Rem’s Next New York Commission is in the Bag

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, July 31, 2012
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OMA to design Coach display in New York and Tokyo.

OMA to design Coach display in New York and Tokyo.

High-design fashion label Coach has been pursuing big-name architects, recently announcing its corporate headquarters will be the anchor tenant for a new Kohn Pederson Fox tower at Hudson Yards with James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s High Line running underneath. Next up, Rem Koolhaas’ OMA will design the brand’s new flagship shop-in-shop at Macy’s in Herald Square.

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Could Computer Problems Delay New York Bike Share Again?

East
Tuesday, July 31, 2012
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(Branden Klayko / AN)

(Branden Klayko / AN)

If everything had gone according to plan, New York’s highly anticipated bike-sharing system called Citi Bike would be in full swing. Unfortunately, earlier this month the city announced that a computer software glitch had pushed the opening back until August. While we can handle waiting one more month, rumors that the planned 10,000 bright blue Citi Bikes might not hit the street until next year had us alarmed.

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AN Video> Revel CEO DeSanctis Talks Change in Atlantic City

East
Tuesday, July 31, 2012
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The new Revel casino in Atlantic City may prove to be an influential model, merging entertainment with gambling and convention center facilities. Bellied up against the Atlantic City boardwalk, Revel’s designers—Arquitectonica with BLT Architects—paid special attention to how the facility interacts with its surroundings. Revel features acres of interior spaces designed by more than 65 design firms showcasing a dizzying array of finishes, from polished chrome columns to a 100-foot gold-flecked mobile.

AN recently visited the oceanside casino and spoke with Revel CEO Kevin DeSanctis about what makes the building different from other casinos and why Atlantic City needs the change.

Safe Harbor?  Safe Harbor? If you need to turn around an aircraft carrier, it helps to have an experienced captain on board. Maybe that’s the strategy behind RMJM’s rumored choice of Danish shipping exec Jesper Bo Hansen to lead its New York office. Hansen has spent the last two decades not in architecture but in the shipping biz, first at cargo giant Maersk and most recently at Torm. Maybe he’ll instate some ship to shore protocols at RMJM, whose financial management woes have played out publicly in recent years. As Bjarke Ingels might say, held og lykke—good luck, Jesper!

 

Lutron Lights up the Empire State Building

East
Monday, July 30, 2012
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When construction was completed on the Empire State Building (ESB) in 1931 it cost $25.6 million—that’s just $9.20 per square foot. You can’t even build a single floor for that nowadays, much less a 1,454-foot tall skyscraper (adjusting for inflation, the ESB would cost $352 million today). Though the building hosts events and tour groups, most of us only see it from the outside and don’t realize that the reason it’s known as the World’s Most Famous Office Building is because tenants occupy the vast majority of its 102 floors. And like any other office building, lighting consumes the majority of its electrical costs—a whopping 39 percent.

In order to meet their stringent return-on-investment requirements, Anthony Malkin, President of Malkin Holdings, which owns the ESB, and Jones Lang LaSalle, an energy and sustainability consultancy, commissioned Lutron to supply pre-built tenant spaces throughout the building with sustainable lighting control solutions as part of the Clinton Climate Initiative Building Retrofit program aimed at improving efficiency and financial performance. The building-wide retrofit is projected to provide a total lighting energy savings of up to 65 percent and a reduced installed payback period of just 2.75 years. Overall, the Lutron system will reduce energy use by 38 percent and energy bills by $4.4 million per year. Moreover, the upgrade will prevent an estimated 105,000 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions over the next 15 years.

Continue reading after the jump.

Design Trust Brings the Urban Farm to New York’s Planning Table

East
Friday, July 27, 2012
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Phoenix Community Garden in Brownsville, Brooklyn (Rob Stephenson/Courtesy Design Trust for Public Space)

Phoenix Community Garden in Brownsville, Brooklyn. (Rob Stephenson/Courtesy Design Trust for Public Space)

New York City is home to over 700 food-producing farms and gardens spread over 50 acres of reclaimed lots, rooftops, schoolyards, and public housing grounds. This week at a launch and press event, the Design Trust for Public Space (in partnership with the Brooklyn-based non-profit community farming project Added Value) debuted the most comprehensive survey yet of the city’s urban agricultural infrastructure, Five Borough Farm: Seeding the Future of Urban Agriculture in New York City.

Continue reading after the jump.

Flock Houses Land in New York’s Public Spaces

East
Friday, July 27, 2012
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A "Flock House" in DUMBO, Brooklyn. (Courtesy Mary Mattingly)

A “Flock House” in DUMBO, Brooklyn. (Courtesy Mary Mattingly)

“What if mobile, self-sufficient living units were the building blocks for future cities?” asked New York artist Mary Mattingly. She explored this question in her Flock House Project, experimenting with migratory living solutions through fantastical inhabitable installation art. The project is going on throughout the city this summer.

Mattingly’s series of four “Houses” have been traveling around the five boroughs since June. Individually titled the Microsphere, Terrapod, Chromasphere, and Cacoon, they are now on display at the Bronx Museum, Snug Harbor, the Maiden Lane Exhibition Space, and Omi Sculpture Park in Ghent, NY.

Continue reading after the jump.

NYU Expansion On Its Way To Bloomberg’s Desk.  NYU Passes As was widely expected, NYU cleared its next to last major hurdle yesterday when City Council approved the university’s expansion plan. The only thing left to do is to obtain the assured signature of Mayor Bloomberg. Amidst cries of “Shame!” coming from the public seated in the balcony, the council passed a plan that was reduced in size by 26 percent from the original proposal after all the ULURP parties had weighed in.  

 

NYC Design Commission’s 30th Annual Awards for Excellence

East
Wednesday, July 25, 2012
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Last night's Excellence in Design Awards were held at New York by Gehry (Stoelker/AN)

Last night’s Excellence in Design Awards were held at New York by Gehry (Stoelker/AN)

Last night’s Design Commission Awards for Excellence, like in years past, was held at a recently completed architectural superstar. This year that distinction went to Frank Gehry’s 8 Spruce Street, aka New York by Gehry. The presentation was held in the tower’s base at the Spruce Street School. The school is part of the familiar give and take between the city and developers, where a developer agrees to provide a public amenity in exchange for more floor area and height. The awards are intended for city-commissioned projects on city-owned land, so Gehry’s tower does not qualify. Still, with so much criticism leveled at the tower’s functional brick base where the public school is located, one couldn’t help but wish that the Design Commission had a say in the design, particularly in light of the high quality city-built work shown last night.

See the winners after the jump.

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Sky-High Amusement Parks, Both Imagined and Real

East
Wednesday, July 25, 2012
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Have you ever gazed upon the New York skyline and thought to yourself, there’s an amusement park missing from this picture. Have you ever dreamed of twirling around the top of New York’s fourth-tallest building while strapped into flimsy carnival swings? While it’s certainly not for the faint of heart, these fantasies have been imagined, and now they’ve been rendered into a beautiful new video.

Check out more videos after the jump.

Saturday! Open House New York Explores Spaces for Arts and Design in Red Hook

East
Wednesday, July 25, 2012
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An exhibition space in Red Hook, Brooklyn. (Dustin Yellin)

An exhibition space in Red Hook, Brooklyn. (Dustin Yellin)

OHNYopenstudios in Red Hook
Saturday, July 28, 12:00-5:00 p.m.
Reception to follow at Botanico Cafe, 5:00-7:00 p.m.
Tickets $30 / $20 for students and seniors.
Purchase tickets here.

As part of the Open House New York openstudios series, artists’ studios in Red Hook, Brooklyn will throw open their doors this weekend. Just last week OHNY announced that Dustin Yellin has agreed to open his studio-which must be one of the most beautiful in the city (above). In addition, metalworkers, furniture designers, and glassblowers will be thrown into the mix, making the event a good fabrication tour as well.

The self guided event kicks off Saturday at noon followed by a wine reception with the artisans and tour goers around 5:00 p.m. at Botanico Cafe at 220 Conover Street. The cafe is adjacent to the organic chocolate and Liquor distillery Cacao Prieto also a beautiful Red Hook space. This promises to be one of the most interesting Saturday studio tours in the Open House series and we look forward to seeing you in Brooklyn.

Will New York’s Bike Lanes Last? Gil Penalosa Addresses the Planning Commission

East
Tuesday, July 24, 2012
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The 8th Avenue Complete Streets program keeps cyclists safe from cars and car doors. (Courtesy NYCDOT)

The 8th Avenue Complete Streets program keeps cyclists safe from cars and their doors. (Courtesy NYCDOT)

With only 75 weeks left in New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration, cyclists the city over will inevitably be concerned about the next mayor’s stance on bike lanes and street designs lest initiatives put in place under Bloomberg fall from grace. One need only to recall Marty Markowitz’s parodic tricycle stunts poking fun at bike lanes or former NYC DOT commissioner Iris Weinshall’s efforts to remove a protected bike lane from Brooklyn’s Prospect Park West to realize that the concern is not unfounded.

At yesterday’s regularly-scheduled City Planning review session, former Bogotá Parks Commissioner Gil Penalosa was invited to give a pep talk, placing a particular emphasis on bike lanes. He warned an audience filled with commissioners and planning staff that as the weeks wind down before the mayor leaves office, they’d better get cracking at PR and permanence: the public needs to become even more familiar with the bike network and the infrastructure needs to become permanent—and striped bike lanes won’t cut it!

Continue reading after the jump.

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