Slideshow> Frank Lloyd Wright Archive Moving to New York

East, National
Tuesday, September 4, 2012
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Unity Temple, Oak Park, IL. 1904.

Unity Temple, Oak Park, IL. 1904. (Courtesy The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives/Avery/MoMA)

This morning AN reported that a massive collection of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural drawings, photographs, models, and more are heading to a new home at New York’s Museum of Modern Art and Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, opening up the archive to academic and scholarly research. For your enjoyment, below is a sampling of the treasures encompassed in the collection and a video about the news.

View a slideshow and video after the jump.

Giveaway! Enter to Win a Seat at the Non-Linear Lab on Digital Fabrication

National
Thursday, August 30, 2012
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Studio Mode | modeLab is excited to announce a promotional offer for the upcoming NON-LINEAR LAB: Growth Systems and Digital Fabrication with Skylar Tibbits. With generous support from The Architect’s Newspaper and Fabrikator, we are giving away a Complimentary Seat to this intensive design workshop. The Lab is scheduled for September 8th/9th and will be a weekend full of programming, parametric design, and digital fabrication. Come design and make some wild prototypes with us!

Promotional Details: “Like” us and enter to win a free seat in the Lab. Winner announced Friday, August 31st at 11:59PM EST.

Lab Details: NON-LINEAR LAB is two-day workshop on Growth Systems, Parametric Detailing, and Digital Fabrication. This Lab is the next installment in our coLAB series and is the result of collaborative research undertaken by Skylar Tibbits [SJET + Previous coLAB Instructor] and Ronnie Parsons + Gil Akos [Studio Mode/modeLab]. In a fast-paced and hands-on learning environment, we will cover Fundamental Concepts of Programming and Parametric Design as well as an introduction to Laser Cutting Constraints and Best Practices. Emphasis will be placed on iterative prototyping, allowing for a thorough investigation of a series of Growth, Component, and Detailing Scripts using Python and Grasshopper while working directly with our CNC equipment.

People In Glass Houses Should Have Fresh Flowers

East, National
Monday, August 27, 2012
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Philip Johnson and David Whitney. (Courtesy Glass House)

Philip Johnson and David Whitney. (Courtesy Glass House)

Director Henry Urbach just announced a program that will reintroduce fresh flowers into Philip Johnson’s iconic Glass House in New Canaan, CT, where they’ve been missing seen since Johnson and his partner, David Whitney, passed away in 2005. The arrangements will be created by local designer Dana Worlock, using Whitney’s original plant selection and archival photographs of the home’s interior as inspiration.

Meanwhile, AN is participating in this week’s Glass House Conversations about themes in this year’s Venice Biennale, especially the relationship between critical compliance as espoused by David Chipperfield and Spontaneous Intervention and as featured in the U.S. Pavilion. Share your thoughts through September 2nd.

The Glass House
199 Elm Street, New Canaan, CT 06840
Open Thursday-Monday, 9:30a.m-5:30 p.m.
Tickets start at $30.

Billings Index Still In The Red, But The Decline “Moderated”

National
Wednesday, August 22, 2012
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BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT'S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

The AIA’s monthly Architecture Billings Index (ABI) for July came in with a disappointing 48.7 (any score below 50 indicates a decline in billings for design activity). The news was not all bad though. The ABI was up significantly from last month’s score of 45.9. “Even though architecture firm billings nationally were down again in July, the downturn moderated substantially,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker. “As long as overall economic conditions continue to show improvement, modest declines should shift over to growth in design activity over the coming months.”

Regional and Sector breakdowns after the jump.

Open Source Mobile App Aims To Make Multi-Modal Transit Trips Easy

National
Thursday, August 16, 2012
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You might have heard that the next version of Apple’s iPhone software, iOS 6, is scrapping transit directions when it revamps its mapping program. That’s a big deal for city dwellers in a constant rush to grab the closest subway or the fastest bus and caused quite an uproar earlier this summer when news hit the internet. While Google’s standard app is no longer default, a plethora of software developers have jumped at the opportunity to design custom transit apps. Open Plans, a non-profit software developer in New York, is one of them, and they’re in the final hours of a Kickstarter campaign to fund their transit app.

As of publishing, their open-source OpenTripPlanner Mobile project is still about 20 percent short of its goal, but closing in pretty quickly. The software promises features that the current Google maps app doesn’t allow, like planning for multi-modal trips involving transit, walking, and bikes. New Yorkers can check out an example of Open Plans’ bike-share software Cibi.me, which will help plan Citi Bike trips once the city finally works out all the bugs.

Check out a coverage map after the jump.

Filed Under: 

Rail Picking Up Steam in the East and Midwest.  (Bruce Fingerhood/Flickr) According to the New York Times, Amtrak is gaining riders in the northeast corridor thanks in part to arduous airport security procedures and frequent airline delays. Amtrak also beats airline shuttles in on-time arrivals and proximity to major business centers. In Chicago, the Chicago Transit Authority is counting 16 months of ridership increases for both rail and bus lines. The rail system has seen 51 consecutive months of ridership growth, including a 6.2 percent jump over the last six months. Last year the CTA carried 523 million riders. [Photo: Bruce Fingerhood/Flickr]

 

EVENT> Collaboration: A Conference on The Art and Science of Facades, July 26-27 in SF

National
Tuesday, July 24, 2012
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Snohetta's "Barcode" office building proposal for Oslo. (Courtesy Snohetta)

Snøhetta's "Barcode" office building proposal for Oslo. (Courtesy Snøhetta)

Collaboration: The Art and Science of Facades

Symposium: Thursday, July 26, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
UCSF Mission Bay Conference Center, San Francisco

Workshops: Friday, July 27, 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
California College of the Arts, San Francisco

This week in San Francisco architects and engineers at the forefront of facade design and fabrication will gather to present their latest work and research. Sponsored by The Architect’s Newspaper and Enclos, the first-day line-up for Collaboration: The Art and Science of Facades includes Craig Dykers of Snohetta as the keynote speaker along with presentation by leaders at SOM,  Thornton Thomasetti, Firestone Building Products, IwamotoScott, Future Cities Lab, Gensler, Kreysler & Associates, Gehry Technologies, Buro Happold and more. On the second day, participants receive hands-on practical instruction through workshops with industry leaders.

Those attending both days will receive 16 AIA Continuing Education credits.
One day left to register! For registration click here.

Can’t make it out West this week? Check out the next call for papers: AN‘s Facades + Innovation Conference, October 10-12, Chicago. Download PDF.

Spreading the Placemaking, 80 Projects Funded by National Endowment for the Arts

National, Newsletter
Monday, July 23, 2012
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A yarnbombed statue, Bombshells Flea. (Courtesy of ArtWorks)

A yarn-bombed statue, Bombshells Flea. (Courtesy ArtWorks)

The National Endowments for the Arts (NEA) announced the recipients for this year’s round of Our Town grants—a $5 million investment in creative placemaking all over the United States. Combining grants from 2011, the program has invested over $10 million in projects in all 50 states and Washington D.C.

This year, 80 applicants were chosen from a pool of 317 entries, which were all assigned to one of three panels: Arts Engagement-projects mainly focused on artistic production, Cultural Planning and Design-projects to build local support systems and spaces necessary for creative placemaking, and Non-metro and Tribal Communities-projects based in small communities not adjacent to metropolitan areas.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architectural Billings Index Continues Slump With Third Month in the Red

National
Wednesday, July 18, 2012
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BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT'S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT'S NEWSPAPER)

The Architectural Billings Index (ABI) for June remained in negative territory for the third month in a row. Last month AIA chief economist Kermit Baker expressed concern that the summertime doldrums might mirror a 2011 trend when the ABI lulled after an initially healthy first quarter. Now it looks as though the index is doing just that. “While not all firms are experiencing negative conditions, a large share is still coping with a sluggish and erratic marketplace,” Baker said in a statement. All of the regions of the country and all industry sectors remained in negative territory with the overall index barely budging from May’s 45.8, with June registering at 45.9 (any score below 50 reflects a decrease).

Continue reading after the jump.

Frank Gehry Goes Contextual in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward

National, Newsletter
Friday, July 13, 2012
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(Chad Chenier Photography / Make It Right.)

(Chad Chenier Photography / Make It Right.)

Make It Right, Brad Pitt’s development of contemporary, LEED Platinum homes in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward—an area devastated by Hurricane Katrina and still far from recovered—has a new addition: Frank Gehry. Gehry’s new duplex on the site was completed this week. The surprisingly simple design (especially considering some of the expressive homes in the development) features a waterproof solar canopy, a roof terrace and six covered porches. Still one could argue that Gehry’s stilt-raised design, with its fiber cement siding (that looks like local clapboard siding), metal roofs and focus on outdoor space, is one of the most contextual of the bunch.

Tex-Fab Competition Proposals Harness “Research Through Fabrication”

National
Thursday, July 12, 2012
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"Latent Methods" explores the possibilities of shingles. (Courtesy of Tex-Fab)

"Latent Methods" explores the possibilities of shingles. (Courtesy of Tex-Fab)

While a winner has not yet been selected, Tex-Fab’s new APPLIED: Research Through Fabrication competition has already produced interesting results as four semi-finalists emerge. The competition solicited proposals that best displayed “research through computational fabrication.” The four proposals selected in the first round of adjudication address acoustics, structure, construction, material, and surface effects, each using on digital modeling and fabrication techniques. The proposals, described in more detail below, will be shown at ACADIA 2012 this October at the Synthetic Digital Ecologies conference, hosted at the California College of the Arts.

See the proposals after the jump.

James Turrell Captures a Slice of the Vast Texas Sky with Twilight Epiphany Pavilion

National, Newsletter
Tuesday, July 10, 2012
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(Courtesy Rice University)

(Courtesy Rice University)

For many, work by American artist James Turrell is instantly recognizable. Using light and basic geometric forms as the material of his compositions, Turrell subtly alters space and perception for visitors, creating weight and depth through visual experience that evokes meditation and contemplation.

Turrell’s work is at its height when gazing skyward. Multiple iterations of his Skyspace series have appeared around the world framing a dramatic slice of the heavens in his pristine geometry. The work is, essentially, a skylight: an opening above a room or pavilion for viewing the sky above, but to reduce the work to its function would disregard the transformative power of a simple yet moving experience. In each installation, a confined aperture begins to decontextualize the sky, featuring the color and texture of what is seen as an element of the art.

Continue reading after the jump.

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