Unveiled> BIG Designs a Power Plant That Loves You

International
Tuesday, February 1, 2011
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Waste-to-Energy Plant in Copenhapen (Courtesy BIG)

Waste-to-Energy Plant in Copenhapen (Courtesy BIG)

Where one architect might see an incinerator, Bjarke Ingels, principal at Dutch firm BIG, envisions a ski slope. Ingels has been fond of the mountain typology and he hasn’t been all that subtle about it, giving projects names like Mountain Dwellings and emblazoning Mount Everest on the side.

In his latest competition-winning proposal for Copenhagen, BIG takes the concept one step further, with a mountain you can actually ski down.

And it blows smoke rings, too!

Pictorial> Marc Jacobs Builds a Lantern in Tokyo

International
Tuesday, January 25, 2011
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Marc Jacobs flagship Tokyo store by Stephan Jaklitsch Architects (Liao Yusheng)

Marc Jacobs flagship Tokyo store by Stephan Jaklitsch Architects (Liao Yusheng)

New York firm Stephan Jaklitsch Architects (SJA) has completed the latest jewel box on Tokyo‘s premiere shopping street, the Omotesando-dori in the Aoyama shopping district. The richly textured Marc Jacobs flagship store is comprised of three masses each of glass, stone, and perforated metal, the latter two appearing to float above the sidewalk.

Check out more info and a photo gallery after the jump.

And the Water Came Rushing In

International
Wednesday, January 19, 2011
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Brisbane underwater (Courtesy ABC AU)

Brisbane underwater (Courtesy ABC AU)

The water-logged city of Brisbane, Australia continues its massive clean up effort after January floodwaters devastated the region. ABC Australia, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation that is, has assembled two amazing sets (here and here) of interactive before and after photography showing just how bad the flood event really was. Before and after aerial photography for the entire city is posted online at NearMap.

[ Via Information Aesthetics. ]

A few aerials that caught our attention after the jump.

Filed Under: , ,

Noever Out At MAK

International, West
Wednesday, January 19, 2011
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We’ve learned that after 25 years at it’s helm, Peter Noever has announced plans to step down as head of Vienna’s MAK (Museum of Applied Arts). Here in LA, Noever opened the MAK Center for Art and Architecture at the Schindler House in West Hollywood and also added the Fitzpatrick-Leland House in the Hollywood Hills to the MAK’s stable.

According to The Art Newspaper, the Austrian Green Party had “submitted an inquiry to parliament this fall following allegations that he had mismanaged resources.” This includes problems with the recent Austrian entry at the Venice Bienale. “There has been a media campaign against me,” Noever told The Art Newspaper. According to the paper Noever has since been offered a job working with former Guggenheim director Thomas Krens.

Wait a minute… Two spurned high ego museum directors working together? Now THIS should be interesting.

Helsinki Asks for a Guggenheim

International
Tuesday, January 18, 2011
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Central Railway Station in Helsinki (Photo courtesy Paul Allais/flickr, additions BK/archpaper)

Central Railway Station in Helsinki (Photo courtesy Paul Allais/flickr, additions BK/archpaper)

The Guggenheim could be headed to the land of a thousand lakes. Helsinki’s Mayor Jussi Pajunen announced today that the city is commissioning the venerable museum to conduct a concept and development study to be completed by the end of the year to determine the potential museum’s economic impact and mission.

More after the jump.

Prince Charles Is Slumming It?

International
Thursday, January 13, 2011
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Yesterday AN learned, via ArchNewsNow, that Prince Charles is planning a new town in India that draws its inspiration from the slums and informal settlements of Calcutta and Bangalore. While the Prince has long been a bete noire for modernists, his interest in vernacular, impromptu settlements is in line with modern architects like the members of Team 10 and Bernard Rudofsky.

The Prince is no stranger to town building, having created a simulacrum of a medieval village at Poundbury. In India, the Prince’s Foundation for the Built Environment plans to build 3000 homes–for an estimated 15,000 low income residents–interwoven with schools and small shops.

“We have a great deal to learn about how complex ­systems can self-organize to ­create a harmonious whole,” the Prince said in a statement, according to the Daily Mail. The Prince, widely admired for his work on sustainable agriculture, plans to include green features like rainwater collectors and natural ventilation.

Unveiled> Henning Larsen in Nigeria

International
Thursday, January 13, 2011
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Rendering of the Calabar International Conference Center in Nigeria (Courtesy Henning Larsen)

Rendering of the Calabar International Conference Center in Nigeria (Courtesy Henning Larsen)

Danish architects Henning Larsen have designed a convention center for a major city in Nigeria. Consisting of four volumes resembling sculptural rocks atop a plinth, the Calabar International Conference Center offers flexible space that can accommodate growing conference activity in the city as well as offer the community cultural space for concerts, festivals, and exhibitions. Check out a couple more renderings after the jump.

One Year In: Five Healthful Homes for Haiti

International
Wednesday, January 12, 2011
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Breathe House, First Place (Courtesy Archive)

Breathe House, First Place (Courtesy Archive)

One year ago, a catastrophic earthquake tore through Haiti killing 200,000 people. Today, some progress has been made to return to normality but a Goliath mountain of rubble that was once Port au Prince still must be cleared and housing built for the vast population living in ruins and tents.

Toward that end, ARCHIVE, Architecture for Health in Vulnerable Environments, has announced the winners of a housing competition and will build five houses that promote healthy living in Haiti this year. Winners from around the world paid special attention to limit the transmission of tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, the leading deadly diseases in the country.

See the winners and learn more after the jump.

Pictorial> Gehry Down Under

International
Monday, January 10, 2011
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Dr. Chau Chak Wing Building. West elevation. (Gehry Partners, LLP)

Dr. Chau Chak Wing Building. West elevation. (Gehry Partners, LLP)

You better run, you’d better take cover! Frank Gehry‘s is heading down to Australia with a half twisted-brick, half glass-shard business school for the University of Technology, Sydney. The $150 million project draws its inspiration from a tree house, or as Frank puts it, “a trunk and core of activity and… branches for people to connect and do their private work.”

View all the Gehry goodness after the jump.

MoMA′s Young Architects Program Heading to Rome

International
Thursday, December 23, 2010
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Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

The prestigious Young Architects Program put on by the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA P.S.1 in New York has announced that it’s teaming up with Rome’s National Museum of 21st Century Arts, or MAXXI, to host a second outdoor installation at the new Zaha Hadid museum.
Read more: Officials hope for a local feel as finalists are announced.

Pictorial> Architects Propose Rolling Hotel in Norway

International
Wednesday, December 22, 2010
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Architects propose a series of buildings rolling on tracks (Courtesy Jagnefalt Milton)

Architects propose a series of buildings rolling on tracks (Courtesy Jagnefalt Milton)

Swedish architects Jagnefalt Milton have proposed architectural locomotion for Åndalsnes, a town in Norway. A series of buildings would be built atop existing rail tracks in the city and could house various uses ranging from a rolling hotel to a rolling concert hall to a rolling public bath.

Get rolling on to the photos after the jump!

Filed Under: 

Fumihiko Maki Named AIA Gold Medal Winner

International
Tuesday, December 21, 2010
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Fumihiko Maki Wins AIA's 2011 Gold Medal

Fumihiko Maki Wins AIA's 2011 Gold Medal (Photo Imogene Tudor)

 

Fumihiko Maki was named AIA’s 2011 Gold Medal winner last Thursday, making him the 67th in that illustrious line. Maki began his career in the 1960s as a part of the group of Japanese architects known as the Metabolists who championed large biomorphic structures that could expand and change as needed. His more recent designs, such as the new Media Lab at MIT, present a decidedly fixed composition, though MIT retains the suggestion of interchangeable volumes. The concept did find its way into Maki’s thoroughly adaptable interior, as was noted during a walk-through by AN last spring.

More on Maki after the jump.

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