American Academy in Rome Announces Rome Prize Winners

National
Monday, April 22, 2013
.

rome_prize_01

The American Academy in Rome has announced the winners of the 117th annual Rome Prize, a national competition awarded to approximately thirty individuals who show outstanding work in the arts and humanities. The prize includes a fellowship and stipend, a study or studio, and an invitation to Rome for six months to two years to work within the Academy and with its students to further explore artistic, professional, or scholarly pursuits while learning from the knowledge of peers. This year, 44 individuals comprised nine peer juries that completed the application selection process.

View the winners in architecture, design, and more after the jump.

The Shortlist> AN’s Editors Pick Five Competitions of the Week

National
Thursday, April 18, 2013
.
SOCIALIGHT Competition Photo

SOCIALIGHT Competition Photo.

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test?  Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

SOCIALIGHT. The Concept Lumière Urbaine invites architects, landscape architects, and urban planners to re-imagine the future role of lighting in urban neighborhoods.  The foundation encourages participants to think beyond the practical use of lighting (security, traffic, and signaling) and consider the way that light can affect the emotions and experiences of the residents of a city.

Registration Deadline: September 12, 2013
Submission Deadline: September 13, 2013

Continue reading after the jump.

Product> Clutter-Free Options In The Hidden Kitchen

National, Product
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
.
B2-kitchen-kitchen tool cabinet by Bulthaup

B2-kitchen-kitchen tool cabinet by Bulthaup.

As interior footprints shrink, compact organization grows increasingly important—particularly in the kitchen. Below is a compilation of some of the smartest solutions to keep the heart of the home clutter-free.

B2-Kitchen-Kitchen Tool Cabinet
Bulthaup

German manufacturer Bulthaup’s B2 kitchen workshop (above) is the perfect disguise for the home cook. The kitchen implement cabinet is outfitted with multiple compartments to store accouterments from pots and pans to pantry items. Adjustable shelves, formatted containers, and storage systems all fit uniformly behind the folding doors. It works in a loft, studio, or office environment.

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: 

AIA Announces 2013 Small Project Award Recipients

National
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
.
Tahoe City Transit Center.

Tahoe City Transit Center. (Courtesy AIA)

The American Institute of Architects has announced the winners of the 2013 Small Project Awards, a program dedicated to promoting small-project designs. Since 2003 the AIA Small Projects Award Program has emphasized the work and high standards of small-project architects, bringing the public’s attention to the significant designs of these small-projects and the diligent work that goes into them. This year’s ten winners are grouped into four categories: projects completed on a budget under $150,000, projects with a budget under $1.5 million, projects under 5,000 square feet, and theoretical design under 5,000 square feet.

View all the winners after the jump.

The Shortlist> Editors’ Picks For This Week’s Top Competitions

National
Thursday, April 11, 2013
.
(Courtesy Salt Lake City Interotta)

(Courtesy Salt Lake City Interotta)

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test?  Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

SALT LAKE CITY INTEROTTA. In an effort to organize city planning, Salt Lake City, Utah came up with the “Mormon Town Grid,” a planning system that evenly and neatly divided pieces of land into squares of the same size. The grid certainly made for a more orderly city, but it also presented a problem. Each 660-f00t square holds 10 acres of land. The blocks are too big and too deep to be walkable, and so driveways and internal streets have been incorporated into the blocks to ease navigation. The competition asks architects, urban designers, and landscape architects to design his/her own 660×660 ft square. Entrants are allowed to interrupt the square any which way they’d like but must remain within the context of the block.

Submission Deadline: May 27, 2013

More after the jump.

Filed Under: 

Obit> Paolo Soleri, 1919-2013

National, Newsletter
Tuesday, April 9, 2013
.
Arcosanti, left, and Paolo Soleri, right. (Doctress Neutopia / Flickr; Courtesy Cosanti Foundation)

Arcosanti, left, and Paolo Soleri, right. (Doctress Neutopia / Flickr; Courtesy Cosanti Foundation)

The visionary architect and artist Paolo Soleri has died. He was best known as the mastermind behind Arcosanti, the ongoing experimental community outside of Phoenix, Arizona. Arcosanti, which has been under construction for more than 40 years, embodies Soleri’s idea of an architecture merged with the environment. More than 7,000 architecture students have worked on Arcosanti, and more than 50,000 people visit the site every year.

Though Soleri has been viewed as an almost mystical outlier in architecture, many of the design principles of Arcosanti mirror contemporary thinking in architecture and planning, including walkability, high density, diversity of uses, urban agriculture, and use of embodied energy. In addition to Arcosanti, Soleri designed buildings in Italy, New Mexico, and several sites across Arizona. According to the Cosanti Foundation, Soleri will be buried at Arcosanti following a private service. A public service will be held later this year.

More of Soleri’s work after the jump.

Architects Celebrate the Life of the Stubbornly Audacious John M. Johansen

National
Monday, April 8, 2013
.
Frank Gehry's tribute to John Johansen. (William Menking / AN)

Frank Gehry’s remembrance of John Johansen. (William Menking / AN)

The Century Club in New York recently hosted a memorial celebration of the life of the late architect John M. Johansen organized by his daughter, Deborah Johansen Harris, and son, architect Christen Johansen. Christen, who collaborated with his father on later renovations and additions to various projects, read a touching tribute to Johansen that recalled his series of fast British sports cars and his ability to do “a handstand from a seated position in a lawn chair, or holding himself horizontally from a lamppost when the opportunity arose.” He remembered that John delighted guests to the New Canaan house “by setting his martini down on the window sill and, mid-conversation, vaulting out the window to the lawn below, reappearing moments later through the front door.”

Continue reading after the jump.

New PBS Series To Showcase Ten Buildings That Changed America

National
Thursday, March 28, 2013
.
Seagram Building, New York City, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1958.

Seagram Building, New York City, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1958. (Courtesy Wikimedia)

These days it seems increasingly rare that we take a moment out of our busy schedules to pause and appreciate our surroundings: downtown skyscrapers, grand civic buildings, or the mundane background buildings along our streets. To many, those soaring steel towers are old news, but have you ever stopped to picture a Manhattan without skyscrapers, or a courthouse in Washington, DC that didn’t resemble a Greek or Roman temple, or how about an America without shopping malls? (Unimaginable. Right?)

Dan Protress, writer and producer of the new PBS television series 10 Buildings that Changed America, certainly has. The series, hosted by Emmy-award winning producer Geoffrey Baer, proves that architecture is the cultural back-bone of any society.  The show was created to celebrate and explore ten of the most influential American buildings—and the architect’s that designed them—that dramatically altered the architectural landscape of this country.

Continue reading after the jump.

That’s So 2007: Architecture Billings Index Continues to Show Healthy Increase

National
Wednesday, March 20, 2013
.
BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

Over the past few months the Architecture Billings Index has shown the strongest growth in the demand for design services since 2007 and once again reports an incrementally strengthened score of 54.9 for February, a slight increase from a 54.2 in January (and a 51.2 in December). All four regions scored above 50, an indicator of positive growth. The Northeast performed the best at 56.7, the West and the Midwest tied at 54.7, and the South finished with a 52.7.

Continue reading after the jump.

Michael Speaks Headed North to Syracuse University as New Architecture Dean

Dean's List, National
Tuesday, March 19, 2013
.
Micheal Speaks (courtesy UK College of Design)

Micheal Speaks (courtesy UK College of Design)

Michael Speaks, Dean of the University of Kentucky College of Design, has just been appointed Dean of Architecture at Syracuse University. Mark Robbins left that post to direct the International Center of Photography in New York. Speaks, who has been at UK since 2008, cited a number of initiatives as his legacy in Kentucky, including many that engaged directly with urban and rural issues in the Commonwealth. “I arrived here at an inauspicious time, a very economically challenging one, ” he told AN. “One of our goals was to make sure that as many studios engaged with real world problems as possible.”
Read More

Filament Mind LED Light Installation Shares Library Searches

National, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 19, 2013
.
(David Agnello Photography, www.davidagnello.com / COURTESY E/B OFFICE)

(David Agnello Photography / Courtesy E/B OFFICE)

Before there was the Kindle and the Sony Reader, there were paperback novels, newspapers, magazines, made of tangible materials, like paper and ink. One could ride the subway and sneak a glimpse into the mind of his fellow passengers without ever exchanging a word; the title printed on the cover of the book you were reading might reveal volumes about your interests and curiosities. With the invasion of e-books and e-readers, there is just no way to tell what people are reading these days. Designers Brian W. Bush and Yong Ju Lee of E/B Office New York changed that with their Filament Mind installation that debuted in late January at the grand opening of the Teton County Library in Jackson, Wyoming.

Continue reading after the jump.

State Department Announces Five Firms Will Lead Overseas Renovation Project

International, Midwest, National
Tuesday, March 19, 2013
.
An aerial view of the U.S. Embassy in London by Kieren Timberlake. (Courtesy Kieren Timberlake)

An aerial view of the U.S. Embassy in London by Kieren Timberlake. (Courtesy Kieren Timberlake)

The State Department’s overseas embassies are getting a facelift. Under the “Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Worldwide Major Rehabilitation/Renovation Architecture/Engineering Design Services solicitation,” a team of designers will overhaul overseas facilities.

Five design teams to undertake the project.

Page 17 of 36« First...10...1516171819...30...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License