Lisbon 2010> Portugal Talks Housing at 2nd Triennale

International
Friday, October 15, 2010
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The Brazilian section featured the city of Recife. (Fred Jordão)

Under the banner Let’s Talk About Houses, the second Lisbon Architecture Triennale opened last night in three different venues around the Portuguese capital. A beautifully renovated electric generating plant featured the results of two competitions: one for the low-income immigrant Portuguese community Cova da Moura, and a second for a house in Luanda, Angola. Meanwhile, a second exhibit on artists working in the realm of architecture is being staged at the contemporary Museo do Chiado (I’ll have more on these two shows in a subsequent post). The most ambitious of the three exhibitions, however, is on view at the Museu Coleção Berardo along the city’s architecturally fascinating waterfront in a district called Belem. Read More

Stars Aligned at Serpentine

International
Thursday, October 14, 2010
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Zumthor (Photo: Gary Ebner)

Increasingly, the architects chosen each year to design the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London hail from a pool of the usual suspects. This past summer, it was Jean Nouvel. SANAA, and Frank Gehry ran up the mast in 2009 and 2008 respectively. The 2011 pavilion, we hear, will be by Swiss mystic architect, Peter Zumthor.

There’s certainly abiding fascination in a series of heavyweights forced to design a lightweight structure on the double-quick (about six months) but the young and restless might actually have more to explore and certainly more to gain than the big names. Then again, more than most, Zumthor has maintained his mystique as an architect. Lightweight he is not: For the 2002 Venice architecture biennale, he submitted a six ton concrete model of his Cologne museum that was too hefty to be contained in the vast Arsenale.

Lisbon's Next Up on the Triennale Trail

International
Wednesday, October 13, 2010
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Talking about houses at the Lisbon Architecture Triennale.

There are so many architecture exhibitions today that call themselves “biennales” and “triennales” that the words have little meaning anymore. In most cases, rather than use the vernacular local word for an every two- or three-year exhibition (say, biannual) they use the Italian word, hoping I guess that the special magic of Venice will rub off on their event. Thus I am in Lisbon, Portugal today for the Architecture Triennale that the organizers are calling “Let’s Talk About Houses.” Read More

Irish Eyes Are Designing

International
Tuesday, October 12, 2010
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Erosion Table by Joseph Walsh (photo: Andrew Bradley)

While it’s doubtful anyone would think of Ireland as a design powerhouse, a new show at the American Irish Historical Society on New York’s Upper East Side suggests the Emerald Isle deserves a second look. Curated by Brian Kennedy, the show includes furniture, ceramics, accessories, jewelery, a wall installation, as well as some models and sketches, and is an engaging crash course in Ireland’s emerging design scene. While there’s no one overriding style, an interest in organic shapes and natural materials is common in much of the work. Read More

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Croatian Fiasco? No way!

International
Friday, October 8, 2010
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Croatia's floating pavilion suffered structural damage on the way to this year's Venice biennale. (Courtesy Katarina Olujić)

“The biggest fiasco…in the history of Croatian architecture?” Well, not really, but there seem to be some architects in Croatia who are angry that their floating pavilion built for the current Venice biennale was destroyed before it reached its intended mooring at the Giardini. Read More

Switzerland In Fall

International
Thursday, October 7, 2010
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USM's Haller system in brown.

In late September, the Swiss furniture company USM unveiled three fall colors for their iconic Haller shelving and storage system. First selected in the 1970s, the reissued orange, brown, and beige colors offer warmer options for the system, which is probably most often seen in black or white. A sunny yellow option was unveiled last year. An installation of the new colors on view at USM’s showroom at 28-30 Greene Street in New York. Read More

Scouting the Magic Mountain of Yugoslav Socialism

International
Friday, October 1, 2010
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Petrova Gora (Photos by Ena Schulz and School of Missing Studies)

Petrova Gora (Photos by Ena Schulz and School of Missing Studies)

The School of Missing Studies and Slought Foundation have recently returned from a “photo safari” to Petrova Gora in Croatia, one of many languishing memorials from the socialist era of the former Yugoslavia. Conceived in 1981 by Vojin Bakić, a Croatian sculptor who won many state-funded commissions, working with the architect Branislav Šerbetić, the project was designed as a 12-story-tall social center, set on the site of a Partisan field hospital used during World War II. Finally completed in 1989 as a monument to Yugoslavia’s resistance fighters, the memorial was used as intended for only a brief period before the Balkan crisis erupted. The wars that ensued scattered refugees around the region, and practically erased the political cause this structure was meant to embody. Read More

Gehry Supports Israeli Settlement Boycott

International
Tuesday, September 21, 2010
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(Photo: Courtesy Inhabitat)

According to the group Jewish Voice for Peace, Frank Gehry has signed a letter supporting an Israeli settlement boycott. Gehry is among an international group of artists and performers who have signed a letter supporting a group of Israeli actors and playwrights who have refused to play at the new theatre in Ariel, a large Jewish settlement in the occupied territories. Gehry, who previously withdrew from the commission to design the Museum of Tolerance in Jerusalem, joins pianist and conductor Daniel Barenboim, composer Stephen Sondheim, actors Julianne Moore and Cynthia Nixon, film director Mira Nair, playwright Tony Kushner and many others. Gehry’s office confirmed his support of the boycott.

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Venice 2010> Has the Biennale Outlived its Usefulness?

International
Thursday, September 2, 2010
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The Cherry Blossom Pavilion, in the Italian pavilion, one of the increasingly rare examples of architecture at the biennale. (Bill Menking)

The 2010 Venice architecture biennale closed on Saturday—at least for media representatives, as journalists were required for the first time to turn in their press passes and enter as public citizens (tickets, $25). I hated giving up that pass as it allowed me access to the exhibitions both at the Arsenale and in the giardini, home of the national pavilions. Though Venice is hardly a major military installation there are canals in the area that are off-limits to civilians; a water taxi driver informed my group that only a special permit would get us into the canal so I produced my press pass and he said “va bene” and he drove us up the canal. The power of the press! Read More

Venice 2010> Storming the Arsenale & Rem in da Haas

International
Friday, August 27, 2010
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Rem Koolhaas, winner of this year's Golden Lion, at the Arsenale. (Bill Menking)

Nothing much to report from yesterday, as it was a day of formal openings when very little was in fact open to the press or public. It was mostly a day of introductory speeches by biennale directors and city and government officials. Frank Gehry presented some models, made a few brief remarks, and then everyone headed for the hallway, where we had our first free prosecco and great little appetizers. Journalists and media types stood around asking about where the best parties were to be had in the coming days (more on this later). Read More

The U.S. Pavilion Sells Out in Shanghai

International
Tuesday, August 24, 2010
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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during her visit to the U.S. Pavilion earlier this year. The "Wall of Honor"—with its corporate sponsors—can be seen in the background. (Courtesy U.S. State Dept.)

Now that the pavilions have begun arriving at the Grand Canal, that other great architectural exhibition of the summer has faded into memory. No, we’re not talking about the one in Pasadena. Or at P.S.1. Not the Serpentine. This would be the Shanghai World Expo, which did have some pretty great pavilions upon its opening in June. Not among them, sadly, was the U.S. Pavilion, in large part because we refused to front the money for the structure, and so it got farmed out. Now, Marketplace has a report from the pavilion that pretty perfectly encapsulates the problems and perseverance of the little pavilion that couldn’t, even how it has won over many Chinese, what with their love with propaganda and irony.

Venice 2010> The Black Shirts are Coming!

International
Tuesday, August 24, 2010
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An installation made from frisbees. (CLICK TO ZOOM)

No, not the Fascists—that was 2008, when the Northern League held its national rally at the entrance gates of the biennale giardini. I mean the architects! They have arrived in droves, and it’s easy to spot them walking along the Grand Canal absorbing the searing heat and humidity of August in Venice. The second day of reading press releases, walking the giardini, and visiting collateral exhibitions reaffirms my sense that there is more art in the 2010 biennale than architecture. This is, of course, not necessarily a bad thing, and many of these installations do consider architectural questions. But it makes one wonder why national pavilions make the decisions they do about the architectural conditions in their country. Read More

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