Portuguese architect Ines Lobo wins second annual arcVision prize

Awards, International, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
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Single family house in Magoito

A single family house in Magoito designed by 2014 arcVision prize winner Ines Lobo (Courtesy Ines Lobo)

The 2014 arcVision Prize, an international architecture award for female designers, was bestowed upon Ines Lobo. The Portuguese architect emerged from a short list of 21 nominees representing 15 countries. Lobo has focused the majority of her practice on her native country, where she also teaches at the Autonoma University in Lisbon. Since founding her own firm in 2002, Lobo has been most prolific in the public realm, designing the Art and Architecture Facility for Evora University and a number of secondary schools throughout Portugal. Anna Heringer of Switzerland, Shimul Javeri Kadri of India and Cecilia Puga from Chile were also tabbed for special mention. Brazilian architect Carla Juaçaba was the recipient of the inaugural arcVision Prize after Italcementi created the award in 2013.

Pioneering British Supermarket Appears Destined for an Early Demise

SAINSBURY6

(Courtesy Chetwoods Architects)

A British supermarket once lauded for its ingenuity and pioneering nature is now on the chopping block with a Swedish invader looming. When it was completed, the Greenwich branch of UK Mega-chain Sainsbury’s was hailed as a breakthrough in eco-design and shortlisted for a prestigious Stirling Prize. Yet in early March the city council approved plans to demolish the structure in order to pave the way for a new IKEA warehouse outlet.

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Art Installation Casts NYC Water Towers in Infinite Light

Art, East, Newsletter
Monday, March 10, 2014
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msp8_archpaper

(Photo by James Ewing Photography/Courtesy Madison Park Conservancy)

By the New York Times’ estimate, there are some 12,000–17,000 water towers currently in use within New York City. Frequent hosts for sediment and even harmful bacteria, Ivan Navarro has found a new substance for filling these ubiquitous components of the city skyline: neon light. The material is the Chilean artist’s preferred medium, and in a new installation in Madison Square Park he has rendered the words “we” “me”, and a ladder on the interiors of three separate water towers.

More images after the jump.

Loopy Alternative for New York’s Organic Waste

Greenloop_archpaper1

(Courtesy PRESENT Architecture)

For as long as societies have produced trash, they has sought to jettison said trash into whatever water is most convenient, polluting lakes, creeks, and rivers along the way. PRESENT Architecture wants to harness this impulse in order to construct Green Loop, a series of composting islands along the coasts of Manhattan and the city’s other boroughs. Each topped by a public park, the floating facilities would offer a more productive and cost-effective means of processing the city’s large quantities of organic waste.

More after the jump.

After Record-Breaking Concrete Pour in Los Angeles, Wilshire Grand Reaches for the Sky

THE $1.1 BILLION WILSHIRE GRAND IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN DOWNTOWN LA (AC MARTIN)

THE $1.1 BILLION WILSHIRE GRAND IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN DOWNTOWN LA (AC MARTIN)

The Wilshire Grand, a 73-story tower under construction in downtown Los Angeles, hasn’t yet risen out of the ground, but it’s already in the Guinness Book of World Records. That’s thanks to a February 15–16 event promoters called the Grand Pour, in which construction crews poured 21,200 cubic yards (82 million pounds) of concrete in 18 hours—the largest continuous concrete pour in history.

Why all the fuss?

Grains to Galleries: Heatherwick design converts South African silos into a cathedral for art

V&A Heatherwick

(Courtesy Heatherwick Studio)

A monolithic cluster of concrete silos on the Cape Town waterfront is the subject of a dramatic surgical intervention. The industrial relic will be transformed by Thomas Heatherwick into an art museum planned for the city’s V&A Waterfront. The project entails the conversion of the grain silo complex into a new space to house and display the Jochen Zeitz Collection, an assortment of art that will act as the foundation for Zeitz MOCAA a non-profit institution dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora.

More after the jump.

Aqua Tower team dives back in for new Chicago project by Studio Gang

studio gang architects' aqua tower (joevare via flickr)

Detail of the rippling facade of Studio Gang Architects’ Aqua Tower. (joevare / Flickr)

With the real estate market drifting through a relative recovery, one prominent Chicago developer seems to be saying, “Come back in, the water’s fine.” The team behind Chicago’s Aqua Tower is gearing up for another high-rise nearby. Chicago-based Magellan Development Group hired Studio Gang Architects for another tower in the 28-acre master-planned neighborhood of Lakeshore East.

Continue reading after the jump.

Merging Modernity Into Nature: Bjarke Ingels Takes A Trip to the Bahamas

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy BIG)

Albany Bahamas Resort Honeycomb Building
Architect: BIG + HKS + MDA
Location: Albany Bahamas
Client: New Providence, The Bahamas
Completion: TBD

A team comprised of the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), HKS, and MDA has unveiled its design for the Honeycomb building at the Albany Bahamas resort. This 175,000-square-foot private residential building takes its name from its hexagonal facade, which mimics the naturally occurring shapes in the coral reefs found off the shores of New Providence. When completed, it will be the tallest structure on the island.

Continue reading after the jump.

Impressive Shortlist for New Dutch Cultural Center Revealed

International, Newsletter
Monday, March 3, 2014
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Arnhem, Netherlands is in the midst of commissioning designs for ArtA, a new cultural center planned for the city. Proposals from an impressive list of four international firms are being considered for the space, which is to house the Museum Arnhem and the Focus Film Theater. Beyond accommodating both exhibition and theater programming, the structure is also meant to act as a link between the city and the waterfront of the adjacent Rhine River.

All the proposals after the jump.

BridgeHOUSE Reusing Steel From Old Bay Bridge

Newsletter, Sustainability, West
Friday, February 28, 2014
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A rendering of the Bay Bridge House.

A rendering of the Bay Bridge House. (Baybridgehouse.org)

Since the east span of the Bay Bridge opened in the fall of 2013, demolition crews have been busy deconstructing the old–taking down over 50,000 tons of steel. While most of the steel will be sent to China as scrap, one Bay Area entrepreneur, David Grieshaber, wants to save a portion to create a mixed-use building, housing a museum, a private apartment, and an Airbnb rental. The Airbnb fees would, hypothetically, keep the non-profit undertaking running.  Read More

Shigeru Ban’s Aspen Art Museum Set To Open This Summer

Newsletter, Southwest
Wednesday, February 26, 2014
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Rendering of Aspen Art Museum. (Shigeru Ban Architects)

Rendering of Aspen Art Museum. (Shigeru Ban Architects)

For those traveling the architecture/museum circuit, one of the next important excursions is definitely Shigeru Ban‘s Aspen Art Museum, which will open in August. Located in the city’s downtown core, this will be Ban’s first U.S. Museum. The building’s gridded composite facade allows for open views inside, inviting people inside and filling the interior (including 14-foot-tall galleries) with natural light. Inside a three-level grand staircase ascends past two ground floor galleries, sandwiched between the exterior grid and the interior structure. Art will be displayed here on mobile pedestals. Read More

Review> 2014 Sundance Film Festival

International, Newsletter, Review
Wednesday, February 26, 2014
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“The future never existed, only the present.”—Paolo Soleri in Doug Aitken’s The Source

At the 2014 Sundance Film Festival last month, visitors were constantly reminded of architecture. The introductory bumper played before every single screened film featured a digitally-mapped projection on the facade of the Egyptian Theater, an art deco cinema on Park City, Utah‘s Main Street. Created by Klip Collective and filmed in July 2013, images of signature Sundance movie posters from the last 30 years flash by on vitrines, film titles cycle on the marquee, characters like Jay and Silent Bob step out from the walls, and much of the facade is divided into mini-screens. Architectural elements such as the columns, capitals, and entablature are outlined and patterned in colored lights.

Continue reading after the jump.

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