Pictorial> eVolo 2012 Skyscraper Competition Winners Announced

Dean's List, International
Wednesday, March 7, 2012
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Himalaya Water Tower: Zhi Zheng, Hongchuan Zhao, Dongbai Song

The winners of the eVolo 2012 Skyscraper Competition have been announced; get ready for an afternoon of browsing some pretty spectacular renderings. Entries offer innovative (and sometimes outlandish) solutions in an attempt to address the social, historical, urban, and environmental responsibilities of the 21st century mega-structure.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> Jean Nouvel’s Police Panopticon/Dance Studio

International
Tuesday, March 6, 2012
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(Courtesy Jean Nouvel)

(Courtesy Jean Nouvel)

It is unclear whether the newest Jean Nouvel project in Charleroi, Belgium is the first of the hybrid Police Headquarters/Dance Studio typology, but we would guess that it is. The collaboration between Paris-based Atelier Jean Nouvel and the Belgian firm MDW Architecture was selected in a competition and resulted in a scheme for a 246-foot tower and renovation of 19th century brick barracks.

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DS+R and OLIN To Spin Granite Web In Aberdeen.  DS+R and OLIN To Spin Granite Web In Aberdeen Yesterday voters in Aberdeen, Scotland narrowly approved a plan to transform Union Terrace Gardens in the heart of the city into an ambitious hybrid park and cultural center designed by Diller, Scofidio + Renfro with OLIN, according to The Scotsman. The project is estimated to cost £140 million, though Sir Ian Wood, an oil services tycoon, has pledged £50 million toward the project. Aberdeen is known as the Granite City, and the design creates a new series of granite pathways criss-crossing over the sloping site, dividing it into different programmatic zones, including an amphitheater, exhibition hall, and a number of gardens.

 

Pictorial> Jim Kazanjian’s Victorian Apocalypse

International
Tuesday, February 28, 2012
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Untitled (house), 2006. (Jim Kazanjian)

Untitled (house), 2006. (Jim Kazanjian)

Jim Kazanjian doesn’t make photographs of buildings, he makes photographs into buildings. His assemblages of “found” structures create fantastic worlds that resemble the post-civilization wreckage of 19th century England.  Through the collapse of time and expansion of space, each collage tells an eerie story about making the familiar unfamiliar.

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Urban Movement Design to Transform Hadid’s MAXXI for Young Architects Program in Rome

International
Tuesday, February 28, 2012
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Rendering of Urban Movement Design’s Unire/Unite, winning design of YAP MAXXI 2012. (Courtesy Urban Movement Design)

Rendering of Urban Movement Design’s Unire/Unite, winning design of YAP MAXXI 2012. (Courtesy Urban Movement Design)

Earlier this month, we were first to bring you renderings of HWKN’s planned installation for MoMA’s P.S. 1 Young Architects Program (YAP), but now AN has learned that YAP’s counterpart in Rome has selected Urban Movement Design’s proposal for a series of sinuous benches and archways covered in grass and hanging plants as the winner to fill Zaha Hadid’s MAXXI museum piazza this June.

Continue reading after the jump.

Breaking> Chinese Architect Wang Shu Awarded Pritzker Prize

International
Monday, February 27, 2012
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Wang Shu in front of his New Academy of Art HangZhou, China. (Iwan Baan)

Wang Shu in front of his New Academy of Art Hangzhou, China. (Iwan Baan)

Chinese architect Wang Shu has been named the 2012 Pritzker Architecture Prize laureate, marking the first time a Chinese architect has been honored prize which brings a bronze medal and $100,000 purse. Wang Shu is known for building with traditional Chinese forms and materials, often recycling bricks and tiles to form a patchwork mosaic in his buildings, which demonstrate a distinct modern sensibility. He is professor and head of architecture at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, China and founded Amateur Architecture Studio with Lu Wenyu in 1998 where he has taken an outspoken stance against architecture that he perceives as destroying vast urban and rural landscapes across China.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pratt Student Awarded Gensler Brinkmann Scholarship

Dean's List, East, International
Monday, February 20, 2012
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Tina Uznanski's concept for a flexible library. (Courtesy Gensler)

Tina Uznanski's concept for a flexible library. (Courtesy Gensler)

While most design students are starting the scramble for plum summer internships, Tina Uznanski can rest easy, knowing a desk with her name on it will be waiting at Gensler’s London office. Uzanski, an interior design student at the Pratt Institute, has received Gensler’s annual Brinkmann Scholarship, winning a paid summer internship at the Gensler office of her choice and a cash prize to be put toward her final year of study at Pratt. The award was established in 1999 as a memorial to interior designer and former Gensler partner Donald G. Brinkmann.

Uznanski won the competition with her clever concept for a renovation of her neighborhood library in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, that creates a flexible room through “shifting stacks.” images after the jump

Damien Hirst Dabbles in Homebuilding.  Damien Hirst Dabbles in Homebuilding  Hirst's "Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living" (Sotheby's/PA) Artist Damien Hirst, known for, among many other things, suspending dead animals in formaldehyde, is also considered to be the world’s richest artist (he’s reportedly worth over $300 million). He’s investing some of that money in the development of 500 new “eco-houses” near North Devon, on the southwest tip of Great Britain. The residences, which will feature rooftop turbines, solar panels and sophisticated insulation, are slated to break ground early next year. One of the firms working on the drawings is London firm MRJ Rundell + Associates, whose founder Mike Rundell told a North Devon newspaper of Hirst “He has a horror of building anonymous, lifeless buildings. He wants these houses to be the kind of homes he would want to live in.”

 

Target Tosses Graves, Ending 13 Year Partnership.  Target Tosses Graves, Ending 13 Year Partnership After collaborating on dozens of products from tea kettles to toilet plungers, Minneapolis-based Target is ending its 13 year partnership with architect Michael Graves, according to the Star-Tribune. “Michael Graves was Target’s first and longest-standing design partner to date,” Stacia Andersen, senior vice president of home merchandising, said in a statement. “Together, we created an iconic product collection that expertly blended design with function.” A final Graves collection will debut in March and will be available through 2012. Graves was the first well-known designer to work with the discount retailer, and his products proved so successful that the company has since worked with numerous other product and fashion designers.

 

Corb’s Unité d’Habitation Damaged By Fire.  Corb's Unité d'Habitation Damaged By Fire The Guardian is reporting that one of Le Corbusier’s most famous works, the Unité d’Habitation in Marseille, France, has been damaged in a fire. Three apartments were gutted and many other units were damaged by the fire, which took 12 hours to contain. Five people were being treated for injuries. Originally built as low-income housing between 1947 and 1951, the Unité is now a protected landmark in France and home to approximately 1600 residents in 334 apartments.

 

Video> Koyaanisqatsi Sped Up 1552 Percent

International, Newsletter
Thursday, February 9, 2012
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Viewing Godfrey Reggio’s film Koyaanisqatsi, the first in a trilogy, is a right of passage, especially for architects who hold a profound interest in the relationship between the natural and built world. (If you haven’t seen it yet, stop right here and go see the original first.) Koyaanisqatsi is taken from the Hopi language and, from the film, translates to “the crazy life, life in turmoil, life out of balance, life disintegrating, a state of life that calls for another way of living.” Here, the film has been sped up 1552% by Wyatt Hodgson in honor of the publication of A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indes in 1552. The unforgettable scenes of the beauty and variety of the natural world, destruction of the inner city, the machine-like quality of traffic on Fifth Avenue, the fall of Pruitt-Igoe, and the often-brutal realities of the modern world have been sped up to clock in at around four and a half minutes. Take a look above. [Via Lost at E Minor.]

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What the Dickens! Chuck, 200, Obsessed With Design

International
Tuesday, February 7, 2012
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Set designer Simon Costin prepares his Dickens window display. (Simon Costin)

Set designer Simon Costin prepares his Dickens window display. (Simon Costin)

Charles Dickens would have been 200 today. Among the bicentennial celebrations of the noted Victorian writer, the Museum of London has been hosting an elaborate Dickens and London exhibition including a Dickensian street scene designed and built by set designer Simon Costin for its City Gallery. The “fantastical wintry vision of 19th century London” made entirely of cardboard and lit with hundreds of LED lights includes quite an array of Victorian buildings and winding alleyways. According to Costin, “My intention is to create a fantasy vision of London as it would have been glimpsed by Dickens on his nocturnal wanderings through the city. His essays are extremely evocative and I am using the text as my starting point and things will grow and develop from there. He has said that he felt like a child in a dream, ‘staring at the marvellousness of everything’. It is that marvellousness that I want to recreate.” The window display closes this month, but if you’re in London, the MoL’s Dickens show keeps going through June. (Via Creative Review.)

But it turns out Dickens had his own eye for design as well. Hilary Macaskill recently wrote in the Guardian that the Victorian author had quite the penchant for interior design. She cites a 6,000 word article (you can become amazingly descriptive when paid by the word) he wrote about wallpaper and other decorations, where he remarks on the design of American wallcoverings from his recent visit in 1842 along with his own designs for wallpaper. Even in his home at 48 Doughty Street, Dickens enjoyed crafting the interior spaces down to the shade of pink trim and a set of decanters he picked up for “slight bargains.” Read the entire article here and check out a slideshow of his home here.

Please sir, I want some more.

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