Pictorial> Gehry Down Under

International
Monday, January 10, 2011
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Dr. Chau Chak Wing Building. West elevation. (Gehry Partners, LLP)

Dr. Chau Chak Wing Building. West elevation. (Gehry Partners, LLP)

You better run, you’d better take cover! Frank Gehry‘s is heading down to Australia with a half twisted-brick, half glass-shard business school for the University of Technology, Sydney. The $150 million project draws its inspiration from a tree house, or as Frank puts it, “a trunk and core of activity and… branches for people to connect and do their private work.”

View all the Gehry goodness after the jump.

MoMA′s Young Architects Program Heading to Rome

International
Thursday, December 23, 2010
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Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

The prestigious Young Architects Program put on by the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA P.S.1 in New York has announced that it’s teaming up with Rome’s National Museum of 21st Century Arts, or MAXXI, to host a second outdoor installation at the new Zaha Hadid museum.
Read more: Officials hope for a local feel as finalists are announced.

Pictorial> Architects Propose Rolling Hotel in Norway

International
Wednesday, December 22, 2010
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Architects propose a series of buildings rolling on tracks (Courtesy Jagnefalt Milton)

Architects propose a series of buildings rolling on tracks (Courtesy Jagnefalt Milton)

Swedish architects Jagnefalt Milton have proposed architectural locomotion for Åndalsnes, a town in Norway. A series of buildings would be built atop existing rail tracks in the city and could house various uses ranging from a rolling hotel to a rolling concert hall to a rolling public bath.

Get rolling on to the photos after the jump!

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Fumihiko Maki Named AIA Gold Medal Winner

International
Tuesday, December 21, 2010
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Fumihiko Maki Wins AIA's 2011 Gold Medal

Fumihiko Maki Wins AIA's 2011 Gold Medal (Photo Imogene Tudor)

 

Fumihiko Maki was named AIA’s 2011 Gold Medal winner last Thursday, making him the 67th in that illustrious line. Maki began his career in the 1960s as a part of the group of Japanese architects known as the Metabolists who championed large biomorphic structures that could expand and change as needed. His more recent designs, such as the new Media Lab at MIT, present a decidedly fixed composition, though MIT retains the suggestion of interchangeable volumes. The concept did find its way into Maki’s thoroughly adaptable interior, as was noted during a walk-through by AN last spring.

More on Maki after the jump.

Snohetta Heads South of the Border

International
Wednesday, December 15, 2010
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image courtesy of Snøhetta

The Oslo- and New York-based firm Snøhetta has been chosen to design the new Museum of Environmental Sciences at the University of Guadalajara. They were selected from a short list including Shigeru Ban, DS+R, Smiljan Radic, and Mauricio Rocha.
Read More

The Coolest Video We’ve Ever Seen

International
Tuesday, December 14, 2010
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Street artist Blu recently made LA headlines when his commissioned mural for MOCA’s Geffen Contemporary (featuring coffins draped by dollar bills) was subsequently whitewashed by MOCA itself. In a statement, MOCA called the mural, which was across from the LA Veterans’ Affairs Hospital, “inappropriate,” and the move has angered (to say the least) the street art community.

For those of you unfamiliar with Blu, please take a look at this video, called Big Bang Big Boom. There are no special effects, just stop-action animation; a dazzling combination of architecture and art. It’s unclear where he shot this piece, but he obviously needed to find an area with lots of empty, and largely abandoned, walls and lots. We’re blown away, so to speak.

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Pictorial: Le Monolithe by MVRDV

International
Friday, December 10, 2010
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Le Monolithe in Lyon, France (Courtesy MVRDV)

Le Monolithe in Lyon, France (Courtesy MVRDV)

MVRDV just completed “Le Monolithe,” a mixed-use project in Lyon, France featuring social housing, apartments, disabled residences, offices, and retail organized along a central exterior axis of courtyards. The 350,000 square foot structure overlooks the confluence of the Rhône and Saône rivers and represents a collaboration of several architects and landscape architects.

Take a look at the project after the jump.

The Reign of TV in Spain

International
Monday, December 6, 2010
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Detail from "Receiver to Remote control... channeling Spain 2010."(Courtesy Lisbeth Salas)

A recent trip to Barcelona for the World Architecture Festival (WAF) made clear to me just how well the nations of the European Union do at updating their historic centers. American tourists, of course, go to places like Spain to see medieval or Renaissance urbanism not contemporary cities. And that’s a shame because we could learn a great deal about how to build today and add intelligently to our own 19th and 20th century cities.

Read More

Architecture, the Final Frontier for Pirates?

International
Wednesday, December 1, 2010
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(Slightly adjusted) Zaha Hadid Pavilion (Courtesy John Picken / flickr)

(Slightly adjusted) Zaha Hadid Pavilion (Courtesy John Picken / flickr)

 

Aye, those swashbucklin’ pirates are at it again, matey! This time, though, they’re not after gold, DVDs, or designer purses, but the identities of architects. The Guardian‘s Jonathan Glancey relates that Chinese firms posing as British officers of Aedas and Broadway Maylan have been pursuing bids with false information. He points out the dangers that such a development might entail for the profession and wonders if starchitects like Zaha Hadid could be the next victims.

Read More

Biennale Finale

International
Wednesday, November 24, 2010
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This is the last Venice Architecture Biennale post for 2010–I promise! The organization that oversees all the Venetian biennales (art, film, music etc.), la Biennale di Venezia, sent us a press release with the numbers from the just concluded architecture exhibition. It claims that 170,000 people visited the event, a 31% increase over the last architecture exhibit in 2008  (which had 129,323 attendees). It should be pointed out however that the older and more established art biennale had 375,702 attendees in 2009. The exhibition included the participation of 53 Countries and 20 Collateral events sponsored by international institutions and organizations and located in various venues in and around Venice. Read More

Terence Riley to Head 2011 Shenzhen/Hong Kong Biennale

International
Friday, November 19, 2010
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Photo courtesy Miami New Times

Terence Riley has been selected to head the Shenzhen & Hong Kong Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture. After leaving his post as chief curator of architecture and design at MoMA, Riley set out to revamp the Miami Art Museum. Key to his tenure in Miami was a drive to move the museum into a new $100 million building designed by Herzog & de Meuron. But with economic downturn, the project stalled and Riley resigned in October of 2009.

The new appointment makes him the first non-Chinese curator to head the five-year-old event. The program, which will be announced next year, focuses on the unique character of Hong Kong, Shenzhen and on young cities in particular. As Shenzhen’s extraordinary growth has taken it from a fishing village to a major metropolis in only the past 50 years, it’s a natural fit for the event.

“The full program is still being developed, but our idea is to create a paradigm that considers the cyclical growth pattern of urban cities such as Shenzhen, where cities create architecture, architecture creates cities, and how the process continues without end,” Riley said in a statment. “At a time when sustainability is imperative, the idea of describing an open process that takes into account its own renewal and constant evolution is essential.”

Video: Chinese Hotel Climbs Fifteen Stories in Six Days

International
Monday, November 15, 2010
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Chinese hotel built in just six days (DifferentEnergy Video)

Chinese hotel built in just six days (DifferentEnergy Video)

Would you stay in a 15-story structure built in six days?  Through the magic of prefabrication, one new hotel in Changsha, China was built erector-set-style at just such a fantastic pace and recorded through time-lapse photography. The better term might be constructed in six days, however, as the building’s foundation and the factory-made pieces were already finished at the beginning of this architectural ballet, but the feat proves rather amazing nonetheless.

While you might have never heard of Changsha, China, home to the new Ark Hotel, the country’s 19th largest city mirrors the building’s rapid growth.  Changsha tripled in size between the 1940s and 1980s and today contains an estimated population of 6.6 million.

While such a quickly constructed building might seem prone to shoddy construction, the Ark Hotel is reportedly built to withstand a magnitude 9 earthquake, meaning a quake over 1,000 times more powerful than January’s quake in Haiti.  Call us skeptical, but we’d opt to be out of the building when disaster strikes.

Prefabrication, architecture’s “oldest new idea,” can have its green benefits. The Ark Hotel is thermally insulated and boasts only one percent construction waste. [ Via Gizmodo. ]

Watch the construction footage after the jump.

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