How New York’s “Poor Door” was allowed to exist in the first place

40 Riverside's facade. (Courtesy Extell)

40 Riverside’s facade. (Courtesy Extell)

In the past week, those two words—”poor door”—have quickly come to signify the vast inequality embedded in New York City’s housing market. At issue is a separate entrance for tenants living in subsidized rental units in a luxury condo building on the Upper West Side known as 40 Riverside. The property, developed by Extell, was financed through the city’s inclusionary housing program, which grants a tax abatement and additional bulk to developers who include a certain portion of “affordable” units in a project.

Continue reading after the jump.

MAD Architects, Studio Gang, VOA to design Chicago’s George Lucas Museum

The lakefront site, outlined in white, proposed for Chicago's George Lucas Museum of Narrative Art. (Courtesy City of Chicago from Lucas Museum task force report)

The lakefront site, outlined in white, proposed for Chicago’s George Lucas Museum of Narrative Art. (Courtesy City of Chicago from Lucas Museum task force report)

MAD Architects, the Chinese designers known for their organically curving buildings from Mongolia to Canada, will work with two local firms—including Studio Gang Architects—to bring filmmaker George Lucas’ new Chicago museum to life. Read More

Foster + Partners Reveal Initial Renderings for San Francisco Tower

The Foster tower is the third tower on the right. (Courtesy TMG & Foster +Partners)

The Foster tower is the third tower on the right. (Courtesy TMG & Foster + Partners)

The latest playground for big-name architecture is San Francisco’s Transbay District. As AN reported this spring, the city’s forthcoming Transbay Transit Center has spurred new projects from some of the field’s biggest names, including OMA, Studio Gang, Cesar Pelli, and Foster + Partners. Less than two weeks after Studio Gang revealed plans for its twisting tower in the district, Foster + Partners is out with some images of its own. Don’t get too excited—they’re fairly vague—but they were enough for San Francisco Chronicle architecture critic John King to call Foster’s plan, “gasp-inducing…from the ground up.”

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Official Renderings Unveiled for Koolhaas’ Miami Condos Towers

The towers. (Courtesy OMA)

The towers. (Courtesy OMA)

And you can now add Rem Koolhaas to the ever-growing list of starchitects designing luxury condos in Miami. Curbed Miami recently attended the unveiling of the Dutchman’s luxury project at Coconut Grove, which is rising conspicuously close to a project by his former student, Bjarke Ingels. Conspicuously close. But since this is Miami, Koolhaas was not the only starchitect vying for the project, known as Park Grove. He had to beat proposals from Christian de Portzamparc, Jean Nouvel, and Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

Continue reading after the jump.

Local Group Tries to Block Affordable Housing at Brooklyn Bridge Park

Development sites at Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Courtesy Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy)

Development sites at Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Courtesy Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy)

As AN covered earlier this month, Mayor de Blasio’s plan to bring affordable housing to Brooklyn Bridge Park has received steep opposition from local groups in neighboring Brooklyn Heights. They contend new housing development will eat up public space and that under-market housing would not provide necessary funding for park maintenance. Under a Bloomberg-era plan, revenue from private, market-rate development would help cover upkeep at the Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates-designed park. Under de Blasio, 30 percent of the two proposed towers for the park–one 31 stories and the other 16–would be subsidized. The groups opposing that plan have now formalized their opposition against it.

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Deborah Berke, SHoP, Tod Williams Billie Tsien to compete for new Cummins’ Indianapolis headquarters

(Jay Denney via Flickr)

(Jay Denney via Flickr)

Engine manufacturer Cummins Corporation announced plans for a new regional headquarters in Indianapolis Monday, but the Columbus, Indiana–based Fortune 500 company won’t look to local design talent to lead the project. Instead, three of the country’s leading names—all based in New York City—will compete for the project.

Continue reading after the jump.

From fireworks to kayaks, step inside the well-produced world of renderings

Some more birds and some more kayaks. (Courtesy SCAPE)

Lots of birds and lots of kayaks. (Courtesy SCAPE)

In the idealized world of architectural renderings, everything is absolutely perfect. There are no dirty windows, no rust, no clutter, no dead leaves, no mud, no rain. There are crowds, but nothing is crowded. There are cars, but there is no traffic. The scalies dropped into these polished scenes are as happy  as can be—why wouldn’t they be? Every day is spent walking hand-in-hand down a boardwalk with a loved-one giggling about a Jeff Koons sculpture over there. Life is good, they think, as fireworks explode behind them. Life is good.

When you spend as much time as we do here at AN sifting through these highly-planned digital worlds, some trends start to appear over and over. Here’s a sample of what we see again and again.

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Unveiled> Jeanne Gang doing the Twist in San Francisco with new skyscraper

Thanks to changes in its bays, Gang's planned San Francisco Tower appears to torque as it rises. (Tishman Speyer)

Thanks to changes in the angeles of its bays, Gang’s planned San Francisco Tower appears to torque as it rises. (Tishman Speyer)

We’ve known for some time that Chicago architect and certified genius Jeanne Gang has been planning a residential tower for San Francisco‘s Transbay District, south of Market Street. Now we know what it will look like. Gang and developer Tishman Speyer have revealed renderings of a 400-foot-tall, 40-story building clad in masonry tiles at 160 Folsom Street.

Continue reading after the jump.

Parisian preschool stays light and airy with an undulating glass facade screen

(Julien Attard)

This exterior shell enables light to penetrate into the building; it undulates slightly to indicate the entrances. (Julien Attard)

French architecture firm H20 Architectes has given light to a nursery school sited in an unusually tight and narrow courtyard site in Paris. Located in the shadow of surrounding buildings, the new facility has been designed with a glass facade and corresponding shade canopy that appears to lift effortlessly at the front entrance, belying its rigid construction.

Continue reading after the jump.

And Now A Gehry Tower For LACMA? What’s Next?

Model of Zumthor's newest scheme for LACMA, along with massing study of new tower. (Courtesy LACMA)

Model of Zumthor’s newest scheme for LACMA, along with massing study of new tower. (Courtesy LACMA)

The surprises keep coming at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). After learning that the museum plans to shift its proposed Peter Zumthor–designed building southward (partially bridging Wilshire Boulevard) to avoid damaging the La Brea Tar Pits, now comes news that the museum is hoping to partner with LA’s transit agency, METRO, to build a tower across the street.

Read More

Have World Cup Fever? Second World Cup Stadium revealed for Qatar 2022

International, Newsletter
Thursday, July 10, 2014
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World-Cup-Qatar-Al-Bayt-Stadium-Archpaper

With the U.S. knocked out of the World Cup, true fans already are dreaming of our next opportunity to enter the final four. Qatar, which won the bid to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, has added detail to what one of those future venues might look like by revealing renderings for its latest soccer venue. The Al Bayt Stadium is modeled after a traditional nomadic tent.

Continue reading after the jump.

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