific” curator, Joseph Abram, and the forward-looking interpretations by “artistic” curator, Koolhaas. This interplay is symbolized by the exclamation point/question mark at the end of the exhibition title.

Continue reading after the jump.

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With Taipei Sales Center, Oyler Wu Collaborative Marries Architecture and Sculpture

Newsletter, West
Wednesday, December 4, 2013
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OYLER WU COLLABORATIVE TRANSFORMED TWO TAIPEI BUILDINGS INTO A TEMPORARY SALES CENTER FOR THEIR NEW RESIDENTIAL TOWER (OYLER WU COLLABORATIVE)

OYLER WU COLLABORATIVE TRANSFORMED TWO TAIPEI BUILDINGS INTO A TEMPORARY SALES CENTER FOR THEIR NEW RESIDENTIAL TOWER (OYLER WU COLLABORATIVE)

Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu, partners at Los Angeles-based Oyler Wu Collaborative, recently completed an unusual project. The program was seemingly straightforward: create a temporary sales center on the future site of a high-rise residential tower in Taipei, also designed by the firm. The catch? Because they wanted to repurpose two existing structures rather than build the sales center from scratch, the developer restricted Oyler Wu Collaborative’s intervention to the application of seven-inch-thick cladding.

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Oscar Niemeyer’s Latin American Memorial Consumed by Flames

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, December 3, 2013
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Smoke and Flames pour out of Oscare Niemeyer's Latin America Memorial in São Paulo, Brazil (joviannysierascky / Instagram)

Smoke and Flames pour out of Oscare Niemeyer’s Latin America Memorial in São Paulo, Brazil (joviannysierascky / Instagram)

While Americans trampled over each-other for the latest consumer electronics, flames tore through the late Oscar Neimeyer’s landmark Latin America Memorial complex (1987) in São Paulo, Brazil on Friday. Inaugurated in 1989, the complex was built to promote the social, cultural, political and economic integration of Latin America. Eighty-eight firefighters were reportedly dispatched to contain the blaze that consumed portions of the 909,000 square foot complex for up to five hours.

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MIT Media Lab Creates a Digital Interface That Reaches Into the Real World

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, November 20, 2013
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(Courtesy Tangible Media Group / MIT Media Lab)

(Courtesy Tangible Media Group / MIT Media Lab)

Do you dream of a world in which your touch-screen could touch back? Where you can shape digital models with your hands, physically reach out to friends hundreds of miles away, and once again tangibly interact with the people and objects around you?

The Tangible Media Group at MIT’s Media Lab has begun to probe this future of 3D interactive interfaces with their latest creation: inFORM. Functioning similarly to the metal pinscreen toy, inFORM combines a state-of-the-art table-mounted “screen” of 900 movable “pixels,” a hacked Microsoft Kinect, projector, and nearby computer to transmit palpable content back-and-forth between the digital and physical realms.

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Koolhaas’ CCTV Headquarters Crowned Best Tall Building in The World

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, November 19, 2013
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OMA's CCTV Headquarters in Beijing wins Best Tall Building Worldwide (Courtesy CTBUH)

OMA’s CCTV Headquarters in Beijing wins Best Tall Building Worldwide (Courtesy CTBUH)

One World Trade may officially be the tallest building in the West, but according to the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), the honor of the Best Tall Building in the World goes to OMA’s CCTV Headquarters in Beijing–a fitting birthday gift to the architect who previously declared war on the skyscraper (Happy 69th Rem!).

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Is That A Dhow In Your Pocket, Or Just Zaha Hadid’s Stadium Design For The Qatar World Cup?

International, Newsletter
Monday, November 18, 2013
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The design is allegedly based upon the Dhow, a type of Arabian sailing ship. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

The design is allegedly based upon the Dhow, a type of Arabian fishing boat. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid Architects has unveiled its design for a 40,000-seat soccer stadium to rise in the Arabian kingdom of Qatar. The project is slated to be complete in time for the 2022 FIFA World Cup, and is only one of several such facilities that the oil-rich nation plans to build—in addition to miles of roads, a seaport, airport, and a rail system—in a $140 billion spending spree to lay down the infrastructure necessary to support the event and the international crowds it attracts.

Hadid’s office has stated that the design of the stadium is derived from the dhow, a type of fishing vessel that is common among the peoples of the Arabian Peninsula. Several commentators have pointed out, however, that the renderings more closely resemble the mounds, folds, and cavities of a certain very private part of the female anatomy.

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University of Wyoming’s new energy building brings geology to life with 3D visualization lab

Midwest, Newsletter
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
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The University of Wyoming recently opened its new Energy Innovation Center, designed by HOK and GSG Architecture.

The University of Wyoming recently opened its new Energy Innovation Center, designed by HOK and GSG Architecture.

In crafting a building whose main goal is to make the study of natural resources accessible, architects from HOK and GSG did just that: they brought the outside in.

Its purpose is to study what’s buried beneath the earth’s surface, but the University of Wyoming’s Energy Innovation Center isn’t an underground bunker. Read More

Clemson Architecture Celebrates 100 Years of Critical Regionalism with Symposium

Dean's List, East, Newsletter
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
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(Courtesy Clemson University)

(Courtesy Clemson University)

On Friday, October 18th, an important symposium took place commemorating the Centennial Celebration of Clemson University School of Architecture.

Located in Clemson, South Carolina, an idyllic college town halfway between Atlanta and Charlotte, and serving as the only School of Architecture in the state, the leadership of the school has historically created a curriculum that balances service to its home state and connections to the wider world. In fact, the “Fluid Campus” has become a hallmark of the institution with almost all of the students, undergraduate and graduate, spending at least one semester at one of three urban satellite campuses: Genoa, Italy; Barcelona, Spain; and Charleston, South Carolina.

Southern Roots + Global Reach,” a year of events commemorating this spirit, culminated with the Centennial Symposium: “The Architecture of Regionalism in the age of Globalism.” Organized by Director of Graduate Studies, Peter Laurence, with the support of Kate Schwennsen, former AIA president and chair of the School of Architecture, the event sought to deepen our definition of critical regionalism in an era of expanded global diversity.

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Sou Fujimoto’s Outlook Tower is a Stacked Mirage in Saudi Arabia

International, Newsletter
Monday, November 11, 2013
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SOU FUJIMOTO (COURTESY GA: SOU FUJIMOTO - RECENT PROJECT)

SOU FUJIMOTO’S OUTLOOK TOWER (COURTESY GA: SOU FUJIMOTO – RECENT PROJECT)

Tokyo-based architect and creator of this year’s Serpentine Pavilion, Sou Fujimoto, has recently unveiled his latest rendering of Outlook Tower and Water Plaza, a proposal that’s part of his master plan development for the coastal resort district of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. His proposed 473,612-square-foot structure is based on a vernacular type of Islamic architecture and mirrors the shape of Bedouin tents. Seen from afar, their silhouettes are designed to form the shape of a mirage-like gateway linking the mainland to the sea.

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Public Art Fund Installation Creates a Colorful Terrain in Brooklyn

City Terrain, East, Newsletter
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
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(Courtesy Public Art Fund)

Just Two of Us by Katharina Grosse is a sculptural landscape of color in downtown Brooklyn. (Courtesy Public Art Fund / Flickr )

Amidst the trees of MetroTech Commons in downtown Brooklyn, a vibrant architectural terrain has been formed. In an installation piece called Just Two of Us, Berlin-based artist Katharina Grosse has situated eighteen large, multi-colored sculptural forms in the wooded public space. Sponsored by the Public Art Fund, the work creates a surprising show of colors and a form that walks the line between sculpture, architecture, and painting.

View the Gallery After the Jump.

Unbuilt Frank Lloyd Wright House Constructed at Florida Southern College

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
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(Courtesy Florida Southern / Flickr)

(Courtesy Florida Southern / Flickr)

A never-before-built Frank Lloyd Wright house has been painstakingly constructed on its original site at Florida Southern College. The 1700-square-foot Usonian house, designed by Wright in 1939 as modest faculty housing, is the 13th structure by the renowned architect to be built on Florida Southern’s campus, but the first since Wright’s death in 1959.

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Five Paul Rudolph Buildings Under Threat in Buffalo

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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Paul Rudolph's Shoreline Apartments in Buffalo, New York (Kelvin Dickinson / Flickr)

Paul Rudolph’s Shoreline Apartments in Buffalo, New York (Kelvin Dickinson / Flickr)

2013 has proven to be a difficult year for post-war concrete architecture. While some iconic structures have managed to emerge from the maelstrom of demolition attempts unharmed, including M. Paul Friedberg’s Peavy Plaza in Minneapolis and (tentatively) the Paul Rudolph–designed Orange County Government Center in Goshen, New York (the fate of which still remains uncertain), others have been less lucky.

John Johansen’s daring Mummers Theater in Oklahoma City, Richard Neutra’s Gettysburg Cyclorama and, more recently, Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Woman’s Hospital in Chicago have all been doomed to the wrecking ball. Despite architectural historian Michael R. Allen’s claim that the demolition of the Prentice’ Woman’s Hospital would be Modernism’s “Penn Station Moment,” the trend still pushes on.

The next in line to fight for its survival is a set of Paul Rudolph buildings in Buffalo, New York. Tomorrow, November 6, at 8:15 a.m., the Buffalo City Planning Board will convene to decide the fate of five buildings included in Rudolph’s 9.5-acre Shoreline Apartment complex.

Continue reading after the jump.

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