On View> Design for the Real World REDUX

East
Tuesday, July 3, 2012
.
(Courtesy White Box)

(Courtesy White Box)

Design for the Real World REDUX
White Box
329 Broome Street, New York
Through July 15

Forty years ago, the Austrian designer and scholar Victor J. Papanek wrote in his influential book Design for the Real World, “Design, if it is to be ecologically responsible and socially responsive, must be revolutionary and radical.” His aim was to alert designers to their impact on the world, arguing for sustainable design generations before the term became a buzzword. This exhibition, organized by the Victor J. Papanek Foundation at the University of Applied Arts Vienna and the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City, in partnership with the Austrian Cultural Forum New York, will showcase four winning entries and thirteen finalists from the inaugural international competition Design for the Real World REDUX. The winning projects include a social mapping platform for local sustainability initiatives, One Laptop Per Child XO-3 Tablet computer by Fuseproject, and Planetary ONE + Terreform ONE’s Urbaneering Brooklyn 2110: Ecological City of the Future, and wind powered streetlights by Alberto Vasquez (above).

Filed Under: ,

Trump Channels Moses at Jones Beach.  The Moses-era cafe was destroyed in 2004. (Courtesy NYState Parks via WSJ) Following a lengthy battle over design issues, Donald Trump and New York State reached a deal over his proposed $23 million catering hall to replace a destroyed Robert Moses-era restaurant at Jones Beach, the Wall Street Journal reported. The new restaurant and catering facility will be called Trump on the Ocean (shown here as a rendering). Officials at Trump told the paper that the developer has fond memories of the beach and has long been an admirer of The Power Broker.

 

Wendy Arrives in Queens

East
Friday, June 29, 2012
.
Wendy scales a wall in the MoMA PS1 courtyard. (Branden Klayko/AN)

Wendy scales a wall in the MoMA PS1 courtyard. (Branden Klayko/AN)

Last night, crowds of young architecture types filled the courtyard at MoMA PS1 in Queens to meet Wendy, this year’s Young Architects Program winner by HWKN. Visible from the nearby elevated subway station and from the streets around MoMA PS1, Wendy is comprised of pollution-fighting fabric spikes set in a grid of scaffolding intersecting the concrete courtyard walls. Yesterday’s crowds were given special access to the interior of the installation, revealing a complex structure of poles, fans, and misters that will cool visitors this summer.

MoMA PS1 will host its annual Warm Up music series in the courtyard beginning on July 7, showcasing “the best in experimental live music, sound, performance, and DJs.” Wendy will officially open to the public on July 1. Meanwhile, at a taxi garage across the street, small fragments of last year’s installation by Interboro called Holding Pattern are still in use on the sidewalk.

View a slideshow after the jump.

On View> The Structural Sculpture of Alan Wiener at Feature Inc.

East
Friday, June 29, 2012
.
Palace of the Clam’s Dream, 2009, by Alan Wiener (Courtesy Feature Inc.)

Palace of the Clam’s Dream, 2009, by Alan Wiener (Courtesy Feature Inc.)

Alan Wiener
Feature Inc.
131 Allen Street, New York
Through June 30

To architects and Chicago residents, Alan Wiener‘s resin sculpture Palace of the Clam’s Dream might evoke the distinctive scalloped plan of Bertrand Goldberg’s Marina Towers complex. While Wiener does admit admiring recent Chicago architecture—namely Studio Gang’s Aqua Tower—the sources of inspiration for his pieces tend to be more ancient, from  Cistercian abbeys to the rock-carved domes of Cappadocia, Turkey, and, in the case of Palace, Japanese netsuke figures. “I like to imagine getting inside these spaces,” said Wiener, aiming to make forms whose nature is ambiguous. Read More

NYU to Take Another Shave on Last Lap of ULURP Process

East
Friday, June 29, 2012
.
NYU's plan encompasses two superblocks south of Washington Square (Courtesy NYU)

NYU's plan encompasses two superblocks south of Washington Square (Courtesy NYU)

The Zoning Committee of the New York City Council is holding a hearing today for NYU’s proposed expansion. It is the last stop on the ULURP tour that has garnered some of the most contentious debate in a neighborhood that has seen more than its share of zoning upheaval over the past year. Usually the council votes in agreement with the council member representing the district. As such, all eyes were on Council Member Margaret Chin, whose Downtown district includes the Washington Square area where the expansion is being proposed. While Chin said that the plan is “unacceptable as it stands” she didn’t outright reject the plan.

Continue reading after the jump.

Videos> 32 Years After Whyte, Seagram Plaza Still a Flurry of Activity

East
Thursday, June 28, 2012
.

For the past eleven years, photographer Jesse David Harris has had unfettered access to two of the most architecturally significant buildings in New York: the Seagram Building and Lever House, both owned by RFR Holdings. As staff photographer for the Lever House Art Collection he began to shoot the Seagram Building with deference to Ezra Stoller. The photographer’s familiarity with the building evolved alongside technology. Last year, Harris began a time-lapse project that reflects his time with Mies van der Rohe’s masterpiece.

Revisit Holly Whyte’s vantage point after the jump.

Diller Scofidio+Renfro Take on Exhibition Design at the Cooper-Hewitt

East
Thursday, June 28, 2012
.
A billboard announces the Cooper Hewitt museum is under renovation.

A billboard announces the Cooper-Hewitt museum is under renovation.

Design studio Diller Scofidio+Renfro (DS+R) has certainly had a very good week. As we noted yesterday, the firm’s designs for the Columbia University Medical and Graduate Education Building in Washington Heights have just been released, and now today, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum has announced that DS+R will be working with museum staff on the redesign of the museum’s exhibition spaces that are currently under renovation on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

Continue reading after the jump.

Michael Graves, Steven Holl Named Academicians of the National Academy

East, National, Shft+Alt+Del
Thursday, June 28, 2012
.

 

The National Academy on 5th Avenue in New York. (Courtesy National Academy)

The National Academy on 5th Avenue in New York. (Courtesy National Academy)

On June 28th, the academicians of the National Academy welcomed 23 newly elected members, recognized for their contribution to American art and architecture. This year, the nominees included artists working in video, photography, and installation, further reinforcing the National Academy’s mission of promoting art across America.  The roster of over 2,000 academicians includes famous pioneers of early American art such as Thomas Cole and seminal architects such as Philip Johnson.

Fukuoka hotel by Michael Graves. (courtesy National Academy)

This year’s inductees include visual artists such as Cindy Sherman and Bruce Nauman and architects Steven Holl and Michael Graves. Chosen annually by their peers, the elected members contributed representative work to the Academy’s permanent collection of over 7,000 artworks, architectural drawings, photographs, and models.

Furness Finale: A Tribute After 100 Years

East
Wednesday, June 27, 2012
.
Dolobran (Courtesy Lower Merion Historical Society)

Dolobran, 1881 (Courtesy Lower Merion Historical Society)

The Friends of Frank Furness Facebook page is lit with tributes to the Philadelphia architect who died 100 years ago today. Furness diehards made the trek to his grave last Sunday. The remains of the civil war veteran and architect were lost until a group seeking to pay tribute to Medal of Honor recipients got in touch with Laurel Hill Cemetery to find him fifteen years ago. A modest military headstone marks the final resting place, but far more impressive monuments, in the form of his masterworks, dot the streetscape of Center City, Philadelphia. Read More

Unveiled> DS+R Designs Columbia’s Medical and Graduate Education Building

East
Wednesday, June 27, 2012
.
(Courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro)

(Courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro)

Medical and Graduate Education Building
Architect: Diller Scofidio + Renfro
Architect of Record: Gensler
Client: Columbia University Medical Center
Location: Haven Avenue and 171st Street
Groundbreaking: Early 2013
Completion: 2016

Columbia University Medical Center has unveiled plans for the Diller Scofidio + Renfro-designed Medical and Graduate Education Building on its campus in Washington Heights. Visible from nearby George Washington Bridge and Riverside Park, the 14-story tower will become a major landmark in the skyline of northern Manhattan, with a south-facing multi-story glass façade punctuated by jutting floorplates and exposed interior spaces.

Continue reading after the jump.

Extell Plays Name Games With West Side Tower

East
Tuesday, June 26, 2012
.
Extell's One Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Extell)

Extell's One Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Extell)

In what may seem like a backhanded vote of confidence for Related Companies’ Hudson Yards development, Extell’s Gary Barnett has revived plans to build on their parcel at Eleventh Avenue between 33rd and 34th streets and he’s unabashedly naming it “One Hudson Yards.” Like Related’s new Coach tower, Extell’s Kohn Pedersen Fox-designed tower will sit on terra firma, while the majority of Related’s multi-use plan will be built atop the functioning rail yards. The proposed tower would rise 56 stories above the No. 7 line entrance. The compliment missed: Related’s Steve Ross told the New York Post that the name was an attempt to “deceive tenants and the public.”

Times’ Take on Topping Four World Trade

East
Monday, June 25, 2012
.
Four Word Trade was topped today. (AN/Stoelker)

Last month, workers climbed skyward at Four Word Trade, which was topped today. (AN/Stoelker)

At a panel discussion on architecture journalism held at the Center for Architecture last month, the New York Post’s Steve Cuozzo griped that The New York Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman had yet to weigh in on the 9/11 Memorial. Indeed, even the Times‘s go-to architecture reporter Robin Pogrebin had to concur. She noted that she too had raised the question. Nevertheless, World Trade Center reporting—let alone criticism—can be a full time job. Although Pogrebin continues to report on the cultural venues slated for the site, the architectural aspects of the project have been the province of David Dunlap from the get-go.

With the topping of Four World Trade today at 977 feet, Dunlap once again provides a highly detailed report, as he did two weeks ago in his analysis of the grossly altered designs of One World Trade. Standing in the shadow of One World Trade, Dunlap notes that architects Fumihiko Maki and Osamu Sassa have no problem with his building being labeled “the biggest skyscraper New Yorkers have never heard of.” “Subtlety extends one’s appreciation,” Sassa told the Times. Kimmelman, meanwhile, has made a trip to the area, but to review a glass canopy, “in the shadow of One World Trade Center no less.”

Page 80 of 149« First...102030...7879808182...90100110...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License