Perkins+Will Eyes Platinum on a Budget

East, Newsletter
Thursday, September 13, 2012
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A rendering of the stair atrium, shows region where the teaching wing meets the research wing.

A rendering of the stair atrium, shows region where the teaching wing meets the research wing.

Next month Lehman College CUNY will dedicate its $70 million Science Hall designed by Perkins+Will. The new Bronx facility will abut Gillet Hall, one of the campus’ depression-era gothic buildings, while sparring with Raphael Viñoly’s massive metallic wave-like gymnasium called the Apex. “We tried an elegant yet simple form that enhances the sculptural quality of the Viñoly building, so as not to try to compete against it, but to act as a foil,” said Robert Goodwin, design director at Perkins+Will. “And we maintained a strong relationship to Gillet Hall.”

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A Wall of Pixels Comes To Life in The Hyper-Matrix

International, Newsletter
Thursday, September 13, 2012
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(Courtesy DesignBoom)

(Courtesy DesignBoom)

Imagine taking the fundamental unit of digital imaging—the pixel—and making it a dynamic part of physical reality. This is precisely what Seoul-based media arts group Jonpasang accomplished at the 2012 Hyundai Motor Group Exhibition. Comprised of what at first appear to be three blank white walls, Jonpasang’s Hyper-Matrix installation quickly comes to life as thousands of individual cubic units forming a field of pixels begin to move, pulsate, and form dynamic images across the room.

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On View> Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 12, 2012
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(Courtesy Guggenheim / Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation)

(Courtesy Guggenheim / Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation)

A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s
Usonian House and Pavilion
Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
Through February 13, 2013

In the years just before Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum forever altered the face Fifth Avenue, the directors of the museum went on a charm offensive. In 1953, they presented the exhibition Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright. The show introduced Wright’s Usonian House to New Yorkers by building the Prairie-style home on the construction site of where the architect’s tour de force museum would soon rise. Now through February 13 the museum presents a scaled-down version of the exhibition, which originally included the Usonian and a dramatic Wright-designed pavilion holding models, drawings, and watercolors by the master. This exhibition, A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion, celebrates the two structures that won over a somewhat skeptical New York audience to the work of America’s modern master.

Dan Meis on the Move… Again

Eavesdroplet, Newsletter, West
Tuesday, September 11, 2012
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Meis’s planned Sports City Stadium in Qatar

Big-time sports architect Dan Meis, who has designed, among other projects, LA’s Staples Center and Seattle’s Safeco Field, is on the move yet again. In the span of just a few years he has shuffled from his own practice to Aedas, then back to his own firm to Populous, to his own firm again, and now he is joining Australian firm Woods Bagot Sport to become its global director. Exciting opportunties? Commitment issues? “I’m not crazy about having been with a couple of different firms in a short time period,” admitted Meis. But he sees it differently: “For me it feels like I’ve been in the same practice all along. It just feels like I’ve been associated with a lot of firms.”

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PRODUCT> Roman and Williams for Waterworks

Newsletter, Product
Tuesday, September 11, 2012
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Though the ten-year-old design firm Roman and Williams has worked on high profile projects for NYC’s Ace Hotel and the Breslin restaurant, The Standard Hotel and its “iconic” Boom Boom Room, the new food hall for Facebook’s campus, celebrity homes for Ben Stiller and Gwyneth Paltrow as well as their own two homes/design laboratories, founders Robin Standefer and Stephen Alesch have never launched a product line of their own. For their very first collection they collaborated with Waterworks on R.W. Atlas, a series of industrial yet elegant bathroom fixtures inspired by traditional American craftsmanship.

A marble slab tops the Metal Two Leg Single Washstand (below), an Unlacquered Brass stunner that speaks to the collection’s overall masculine/feminine power play. “R.W. Atlas is part of our ongoing interest in embracing the idea of American utility, but imbuing that with a sense of glamour and sophistication,” explains Standefer, principal of Roman and Williams. Like the rest of the collection, its primary components are made from brass and are available in a variety of finishes, including Burnished Nickel and Carbon. Read More

Prentice Preservationists Doubt Northwestern Survey Results

Midwest, Newsletter
Monday, September 10, 2012
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(TheeErin/Flickr)

(TheeErin/Flickr)

Even after several Pritzker-winning architects signed onto the preservation campaign last week, the Commission on Chicago Landmarks again omitted from its meeting agenda the embattled Old Prentice Women’s Hospital. Then, noting the recent flurry of media coverage, commission Chariman Rafael Leon announced at the top of Thursday’s meeting that the commission would address the issue before the end of its fall season.

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Race Street Rising

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, August 29, 2012
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Race Street Tower. (Courtesy Peter Gluck)

Retail will wrap around the proposed tower’s base at Second and Race Street (Courtesy Peter Gluck and Partners).

Last week Philadelphia’s new zoning code went into effect, but projects nurtured under the old code may still be rising. Just yesterday, architect Peter Gluck presented a tower proposal to the Old City Civic Association for a 16-story building adjacent to the Ben Franklin Bridge. Because the zoning permits were filed last month the building is subject to old code.

Gluck’s presentation of 205 Race Street soured when new renderings revealed that an early proposal by SHoP Architects, initially approved at a 100-foot height, had morphed into a 197-foot tower that sets back from Race Street, PlanPhilly reported. The group voted 11 to 1 to oppose the project.

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Hope on Hudson? Durst has Idea for Beleaguered Pier 40

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 28, 2012
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With the beleaguered Hudson River Park languishing, Douglas Durst is weighing in on dilemmas at Pier 40 (at right).

With Hudson River Park languishing, Douglas Durst is weighing in on dilemmas at Pier 40 (at left). (Stoelker/AN)

As AN recently reported, Hudson River Park is still in the weeds, both literally and figuratively. Now Douglas Durst is pointing to a possible solution to the beleaguered Pier 40. The pier was once one of the few money making sources for the self-sustaining park, but it is now deteriorating and costing $2 million a year to maintain. Durst, chair of the park’s friends group, told The New York Post that the park should consider stacking up the existing parking to free up valuable space and in turn rent the pier as lofts to the area’s expanding tech sector. The notion could avoid a lengthy State Legislature battle and an uphill ULURP processes for the proposed hotel/residential complex.

PRODUCT> Rock Chair, by Fredrik Färg for Design House Stockholm

Newsletter, Product
Tuesday, August 28, 2012
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This streamlined Scandinavian stunner is not your granddaddy’s rocking chair.

We have lounges, chaises, day beds and a range of other seating options designed for nesting, curling up, reclining and relaxing, yet the rocking chair, that front porch symbol of lazy day languor, has been mostly forgotten by modern design. In fact, Design House Stockholm, the self-described publishing house for contemporary Scandinavian design, noted that “at some time in the 20th century the design development of the rocking chair stopped” altogether. With that in mind, Stockholm-based furniture designer Fredrik Färg created Rock Chair, a rocking chair that “continues the traditional rocking chair’s comforting function but in a modern design.”

More after the jump.

Shortlist For Sixth Street Viaduct Competition

Newsletter, West
Friday, August 24, 2012
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Sixth Street Viaduct as it looks now(John Humble)

The Los Angeles Bureau of Engineering has announced three finalists in an international design competition for the $401 million Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project. The three finalists—AECOM, HNTB, and Parsons Brinckerhoff—will be asked to design an “iconic” cable-stayed bridge across the LA River between the LA Arts District and Boyle Heights. The project is complicated by overhead high voltage lines, a change of alignment that will remove a kink in the roadway, and numerous right of way and jurisdiction issues near the river.

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Petition Scrambles to Save Frank Lloyd Wright House From Demolition

Newsletter, West
Thursday, August 23, 2012
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The David Wright House. (Courtesy Curbed LA)

The David Wright House. (Courtesy Curbed LA)

Just a couple months ago, a house by Frank Lloyd Wright’s son Lloyd—the Moore House—was destroyed in Rancho Palos Verdes, California. AN called its loss the “archi-crime of the year,” but now developers in Phoenix, Arizona could one-up the razing with the demolition of an original Frank Lloyd Wright designed for another of his sons, David. The threatened David Wright House is a spiral-planned textile block masterpiece that predates the Guggenheim (the most famous Wright spiral), and an effort is underway to save the property.

More after the jump.

Cincinnati Close to First New Masterplan in 32 Years

Midwest, Newsletter
Thursday, August 23, 2012
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Downtown Cincinnati. (Firesign/Flickr)

Downtown Cincinnati. (Firesign/Flickr)

Cincinnati, a city on the move, released a draft of its first master plan since 1980 in anticipation of approval by the planning commission August 30. The 222-page draft identifies five “initiative areas,” dubbed Compete, Connect, Live, Sustain, and Collaborate. Each contain tasks for growth over approximately ten years, according to the plan, although the document will receive annual budget reviews and will be officially updated every five years.

Continue reading after the jump.

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