Chelsea Market Expansion Approved at City Planning

East
Wednesday, September 5, 2012
.
New renderings of the Chelsea Market edition shows a set back of massing from the High Line. (Courtesy Jamestown)

New renderings of the Chelsea Market edition shows a set back of massing from the High Line. (Courtesy Jamestown)

In a unanimous vote today, the New York City Planning Commission approved Jamsestown Properties’ plans for expansion at Chelsea Market with few modifications. The building was rezoned to be included in the Special West Chelsea District, thereby allowing developers to increase density after a significant contribution is made to the High Line. Much to the quite literal relief of High Line visitors, this likely means bathrooms will finally find their way to the southern section of the park.

Continue reading after the jump.

Picnics, Monuments & Memorials: Two Centuries on Two Blocks

East
Tuesday, September 4, 2012
.
The September 11th Memorial at night.

The September 11th Memorial at night. (Tom Stoelker / AN)

Literally in the shadow of One World Trade is a memorial for September 11 that has been overrun by tourists since the days after the disaster. Its quiet dignity has been maintained, outlasting the dozens of hawkers who sold Twin Tower replicas just a few feet away. The memorial bears but one name, “Mary Wife of James Miles,” who died on September 11, 1796.

Today’s New York Observer weighed in on the New York Post‘s claim that tourists are turning the September 11 Memorial into a glorified playground. “When the construction barriers finally come down, the lines will be gone, people will come and go as they please. They will pray and they will play, and that is how it should be,” wrote the Observer’s Matt Chaban. As the debate continues as to what constitutes appropriate behavior at the memorial, one need only walk one block east to take in two century’s worth of history on how New Yorkers memorialize.

Continue reading after the jump.

Slideshow> Frank Lloyd Wright Archive Moving to New York

East, National
Tuesday, September 4, 2012
.
Unity Temple, Oak Park, IL. 1904.

Unity Temple, Oak Park, IL. 1904. (Courtesy The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives/Avery/MoMA)

This morning AN reported that a massive collection of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural drawings, photographs, models, and more are heading to a new home at New York’s Museum of Modern Art and Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, opening up the archive to academic and scholarly research. For your enjoyment, below is a sampling of the treasures encompassed in the collection and a video about the news.

View a slideshow and video after the jump.

Inwood Hill’s Land Artist Young Jee Passes Away.  The land art of Young Lee. Young Jee, the land artist who carved his work into earth of Inwood Hill has died, DNAinfo reports. Far from the galleries flanking the High Line, Jee’s quiet compositions served as an anecdote to high concept, in keeping with the park which is the largest natural tract of land in Manhattan. (Photo: Tom Stoelker / AN)

 

Goldberger Discusses Themes for Scully Prize Speech

East
Thursday, August 30, 2012
.
Paul Goldberger wins the 14th Vincent Scully Prize.

Paul Goldberger wins the 14th Vincent Scully Prize.

It’s been quite a year for architecture critic Paul Goldberger, and almost as dizzying for his readers as for him. But the The New Yorker‘s loss has turned out to be Vanity Fair‘s gain, giving the glossy additional gravitas. Now the National Building Museum has added Goldberger to its illustrious roster of Vincent Scully Prize winners. “I don’t know that I’ll ever be on another list that includes Prince Charles and Jane Jacobs,” Goldberger said in a telephone interview.

Goldberger discusses his speech after the jump.

EVENT> Architecture & the Media: Trade Press, An Evolving Role

East
Thursday, August 30, 2012
.

Architecture & the Media #3: Trade Press, an Evolving Role
Thursday, September 6
6:00-8:00pm
Center for Architecture
536 LaGuardia Place

Traditionally, publication in a trade magazine was an effective way to reach peers and demonstrate credibility to clients. Are trade publications becoming hybrids of journalism and networking sites, two-way streets where users are more engaged with editors?

Join us at the Center for Architecture on September 6 for a panel discussion on design reporting, the third installment of Architecture & the Media, a four-part series exploring today’s media landscape co-produced by the Center for Architecture, AIANY’s Oculus and Marketing & PR Committees, and The Architect’s Newspaper.

For Trade Press: An Evolving role, moderator and AN executive editor Alan Brake will be joined by editors Katie Weeks of Eco-Structure magazine, Linda Barr of Real Estate Weekly, Stacy Shoemaker Rauen of Hospitality Design magazine, and Diana Moser of Multi-Housing News.

Tickets: $10 for members and students, $20 for non-members.
PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

Race Street Rising

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, August 29, 2012
.
Race Street Tower. (Courtesy Peter Gluck)

Retail will wrap around the proposed tower’s base at Second and Race Street (Courtesy Peter Gluck and Partners).

Last week Philadelphia’s new zoning code went into effect, but projects nurtured under the old code may still be rising. Just yesterday, architect Peter Gluck presented a tower proposal to the Old City Civic Association for a 16-story building adjacent to the Ben Franklin Bridge. Because the zoning permits were filed last month the building is subject to old code.

Gluck’s presentation of 205 Race Street soured when new renderings revealed that an early proposal by SHoP Architects, initially approved at a 100-foot height, had morphed into a 197-foot tower that sets back from Race Street, PlanPhilly reported. The group voted 11 to 1 to oppose the project.

Continue reading after the jump.

Hope on Hudson? Durst has Idea for Beleaguered Pier 40

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 28, 2012
.
With the beleaguered Hudson River Park languishing, Douglas Durst is weighing in on dilemmas at Pier 40 (at right).

With Hudson River Park languishing, Douglas Durst is weighing in on dilemmas at Pier 40 (at left). (Stoelker/AN)

As AN recently reported, Hudson River Park is still in the weeds, both literally and figuratively. Now Douglas Durst is pointing to a possible solution to the beleaguered Pier 40. The pier was once one of the few money making sources for the self-sustaining park, but it is now deteriorating and costing $2 million a year to maintain. Durst, chair of the park’s friends group, told The New York Post that the park should consider stacking up the existing parking to free up valuable space and in turn rent the pier as lofts to the area’s expanding tech sector. The notion could avoid a lengthy State Legislature battle and an uphill ULURP processes for the proposed hotel/residential complex.

People In Glass Houses Should Have Fresh Flowers

East, National
Monday, August 27, 2012
.
Philip Johnson and David Whitney. (Courtesy Glass House)

Philip Johnson and David Whitney. (Courtesy Glass House)

Director Henry Urbach just announced a program that will reintroduce fresh flowers into Philip Johnson’s iconic Glass House in New Canaan, CT, where they’ve been missing seen since Johnson and his partner, David Whitney, passed away in 2005. The arrangements will be created by local designer Dana Worlock, using Whitney’s original plant selection and archival photographs of the home’s interior as inspiration.

Meanwhile, AN is participating in this week’s Glass House Conversations about themes in this year’s Venice Biennale, especially the relationship between critical compliance as espoused by David Chipperfield and Spontaneous Intervention and as featured in the U.S. Pavilion. Share your thoughts through September 2nd.

The Glass House
199 Elm Street, New Canaan, CT 06840
Open Thursday-Monday, 9:30a.m-5:30 p.m.
Tickets start at $30.

Tacha Sculpture Saved!.  Tacha Sculpture Saved. (Courtesy Athena Tacha) In an about face, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie reversed a decision to demolish Athena Tacha’s Green Acres, a site specific installation at the State’s Department of Environmental Protection. Tacha is largely credited with bringing the land art movement into the social context of architecture. The 1985 sculpture’s staying power remains contingent upon private funding to restore the piece. With Art Pride New Jersey, Preservation New Jersey, and The Cultural Landscape Foundation all rallying to the cause, Green Acres looks like it will remain the place to be.

 

Video> Manhattan Drawn in a New York Minute

East
Friday, August 24, 2012
.

A good portion of our editorial staff just boarded an airplane headed for the Venice Biennial, so AN headquarters is pretty quiet this afternoon. For your Friday afternoon enjoyment, check out this time-lapse video of the Manhattan skyline viewed from the Empire State Building being drawn with amazing detail by illustrator Patrick Vale. [h/t E Minor]

Filed Under: , ,

Tactical Urbanism Death Match Ends Only With Scratches

East
Friday, August 24, 2012
.
"Is Small Big Enough? Planning & Intervening in Public Space." (Courtesy Flux Factory)

“Is Small Big Enough? Planning & Intervening in Public Space.” (Courtesy Flux Factory)

What happens when you gather four tactical urbanists in one room for a “Death Match”-style debate asking, “Is Small Big Enough?” You get a choir. The panel at the Flux Factory’s discussion last night was equipped with “smackdown cards” to challenge the views of their opponents, but they all agreed more often than they disagreed, that the small scale actions at the root of tactical urbanism—and this years US Pavilion at the Venice Biennale, Spontaneous Interventions—are just fine. What emerged from the packed house was a highly polished discussion, where minor differences were exposed, ground down, and made smooth.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 82 of 157« First...102030...8081828384...90100110...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License