Wiel Arets wins design for Europaalee Site

International
Tuesday, September 3, 2013
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Courtesy Wiels Arets Architects

Civic space and facade of building (Courtesy Wiel Arets Architects)

Wiels Arets Architects recently won a competition to design the “Europaallee site D” building in Zurich. The building is a pivotal component in the emerging mixed use district of “Europaallee,” a major infrastructure project which will incorporate 6,000 workplaces, 1,800 study spaces, 400 flats, one hotel, shops, restaurants, and other leisure activities. The winning entry accommodates retail activities and circulation spaces on the lower floors, while the upper volumes contain flexible office space. The building has been designed with scope for a residential component in the future.

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Unveiled> OMA Master Plan Wins Bogotá’s International Design Competition

City Terrain, International
Wednesday, August 28, 2013
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(Courtesy OMA)

(Courtesy OMA)

OMA has been selected to design the Bogotá Centro Administrativo Nacional (CAN) new civic center, situated at the heart of the city’s main axis, Calle 26. Steered by partner-in-charge Shohei Shigematsu, the 680-acre mixed-use design occupies a footprint as large as Washington, D.C.’s National Mall and will operate as the city’s government headquarters with intermixed residential, educational, retail, and cultural developments, all which encourage continuous activity within separate districts. The design intends to integrate civic and public life while connecting to local destinations.

Continue reading after the jump.

Norman Foster Resigns from Pushkin Museum Expansion Before Russian Ultimatum

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 27, 2013
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Pushkin Museum Expansion Project Rendering (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Pushkin Museum Expansion Project Rendering (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Moscow’s Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts expansion project, one of Russia’s most prominent and contentious building schemes, has spiraled into disarray. Since Foster + Partners’ winning plans to expand and modernize the 101-year-old institution were originally approved in 2009, the development has been confronted with a series of delays including disputes between officials and preservationists. Now, to cap it off, the firm has officially resigned from the project.

Continue reading after the jump.

Video> Richard Rogers Builds a Prefabricated Multi-Level House In 24 Hours

International
Tuesday, August 27, 2013
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Homeshell House in the Royal Academy Courtyard. (Courtesy Miguel Santa Clara via Royal Academy)

Homeshell House in the Royal Academy Courtyard. (Courtesy Miguel Santa Clara via Royal Academy)

With modular homes on the rise, it seems to be time to bid farewell to long months and even years of construction and salute fast-paced, pre-fabricated systems arriving across the globe. At the Royal Academy in London as part of the Inside Out exhibition, Richard Rogers’ firm Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) has introduced an innovative, environmentally efficient, three-and-a-half story home called the Homeshell. It is meant to inspire discussion about affordable mass housing. The flat-packed home on display contains individually installed windows and boasts a low environmental impact. Colorful facade materials enliven the closed timber frame system.

More after the jump.

2013 Buckminster Fuller Challenge Semi-Finalists Propose Designs for Humanity

International
Friday, August 23, 2013
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Fly's Eye Dome by Buckminster Fuller

Fly’s Eye Dome by Buckminster Fuller (Courtesy NYCDOT / Flickr)

Just as soon as they were announced, deliberation has begun on the nineteen semi-finalists in the 2013 Buckminster Fuller Challenge. In the spirit of architect Buckminster Fuller’s call for revolutionary scientific design, this international design competition summons participants to innovate sustainable, long-term solutions for “humanity’s most pressing problems.”  This year, the jury has chosen projects that vary in subject and method, re-envisioning current global systems or addressing specific gaps within them. Read More

Photo of the Day> Snap, Rattle, and Roll

International
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
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An earthquake interrupts a photo shoot. (Adrian Wilson)

An earthquake interrupts a photo shoot. (Adrian Wilson)

Architectural photographer, Adrian Wilson, shared this photo with AN that he snapped during a photo shoot in Mexico City today. The routine work day, this time at Casa Palacio for Jeffrey Hutchison & Associates, was abruptly interrupted by a magnitude 6.1 earthquake epicentered some 250 miles outside the Mexican capital. It was once instance, the usually-steady Wilson said, when he “couldn’t avoid camera shake…” According to news reports there was no major damage or injuries reported from the tremor.

Pisa Going Plumb? Leaning Tower—Very Slowly—Straightening Up Its Act

International, Newsletter
Friday, August 16, 2013
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Leaning Tower of Pisa. (Eric Meyer / Flickr)

Leaning Tower of Pisa. (Eric Meyer / Flickr)

The Torre di Pisa is straightening up its act, according to scientists who monitor the famous tower’s tilt. There’s no need to worry, though, the Tower of Pisa won’t be standing completely vertical any time soon. The Huffington Post reported this week that the tower has shifted about an inch (2.5 cm) back toward being upright since 2001, when the structure was reopened to the public.

This gravity-defying maneuver was brought about by a restoration to the tower’s foundation that began in 1992 when the building’s foundation were secured, moving the entire structure a whopping 15 feet. Structural interventions included temporarily installing steel cables as an emergency measure followed by excavating stones beneath the tower and replacing them with steel and concrete. The overall effect, according to HuffPo, was to sink the tower slightly into the ground and thereby make it more vertical. Scientists said these restorative measures will make the Leaning Tower safe for two- to three-centuries.

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Not Merely Child’s Play: LEGO Architecture Kit Allows Creative Freedom to Adult Builders

International
Thursday, August 15, 2013
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Courtesy Michael Monello / Flickr

On August 1st, LEGO released a new kit in its series of building block design sets marketed specifically to architecture enthusiasts. LEGO’s Architecture Studio Kit, from its Architecture Series of adult-catered building sets, consists of 1,200 all white and translucent plastic bricks but no instructions. The free-for-all kit is endorsed by MAD Architects of Beijing and comes with a guidebook of architecture building exercises. Michael Bleby of Business Review Weekly writes that this set “is the first in the range to focus on creativity and architectural principles, rather than a specific architectural icon.” A modernist’s dream that costs significantly less than others within the series, LEGO may possibly have caught onto a new niche market. Especially when reviews thus far of the landmark-specific Architecture Series have been mixed from architects and enthusiasts alike.

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Jean Nouvel–Designed Louvre Abu Dhabi Begins Construction

International
Thursday, August 15, 2013
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(Courtesy Atelier Jean Nouvel)

(Courtesy Atelier Jean Nouvel)

French Pritzker Prize–winning architect Jean Nouvel‘s design for Louvre Abu Dhabi has begun construction after a series of delays. The building’s most prominent feature is a 180-meter-diameter  dome. The design of the dome is culturally relevant as well as utilitarian. The shape is prominent in traditional Arabian architecture. As the Louvre Abu Dhabi website describes, it is “an emblematic feature…evoking the mosque, the mausoleum, and the madrasa.” The dome’s expanse also protects the building and its visitors from the sun. Carefully formulated geometric apertures in the all-white structure allow diffused and dappled daylight inside the museum, while mitigating heat gain. Nouvel designed the dappled pattern to emulate interlaced palm fronds, which are traditionally used in Arabic countries for thatch roofs.

Continue reading after the jump.

Shigeru Ban Reinvents Earthquake-Damaged Christchurch With Temporary Cardboard Cathedral

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 13, 2013
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Cardboard Cathedral, Exterior (Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects)

Cardboard Cathedral, Exterior (Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects)

As a result of a devastating earthquake in February 2011, New Zealand’s Christchurch Cathedral was left critically damaged. After an inconclusive debate about whether to completely tear down, restore, or remodel the original Neo-Gothic cathedral, the people of Christchurch were struck with what might be divine inspiration in the form of a temporary home, the world’s only cathedral constructed extensively of cardboard.  Tourism New Zealand announced the inauguration of Cardboard Cathedral, a replica of the original church constructed of cardboard tubes, timber joints, steel, and concrete.

Continue reading after the jump.

Herzog & de Meuron Chosen To Redevelop Historic Melbourne Train Station

International, Newsletter
Monday, August 12, 2013
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Flinders St. Station (Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron)

Flinders St. Station (Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron)

A team led by Herzog & de Meuron has been unanimously selected for the redevelopment of Melbourne’s historic Flinders Street Station after beating out a star-studded shortlist that that included Zaha Hadid and Grimshaw. The team will be awarded a $1 million prize. The winning design aims to transform the iconic 1909 train station into a 21st century civic center and transportation hub, preserving the most beloved features of the landmark building while integrating it into a contemporary urban context. The proposal also incorporates cultural, retail, and civic programs within an adjacent 500,000 square foot site along the Yarra River, including a public art gallery, plaza, amphitheater, marketplace, and permanent space for arts and cultural festivals.

Continue reading after the jump.

Zoë Ryan to Curate 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial.  Zoë Ryan to Curate 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial Zoë Ryan, curator of architecture and design at the Art Institute of Chicago, has been selected to curate the second Istanbul Design Biennial, taking place from October 18 through December 14, 2014. Read AN’s report from the previous Istanbul Design Biennial here. Ryan has been working to expand the Art Institute’s architecture and design holdings and teaches at the School of the Art Institute and at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Previously, she worked at New York’s Van Alen Institute and the Museum of Modern Art. (Photo: Courtesy Art Institute of Chicago)

 

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