Karim Rashid tones down colorful and controversial Harlem development

Architecture, East, News, Newsletter
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
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karim-rashid-HAP5_update

The original design and the new design with a less colorful facade, right. (Courtesy Karim Rashid / HAP Investment Developers)

When Karim Rashid unveiled his plans for Hap 5—a residential building in East Harlem that had fluorescent pink and turquoise balconies—there were, how should we put this, some detractors. Turns out, the the community wasn’t a huge fan of Rashid’s, let’s just say, vibrant color scheme.

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Faith Rose tapped as Executive Director of New York City’s Public Design Commission

Faith Rose, the new Executive Director of the Public Design Commission. (Courtesy

Faith Rose, the new Executive Director of the Public Design Commission. (Courtesy o’neill rose architects)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has appointed Faith Rose, a former senior design liaison at the Department of Design and Construction (DDC), to lead the city’s Public Design Commission. According to the mayor’s office, in her new role, Rose “will be charged with building on the Public Design Commission’s history of prioritizing the quality and excellence of the public realm, enhancing and streamlining the Commission’s review process, and fostering accessibility, diversity and inclusion in the City’s public buildings and spaces.”

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New Jersey goes Brooklyn with new sustainable food hall

Outdoor beer garden.  (Courtesy MABU Design)

Outdoor beer garden. (Courtesy MABU Design)

You can’t keep artisanal pickles, earthy micro-brews, and locally-sourced popsicle sticks in Brooklyn forever. At a certain point, these gluten-free, all-vegan treats are going to want to explore the world beyond Williamsburg. Like so many Brooklyn residents before them, they’re headed for New Jersey

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MVRDV’s enormous arched food hall and housing complex opens in Rotterdam

Markthal Rotterdam. (Courtesy facebook.com/MarkthalRotterdam)

Markthal Rotterdam. (Courtesy facebook.com/MarkthalRotterdam)

When the plan for Markthal Rotterdam first appeared, it seemed like one of those interesting, but never going to actually happen type of projects. There was no way that MVRDV’s sprawling food hall set underneath a 130-foot-tall arching roof that itself contains 228 apartments would ever be realized. Well, it turns out there was a way, and Rotterdam figured it out.

Continue reading after the jump.

Talking tall buildings in Shanghai

In September the Chicago-based Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) gathered high-minded designers, developers and engineers for a conference in Shanghai. CTBUH, which often partners with AN on conferences, including our own Facades+ events, invited me to serve as a special media correspondent for the conference, held September 16–19. I spent most of the time conducting video interviews with the symposium guests, which we’ll post here on the AN blog as they become available. For now, here’ a quick overview of the topics discussed.

Continue reading after the jump.

Another Brutalist Wonder Bites the Dust: Johansen’s Mechanic Theatre

Mechanic Theatre in Baltimore (photo: Edward Gunts)

Despite pleas for preservation from some of the nation’s top architects, demolition work has begun on  a nationally significant example of “Brutalist” architecture in north America, the 1967 Morris A. Mechanic Theatre in Baltimore, Maryland, designed by the late John M. Johansen.

A  yellow backhoe with a spike-like attachment began chipping into the theater’s concrete exterior earlier this month, ending any chance that the building could be saved. One local preservationist was able to salvage the original letters from the  building, but nothing else. Read More

Bjarke Ingels returns to Denmark with “Aarhus Island”

Aarhus Island at night. (Courtesy BIG via Design Boom)

Aarhus Island at night. (Courtesy BIG via Design Boom)

With Bjarke Ingels’ pyramid-like tower—dubbed the “courtscraper”—rising quickly on Manhattan’s West Side, the globe-trotting architect has unveiled plans for his latest sloping project. And this one has the Dane back in Denmark. In his home country, in the city of Aarhus, Bjarke has created “Aarhus Island,” a mixed-use development along the water.

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On View> Roxy Paine’s “Denuded Lens” at New York’s Marianne Boesky Gallery

Art, East, Newsletter, On View
Monday, September 22, 2014
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(Courtesy Marianne Boesky Gallery)

(Courtesy Marianne Boesky Gallery)

Roxy Paine: Denuded Lens
Marianne Boesky Gallery
509 West 24th Street, New York
Through October 18

The artist Roxy Paine has long been interested in exploring combinations of the natural with the mechanical or manmade. In his latest exhibition, his first at the Marianne Boesky Gallery, called Denuded Lens, he has created a large-scale diorama of one of the more mundane but intrusive spaces of contemporary life: the airport security screening area.

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Marlon Blackwell on the Power of Everyday Design

Marlon Blackwell Architects' Vol Walker Hall and Steven L. Anderson Design Center. (Timothy Hursley)

Marlon Blackwell Architects’ Vol Walker Hall and Steven L. Anderson Design Center. (Timothy Hursley)

Marlon Blackwell, principal of Marlon Blackwell Architects and distinguished professor and department head at the Fay Jones School of Architecture at the University of Arkansas, practices in Fayetteville, Arkansas, where the temptation to design according to a derivative vernacular—and the risk of descending into quaintness—is great. Blackwell seeks instead to operate in the space between the vernacular and the universal, to create buildings that are simultaneously both and neither. “What emerges is something that I like to call the strangely familiar,” he said. “We’re working with forms in a cultural context that have a first reading of being familiar, but on a second, third, or fourth reading are clearly transgressive to either the local typology or the vernacular. What we try to do is kind of de-typify things—it’s really about trying to find or develop an idea about performative surfaces.” Read More

Manhattan’s Rizzoli Bookstore to Reopen in the Flatiron District

East, News, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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The new home of the Rizzoli Bookstore. (Courtesy Google)

The new home of the Rizzoli Bookstore. (Courtesy Google)

New York’s iconic Rizzoli Bookstore has found a new home. After its former location on 57th Street was demolished to make way for the thoroughfare’s latest super-tall luxury building, it seemed that it was end days for the beloved institution. At the time, Rizzoli’s owners said the store would open up shop elsewhere in the city, but given the current state of affairs for old-school bookstores, that seemed highly unlikely.

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Bright public art installation to light up New York City’s cold, dark winter

Art, City Terrain, Design, East, Lighting, Newsletter
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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New York Light and the Flatiron Building. (Courtesy INABA)

New York Light and the Flatiron Building. (Courtesy INABA)

The summer is officially over, folks. The beaches are closed, the sun is switching to its seasonal, part-time schedule, and your coworkers are drinking Pumpkin Spice Lattes again. There is no ignoring an inevitable truth: winter is coming and there is nothing you can do about it. Well, if you live up north that is. You could move to Florida, but beyond that, there is nothing you can do about it. For those of us stuck in New York City this holiday season, it’s not all bad news. We will soon be able to feast our frostbitten eyes on a new public art installation in front of the Flatiron Building.

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Sou Fujimoto’s Marcus Prize Pavilion transforms brick into a playfully light material

Architecture, National, Newsletter
Monday, September 15, 2014
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(Courtesy University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)

(Courtesy University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)

The Marcus Prize is awarded bi-annually to an emerging architect in the early stages of his or her career. Hosted by the the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee School of Architecture & Urban Planning and supported by the Milwaukee-based Marcus Foundation, it has a record of supporting talented young practices before they become well know including: Winy Maas (2005), Frank Barkow (2007), Alejandro Aravena (2010), and Diebedo Francis Kere (2011).

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