Bjarke Ingels Designs a Park as a Museum, Curated by the People

International, Newsletter
Monday, November 5, 2012
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The Red Square, The Black Square – Superkilen, Copenhagen. (Torbin Eskerod, Courtesy Superfex)

An inventive new park in Copenhagen’s Norrebro district, “Superkilen,” designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), Superflex, and Topotek 1 serves as a sort of cultural collage of artifacts sourced from 60+ nationalities. Superkilen slices its way through the center of the city, soaking up and flaunting its inhabitants’ diverse cultural backgrounds along the way. The kilometer-long wedge of urban space, completed this summer, is divided according to use into three distinct color-coded zones and sports bike paths linking directly to Copenhagen’s cycling highways.

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Shareway 2030: How Höweler + Yoon Wowed Audi

International, Newsletter
Thursday, November 1, 2012
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(Courtesy HYA)

(Courtesy HYA)

Somewhere in the world right now, drivers and passengers are cursing their city’s traffic. The automotive snarls common in today’s metropolis are accepted as a symptom of modernity, but the traffic jam—as well as the battle between wheeled and foot traffic on city streets—is probably as old as the city itself. In fact, our forbearers dealt with it in many of the same ways that we’re attempting to now. To alleviate congestion in Rome, Julius Caesar implemented a version of road space rationing, forbidding carts and chariots to enter the city center before late afternoon. For bustling 15th century Milan, Leonardo da Vinci sketched an idea for road sharing system that separated pedestrian from wheeled traffic.

But the stakes of moving through the city were dramatically changed in the early 20th century with the debut of the car, a shift that provoked well-founded anxiety. “With all their speed forward, they may be a step backward in civilization,” Booth Tarkington wrote of automobiles in The Magnificent Ambersons, his 1918 novel that follows the beginnings of car culture. The multi-layered cost of cars and the infrastructure they require have come under intense scrutiny almost 100 years later, but one automotive company is hoping to be a leader in the conversation about what’s next. 2012 marks the second cycle in Audi’s Urban Future Award, a biannual competition that invites young architecture firms to contemplate what “mobility” could mean for cities in the year 2030.

Continue reading after the jump.

Richard Meier Reinterprets Bauhaus Modernism in New Tel Aviv Luxury Tower

International
Thursday, November 1, 2012
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(Courtesy Richard Meier & Architects Partners)

(Courtesy Richard Meier & Architects Partners)

Architect Richard Meier is stamping downtown Tel Aviv with another luxury landmark, “Meier on Rothschild,” a mix-use residential, commercial and office complex towering 39-stories over Tel Aviv’s White City. Located on Rothschild Boulevard, the tower is Meier’s  modern take on Bauhaus architecture that characterizes the city, where two- and three-story buildings defined by minimalist and functional architecture and marked by smooth white curved exteriors are common.

Continue reading after the jump.

Watch Out For Starchitects While Trick-or-Treating Tonight

International
Wednesday, October 31, 2012
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Zaha Hadid as Elphaba. (Courtesy Building Satire)

Zaha Hadid as Elphaba. (Courtesy Building Satire)

The sun has set on the east coast and trick-or-treaters are beginning to fill the streets, but keep your eyes peeled for starchitects lurking in the shadows. Building Satire has imagined five of our favorite international stars as vampires, witches, mimes, scary clowns, and Frankenstein. Spooky! But what starchitect could pull off a pirate or headless horseman? Share your suggestions in the comments. [Via Curbed.]

More after the jump.

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Architects Propose Carving a Soccer Stadium Into Mountains Near Abu Dhabi

International, Newsletter
Wednesday, October 31, 2012
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The Rock Stadium (Courtesy of MZ Architects)

The Rock Stadium (Courtesy of MZ Architects)

A new sports stadium designed by Lebanon’s MZ Architects, though experimental, differs from the glitz and glam we’ve become accustomed to seeing from Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Instead of showing off with dramatic curves and shiny glass, the proposed “Rock Stadium” would be buried in the Al Ain desert and will work with the natural elements, being concealed by the its rocky landscape.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Colorful Camouflage of a Secret Tea Shop

International
Monday, October 29, 2012
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The Gourmet Tea shop begins to unfold (Djeng Chu)

The Gourmet Tea shop begins to unfold (Djeng Chu)

Bright colors are not typically associated with inconspicuous spaces but when it comes to The Gourmet Tea storefront, the shop manages to bring the two together.Through the use of clever ingenuity and compact design Brazilian architect Alan Chu successfully plants a secret tea shop inside a public shopping center in São Paulo, Brazil.

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2012 Curry Stone Prize Winners Announced

International
Friday, October 26, 2012
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The Liters of Light project inexpensively illuminates dark houses in the Philippines.

The Liters of Light project inexpensively illuminates dark houses in the Philippines.

The annual Curry Stone Prize, which honors design for social change, has shaken up its awards program this year. Previously laurels went to a Grand Prize winner, leaving several teams as runners-up. But in recognition of Curry Stone’s fifth cycle, this year five winners will equally share the prize, including a cash award of $25,000 each. Announced this week, the 2012 winners are:  Center for Urban Pedagogy, aka CUP (Brooklyn, New York); Liter Of Light (Manila, Philippines); MASS Design (Boston, MA); Riwaq (Ramallah, Palestine); and Jeanne van Heeswijk (Rotterdam, Netherlands).

Once again the Curry Stone Foundation has teamed up with Harvard’s Graduate School of Design to create a larger educational event around the awards ceremony, which takes place at the GSD on November 15. The day following the winning teams will deliver presentations on their work and participate in panel discussions that are free and open to the public. Read More

Golden Carbuncle: Grimshaw’s Cutty Sark Named Ugliest Building in UK

Eavesdroplet, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, October 24, 2012
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(Jim Stephenson)

(Jim Stephenson)

The famous clipper ship Cutty Sark was recently rehabilitated by Grimshaw Architects, who also built an exhibition hall around the vessel. The project, which opened in April, has just received the dubious distinction of winning Building Design’s 2012 Carbuncle (a.k.a. “ugliest building”) Cup award. Parked in Greenwich, England and categorized as a World Heritage site, the ship now floats on a blue glass base intended to suggest water. But the resulting effect is more bateau-en-gelée, prompting BD executive editor Ellis Woodman to write that the project had “the best of intentions and yet has tragically succeeded in defiling the very thing it set out to save.”

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Massive Project by Norman Foster could Transform Toronto

International
Tuesday, October 23, 2012
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Proposed redevelopment of the Metro Toronto Convention Center. (Courtesy Oxford Properties)

Proposed redevelopment of the Metro Toronto Convention Center. (Courtesy Oxford Properties)

Starchitects are descending on Toronto. First it was Frank Gehry with his plan for three 80-story skyscrapers on top of an art museum, and now Norman Foster with a massive plan to redevelop the Metro Toronto Convention Centre area adjacent to the CN Tower and Rogers Centre Stadium. Developed by Oxford Properties Group and dubbed Oxford Place, the plan calls for upgrades to the current convention center and four new towers for housing, office space, a hotel, and a casino surrounding a five-and-a-half acre park spanning a railroad.

Continue reading after the jump.

2012 World Architecture Festival Winners Boldly Reinvent the Urban Landscape

International
Monday, October 22, 2012
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Garden by the Bay. Courtesy Wilkinson Eyre (Photo Credit: Craig Sheppard)

Garden by the Bay. (Craig Sheppard/Courtesy Wilkinson Eyre)

Several large-scale, eco-friendly projects at the intersection of landscape, architecture, and urbanism were honored at this year’s World Architecture Festival (WAF) in Singapore. Building of the Year was awarded to London-based Wilkinson Eyre’s Gardens by the Bay (above), designed in collaboration with landscape architects Grant Associates in 2003 for a competition to develop a reclaimed 250-acre site adjacent to a marina in downtown Singapore. Among the other top honorees were AECOM’s Heart of Doha Masterplan, winning Future Project of the Year, and Atelier Dreiseitl’s Kallang River Bishan Park, which took Landscape Project of the Year.

Read about the winners after the jump.

Unveiled> OMA Designs an Academic Village Under a Single Roof in Suburban Paris

International
Monday, October 22, 2012
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Entrance to École Centrale from Metro Station (Courtesy OMA)

Entrance to École Centrale from Metro Station (Courtesy OMA)

OMA has won the design competition for the new École Centrale Engineering school in Saclay, France, a suburb of Paris. The final design calls for an enormous block composed of smaller buildings creating an open plan grid. According to OMA, the concept behind the design is a “lab city” where multiple events can take place while all being simultaneously observed.

More after the jump.

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Doha Tower Named World’s Best by Council on Tall Buildings

International, Midwest
Saturday, October 20, 2012
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Doha Tower façade (Jean Nouvel)

Doha Tower façade (Jean Nouvel)

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat held its 11th annual awards symposium Thursday, bestowing architect Helmut Jahn and structural engineers Charles Thornton and Richard Tomasetti with lifetime achievement recognition and awarding Doha Tower the title of 2012’s Best Tall Building.

Ateliers Jean Novel’s cylindrical landmark for the burgeoning Qatar capital is the first tall building to use a diagonal grid of reinforced concrete columns in a cross shape. This innovation leaves open the central core, creating a stunning space at the tip of the tower that makes perhaps the best use of the building’s intricately detailed facade.

Continue reading after the jump.

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