Turkey Passes Legislation to Protect Istanbul’s Historic Skyline Silhouette from Rapid Urbanization

International
Thursday, July 11, 2013
.
Urbanization is changing Istanbul's skyline. (Harvey Barrison / Flickr)

Urbanization is changing Istanbul’s skyline. (Harvey Barrison / Flickr)

For 1475 years, the colossal dome and four minarets of the Hagia Sofia have remained the focus of Istanbul’s historic silhouette. That is, until three hulking towers known as the OnaltiDokuz Residences interrupted the scene last summer, sparking another battle over development in the Turkish capital. In late May, the Hurriyet Daily News reported that the city’s 4th Administrative Court ordered the demolition of the skyscrapers, claiming that their construction was illegal because it “negatively affected the world heritage site that the Turkish government was obliged to protect.” To guard against future infractions, this Wednesday the Turkish Parliament passed legislation calling for additional safeguards nationwide to protect historic areas from rapid urbanization.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> AHMM Designs Google’s New London HQ

International
Tuesday, July 9, 2013
.
(Courtesy AHMM)

(Courtesy AHMM)

London-based Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM) has applied for planning permission to build a 67-acre headquarters for Google in London’s King’s Cross, a swiftly evolving district. The firm’s designs incorporate a steel-framed structure with cross-laminated timber panels complemented by bold primary colored exposed steel elements. The plan integrates a rooftop garden along with shops, cafes, and restaurants on the ground level. Construction is set to begin early next year. Read More

Filed Under: , ,

Spend the Summer in Portugal Building a Giant Model for the Lisbon Triennale

International, Newsletter
Wednesday, July 3, 2013
.
Workshop Futuro Perfeito (Courtesy Susana Gaude)

Workshop Futuro Perfeito (Courtesy Susana Gaude)

The Venice Biennale may be the most visible and glamorous architecture exhibition in the world, but it is not the only one on the design calendar. In fact, these exhibitions have been proliferating around the globe in the past ten years and several have not made it past their inaugural year. One of the best of the newer architecture exhibits is the Lisbon Triennale, which is about to host its third exhibition opening September 12, 2013.

Read More

Sou Fujimoto Awarded the Marcus Prize by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Sou Fujimoto. (David Vintiner)

Sou Fujimoto. (David Vintiner)

This had been a big year for 42-year-old Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto. He has been the focus of a special design charrette at Rome’s Maxxi Museum and then awarded the prestigious commission for the Serpentine Pavilion in London. Now he been awarded the 2013 Marcus Prize. The prize awarded by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Architecture and supported but the Marcus Corporation Foundation is meant to recognize an architect “on a trajectory to greatness.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Archaeological Survey in Angkor Reveals Intricacies of Pre-Industrial Urbanism

International
Tuesday, July 2, 2013
.
Pre Rup temple at Angkor, Cambodia (Matt Werner / Flickr)

Pre Rup temple at Angkor, Cambodia. (Matt Werner / Flickr)

The US National Academy of Sciences has published the results of a survey performed in April 2012 of the forests of Cambodia, which uncovered a monumental, intricate landscape of low-density urban sprawl connected to ancient ruins of Angkor Wat that dates back to more than 700 years, invalidating archaeologists’ current understandings of pre-industrial urbanism.

Continue reading after the jump.

Whimsical Green Promenade Aims to Revive London’s Disconnected Vauxhall Neighborhood

(COURTESY OF ERECT ARCHITECTURE)

(COURTESY OF ERECT ARCHITECTURE)

From the mid-17th to the mid-19th century, crowds of Londoners sought entertainment at the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, located on the south bank of the River Thames. The acres of greenery that made up the garden were once the site of numerous whimsical attractions, including tight-rope walkers, concerts, fireworks, and narrow winding walkways perfect for amorous adventures. Today the neighborhood of Vauxhall, located in the heart of Nine Elms, is mostly known for the railway arches that slice across the neighborhood, disconnecting it from the riverside and labeling it as the “missing link” between the New US Embassy Quarter and London’s South Bank.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> A Grimshaw-Designed Garden Vision for Wimbledon

City Terrain, International
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
.
(Courtesy Grimshaw)

(Courtesy Grimshaw)

The All England Club has unveiled its Grimshaw-designed Wimbledon Master Plan, which establishes a vision for the future of the site and a structure to direct the ongoing development and improvement of the Club. The Master Plan draws on existing assets and reflects the history of The Championships while resolving certain challenges that the site presents. Three new grass courts will be repositioned to ease overcrowding, No. 1 Court will be reworked and a fresh landscape scheme will enhance and define public areas.

Continue reading after the jump.

Q+A> Francisco Mangado on Spain’s Foreboding Changes For Architects

International
Tuesday, June 25, 2013
.
Municipal Auditorium of Teulada (left); Francisco Mangado (right)

Municipal Auditorium of Teulada (left) by Francisco Mangado (right)

At the AIA’s National Convention in Denver, held from June 19–22, AN’s Emily Hooper sat down with Spanish architect Francisco Mangado, who was in attendance to receive an honorary fellowship. Mangado discussed foreboding amendments to Spain’s law of professional services that would allow engineers, or anyone deemed “competent” in construction, to design and erect buildings across the nation. The law was introduced at a council meeting of Government Ministers in April of 2013, and a final pass-or-fail decision will be reached by the end of this year. Read More

Reiser + Umemoto Break Ground on Taipei Pop Music Center

International
Friday, June 21, 2013
.
(Courtesy Reiser + Umemoto)

(Courtesy Reiser + Umemoto)

Internationally recognized Reiser + Umemoto (RUR Architecture) has announced the groundbreaking of the 675,000-square-foot Taipei Pop Music Center (TPMC) at its new site in Taiwan, which took place on Wednesday. The urban complex confronts the confines of conventional performance spaces, consisting of various multifunctional spaces within a cohesive, vibrant venue that represents evolving pop culture.

Continue reading after the jump.

Six Design Teams Shortlisted for New U.S. Embassy in Beirut

International
Thursday, June 20, 2013
.
(Beirut photo courtesy Wikipedia)

(Beirut photo courtesy Wikipedia)

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO) has shortlisted six firms to design the new U.S. Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon. The new Embassy will be located in Awkar, about 7 miles north of the city center, in the vicinity of the existing Embassy. The new compound will consist of a chancery, support offices, a parking structure, Marine residence, Representational and staff housing, and a community center. Thirty-nine firms replied to the public announcement regarding the task of designing the center.

Continue reading after the jump.

SANAA Shares Renderings of Bazalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem

International
Tuesday, June 18, 2013
.
Rendering of the new campus (Courtesy SANAA)

Rendering of the new campus (Courtesy SANAA)

The Architecture firm Sejima & Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA), in partnership with Israel’s Nir-Kutz Architects, recently unveiled a proposal for a new 400,000 square-foot building for Jerusalem’s Bazalel Academy of Arts and Design. The design of the new building aims to promote collaboration between the school’s eight different—and currently separate—departments by housing them under one roof for the first time. There will be space for classrooms, studios, offices, two auditoriums, public galleries, and cafes.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pritzker to Denise Scott Brown: No Prize For You, Not Yet At Least (Updated)

International
Tuesday, June 18, 2013
.

Denise-Scott-Brown-Las-Vegas-1972-www.glamcult.com_

Robert Venturi won the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1991. His wife and professional collaborator Denise Scott Brown was not recognized, sparking a controversy that has raged ever since. Following a recent round of petitions and editorials calling for a retroactive prize–or some form of recognition—the current Pritzker jury chair, Lord Peter Palumbo, sent a letter on the matter to two current students at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Arielle Assouline-Lichten and Caroline James, organizers of the most prominent of the recent petitions.

Palumbo made it clear that no retroactive prize was possible: “Insofar as you have in mind a retroactive award of the prize to Ms. Scott Brown, the present jury cannot do so. Pritzker juries, over time, are made up of different individuals, each of whom does his or her best to find the most highly qualified candidate.” Palumbo left open the possibility of recognition for Scott Brown. “Let us assure you, however, that Ms. Scott Brown remains eligible for the Pritzker Award. That award is given on the basis of an architect’s total body of built work.” Palumbo further acknowledged the context of the controversy: “We should like to thank you for calling directly to our attention a more general problem, namely that assuring women and fair and equal place in the profession.”

Real Lord Palumbo’s Letter in Full.

Page 20 of 56« First...10...1819202122...304050...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License