Cleveland Leads U.S. Cities in Bus Rapid Transit

Midwest, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 12, 2013
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Cleveland's Health Line BRT System. (Roger DuPuis / Flickr)

Cleveland’s Health Line BRT System. (Roger DuPuis / Flickr)

Cleveland was the only U.S. city to earn a “Silver Standard” ranking from the Institute for Transportation & Development Policy (ITDP) in its second annual bus rapid transit corridor rankings. Cleveland’s HealthLine, formerly The Euclid Corridor, is a 9.2 mile transit corridor connecting Downtown, University Circle, and East Cleveland with 40 stops along the way. Hybrid articulated buses ferry passengers 24-7, and have brought billions of dollars of investment to the city’s key economic centers.

Guangzhou, China topped the “Gold Standard” list, with Latin American cities (Bogotá, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro, Lima, Guadalajara, and Medellin) monopolizing the rest of those rankings. Some North American cities made the “Bronze Standard” list: Los Angeles; Eugene, OR; Pittsburgh; Las Vegas; and Ottawa.

Miami’s Development Booming: Top 11 Starchitect-Designs Remaking the Magic City

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 12, 2013
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The Grove at Grand Bay by Bjarke Ingels Group. (Courtesy BIG)

The Grove at Grand Bay by Bjarke Ingels Group. (Courtesy BIG)

After a tumultuous few years, Miami’s real estate market is on the rise once again. When the recession hit the city in 2007, new developments came to a dramatic halt and abandoned construction sites became ubiquitous. But now, a surge of new projects—running the gamut from residential and retail to hotels and cultural institutions—are cropping up around Miami with many more slated for construction in the next few years. And some heavy hitters, such as Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Herzog and de Meuron, and Bjarke Ingels, have signed up to lend their design sensibility to Miami’s changing landscape. The Miami Herald reported that the city now boasts 20 new condo towers with an additional five towers in the works for neighborhoods just north and south of downtown Miami. AN has compiled a list of the most significant projects taking shape in the Magic City.

Continue reading after the jump.

Doug Aitken to Wrap The Seattle Art Museum With LED Video Art Screen

Newsletter, West
Monday, March 11, 2013
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Seattle is about to get a new public art installation on the walls of SAM, the Seattle Art Museum. The museum that created the nearby Olympic Sculpture Park—one of the best public art spaces in the country—has commissioned artist Doug Aitken to install a new reflective wall on the corner of their building at First Avenue and Union Street. Aitken calls the wall installation Mirror and it is meant to “reflect the energy and movement of the city.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Van on Van: Guggenheim Curator to Lead Van Alen Institute

East, Newsletter, Shft+Alt+Del
Tuesday, March 5, 2013
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David van der Leer. (David Heald / Courtesy BMW Guggenheim Lab)

David van der Leer. (David Heald / Courtesy BMW Guggenheim Lab)

David van der Leer, an associate curator of architecture and urban studies at the Guggenheim, has been appointed executive director of New York’s Van Alen Institute. He will take over in May. The Institute, which has existed for more than 100 years in various forms, is dedicated to improving the public realm through exhibitions, competitions, and programming initiatives in New York and beyond. Reached by email, van der Leer declined to elaborate on his plans for the Institute.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City to Match Sandy-Damaged Buildings With Design Professionals

East, Newsletter
Friday, March 1, 2013
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Houses in Rockaways after Hurricane Sandy (Courtesy of Anique/Ma Neek/Flickr)

Houses in Rockaways after Hurricane Sandy. (Anique/Ma Neek/Flickr)

For property owners of Hurricane Sandy-ravaged buildings, the road to recovery just got easier. Starting on Monday, the New York City Department of Buildings (DOB) will offer a new program that provides design consultations to property owners and design professionals who want to reconstruct their buildings. Department officials and technical experts will explain the building code and zoning requirements for properties in special flood hazard areas, as indicated on insurance rate maps or on updated Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) maps.

According to the announcement from the DOB: “This program is designed to accelerate the approval process for these projects, assist homeowners with their decisions on reconstruction and better ensure that new flood recommendations and standards are incorporated into the design and construction of these affected buildings.”

The consultations will be held at the Department’s NYC Development Hub at 80 Centre Street in Manhattan. Property owners will sit down with officials and compile a list of recommendations to apply to the construction plans that they intend on submitting to the DOB.

Frank Gehry Unveils Mixed-Use Tower For Santa Monica

Newsletter, West
Friday, March 1, 2013
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Frank Gehry's 22-story tower for Santa Monica. (Courtesy Gehry Partners)

Frank Gehry’s 22-story tower for Santa Monica. (Courtesy Gehry Partners)

OMA and Robert A.M. Stern are not the only starchitects zeroing in on Santa Monica. Frank Gehry is designing a 22-story, 244-foot-tall tower on a 1.9 acre site on the corner of Ocean Avenue and Santa Monica Boulevard.  Plans for the project were submitted to the city yesterday, according to the  Santa Monica Planning Department. The tower, located just a block from the beach and around the corner from the 3rd Street Promenade, would house a 125-room hotel, 22 condos, and two stories of retail and restaurants.  A 36,000-square-foot art museum, incorporating two landmarked structures, would also be built just north of the tower.

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Smithsonian Taps Bjarke Ingels For DC Campus Master Plan

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, February 26, 2013
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In the courtyard at the Hirshhorn Museum with Bjarke Ingels. (Holley St. Germain / Flickr; Montage by AN)

In the courtyard at the Hirshhorn Museum with Bjarke Ingels. (Holley St. Germain / Flickr; Montage by AN)

Since announcing his first North American project in New York and opening an office in the Big Apple, BIG-founder Bjarke Ingels has been moving fast. His meteoric ascent into a Danish-American icon is happening so quickly, that the starchitect has landed himself in the Smithsonian, in a manner of speaking. The venerable institution has just hired Ingels to prepare a master plan for the museum’s Washington, D.C. campus, and we’re left wondering if that might mean a new mountain range rising off the National Mall.

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NYCHA’s Green Thumb: New Affordable Housing Complex Opens With Rooftop Farm

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, February 26, 2013
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(Courtesy NYC Housing Development Corporation)

(Courtesy NYC Housing Development Corporation)

It has been a rocky few months for the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), but the battered agency finally has some good news to report. State officials announced the opening of the Arbor House, a 124-unit affordable housing complex, located in the Morrisania section of the Bronx, that is not only LEED Platinum certified, but also features a hydroponic farm on the roof that supplies residents and the surrounding community with fresh produce. Built from local and recycled materials, the 8-story building was designed by New York-based ABS Architecture and includes a living green wall installation in the lobby, air-filtration systems, and indoor and outdoor exercise areas.

Continue reading after the jump.

3Doodle Pen Combines Napkin Brainstorming with 3D Printing

International, Newsletter
Monday, February 25, 2013
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3d-pen-01

It’s as much a part of the architect’s image as a drafting desk or a T-square: sitting around a table with a client when the moment of inspiration hits and the first image of a new building is hastily scrawled on a napkin. But why limit yourself to two dimensions in hatching your new idea? In the age of 3D printing, the napkin sketch could be completely transformed by a new instant-prototyper: the 3Doodler pen, which would allow you to draw your idea in real time rising up from the tabletop. And the public seems eager to give it a try, already contributing over $1.8 million to the 3D-printing pen on Kickstarter with nearly a month left to go.

Continue reading after the jump.

Wallace Roberts & Todd Designs Affordable Housing for LGBT Seniors in Philadelphia

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, February 20, 2013
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Rendering of the John C. Anderson Apartments. (Courtesy WRT)

Rendering of the John C. Anderson Apartments. (Courtesy WRT)

A new affordable housing project designed by Wallace Roberts & Todd (WRT) is in the works for Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender (LGBT) seniors in the City of Brotherly Love—it will be the second of its kind in the nation. Hidden Philadelphia reported that construction on this 56-unit complex, called the John C. Anderson Apartments, has already commenced and will be located on 13th Street right in the heart of the Washington Square West neighborhood, a part of Philadelphia that has long been home to a gay and lesbian community. The development is named after city councilman John C. Anderson who was “instrumental in the passage of Philadelphia’s civil rights bill for sexual minority people.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Christoph Ingenhoven to Deliver Keynote at Facades + PERFORMANCE

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, February 20, 2013
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Atrium of 1 Bligh Street, Christoph Ingenhoven's sustainable office tower in Sydney.

Atrium of 1 Bligh Street, Christoph Ingenhoven’s sustainable office tower in Sydney. (Courtesy Ingenhoven Architects)

“I think contemporary work environments are about communication. We tried to make interior space a community, “ said architect Christoph Ingenhoven of 1 Bligh Street, a sustainable office tower completed a little over a year ago in Sydney. Ingenhoven translated his idea of community into a building defined by a spectacular 28-story interior atrium capped by a skylight. With interior walls and elevators of glass, every view is a living, bustling cross-section. The atrium acts as natural cooling system while other green features include vacuum tube solar collectors for power and an onsite wastewater recycling system, adding up to a structure that is off the charts for its energy efficiency and low environmental impact.

Ingenhoven, recognized for his groundbreaking integration of progressive sustainability and modernist design, will deliver the keynote lecture on April 11 at Facades + PERFORMANCE, an upcoming conference on high-performance building enclosures sponsored by The Architect’s Newspaper. At the two-day event including a symposium and workshops, experts in the industry will analyze, discuss, and dispute the development, implementation, and maintenance of facades. Registration information available hereRead More

Slideshow> New York Subway Construction Creates Enormous Cathedrals of Transit

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, February 19, 2013
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Manhattan's East Side Access Tunnel will connect the Long Island Railroad with Grand Central Terminal. (Courtesy MTA)

Manhattan’s East Side Access Tunnel will connect the Long Island Railroad with Grand Central Terminal. (Courtesy MTA / Patrick Cashin)

There’s plenty of tunneling going on underneath the streets of Manhattan. On the west side, digging through the city’s bedrock has given way to interior station fit-ups for the Dattner-designed 7 line subway stations connecting Times Square to Hudson Yards as early as 2014. To the east, sandhogs continue to carve through solid rock for the $4.5 billion Second Avenue Subway Line while other crews outfit the tunnels with concrete and rebar.

Between the two, more massive caverns are being opened up beneath Grand Central Terminal, which turned 100 this month, that will extend the Long Island Railroad to the famed station from Sunnyside, Queens in 2019. The $8.24 billion East Side Access Project will allow commuters to bypass Penn Station and enter Manhattan 12-stories below Grand Central. Now, the MTA has released a dramatic set of photos from inside the 3.5-mile-long tunnel, revealing enormous cathedral-like spaces connected by perfectly cylindrical tunnels. Take a look.

View the slideshow after the jump.

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