Event> Art, Environment, Action! at Parsons

East
Wednesday, September 26, 2012
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Map-knitting of Union Square. (Courtesy grassrootsmapping.org)

Map-knitting of Union Square. (Courtesy grassrootsmapping.org)

On Friday, the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at The Parsons New School for Design will kick off their annual fall exhibition, Art, Environment, Action!  The 11-week interdisciplinary and interactive laboratory, open to the public, includes workshops, lectures, discussions and a wilderness hike through Greenwich Village. A varied group of contributors, from dancers and chefs to designers and scientists will investigate the common premise of how their interactions within the natural world can be used to bring consciousness to the environment.

In the first event of the showcase, the Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science will host a map-knitting workshop. Participants will remap a public area in the city using an elaborate handmade camera rigging system along with balloons and kites to capture aerial images of the site below. The images will then be posted online and layered atop existing satellite images of the area. The result is an attempt to use maps as communication and a tool in redefining public areas as a community owned territory.

Discover the Landscape Architecture of Washington D.C.

East
Friday, September 21, 2012
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Meridian Hill (Malcom X) Park  (Photo Credit: Glenn LaRue Smith, ASLA)

Meridian Hill (Malcom X) Park (Photo Credit: Glenn LaRue Smith, ASLA)

Washington, D.C., is often admired for its monuments. Now there is another part of our nation’s capital that its 19 million annual visitors can tour and enjoy. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has recently announced the launch of an online mobile-friendly guide meant to give not only tourist, but also locals a new perspective on the historic, modern, and contemporary landscapes in Washington, D.C. and Arlington, VA.

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On View> From Farm to City: Staten Island 1616–2012

East
Thursday, September 20, 2012
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(Courtesy MCNY)

(Courtesy MCNY)

From Farm to City: Staten Island 1616–2012
Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Avenue
Through January 21, 2013

From Farm to City: Staten Island 1616–2012 explores the history, evolution, and future of New York’s often overlooked fifth borough. The island has served as the city’s breadbasket, a pastoral escape for the city’s elite, an industrial center, an international port, and a toehold for new immigrant communities. Divided into four sections—Farms, Pleasure Grounds, Suburbs, and City—the exhibition examines the major forces that have shaped land use on the island, including the development of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. The exhibition includes historic photographs, maps, and other ephemera and objects, as well as an online mapping component tracing the chronology of major developments on the island.

More images after the jump.

Koons, Meier Among Design Selection Team for Tappan Zee Replacement Bridge

East
Wednesday, September 19, 2012
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Jeffery Koons, perhaps best known for his quirky stainless steel glossy sculptural reproductions of balloon dogs, has been called upon by Governor Andrew Cuomo to help decide what the new Tappan Zee bridge will look like. Koons, along with Richard Meier, winner of the Pritzker Prize for Architecture, and Thomas Campbell, Metropolitan Museum of Art Director, were named to the selection design team that will provide counsel on the construction of the Tappan Zee replacement bridge.  Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the decision in a press conference Wednesday. Meier’s most notable work includes the Getty Center in Los Angeles, the Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art and the Jubilee Church in Rome. The design team will offer advice on the bridge’s aesthetics and visual compatibility with the surrounding nature.

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DOT INTRODUCES NEW STREET SAFETY CAMPAIGN

East, East Coast
Wednesday, September 19, 2012
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“Safety is in the eye of the beholder,” says New York City DOT Commissioner Sadik Khan. Khan’s remarks came Wednesday as the New York City Department of Transportation unveiled its new LOOK! safety campaign urging self-responsibility on the part of drivers and pedestrians alike. The updated campaign features thermoplastic curbside lettering spelling L-O-O-K with appropriately focused eyeballs replacing the O’s on crosswalks at 110 of the most fatality ridden intersections across the city. The street markings are accompanied by witty color photograph ads on nearby phone stalls, bus shelters, and the backs of city buses warning us to heed our mothers’ advice and look both ways before crossing the street. The campaign plans to eventually increase their range to include 200 intersections and more than 300 buses.

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The Grass Looks Greener On The Riverside

East, East Coast
Tuesday, September 18, 2012
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WNYC Transmitter Park Waterfront (Photo Credit: juliewoodnyc via Instagram)

WNYC Transmitter Park Waterfront (Photo Credit: juliewoodnyc via Instagram)

Green outdoor space, outside of Central Park, is often thought of as a rare commodity in New York City; but now it doesn’t have to be. The recent opening of WNYC’s Transmitter Park on the East River in Greenpoint, Brooklyn is one of the many projects that will be improving over 500 miles of shoreline across the city.

Breaking ground back in 2010, Transmitter Park is now finally open for the public to enjoy. As part of the Waterfront Vision and Enhancement Strategy(WAVES) citywide initiative, Transmitter Park supports the plan’s vision to provide more open recreational space for the city’s residents and a functional waterfront that will no longer display decaying industrial sites. The park is also a result of the 2005 Greenpoint-Williamsburg rezoning meant to provide local residents and visitors with continuous public access to the waterfront.  The new park includes1.6-acres of open space with an esplanade for passive recreation, a new overlook to the south, new seating, and a pedestrian bridge built across an excavated historic ferry slip. The center of the park offers a large open lawn with a nautical themed children’s play area that reflects the site’s context, spray showers, and nature gardens.

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Event>Olmsted on Staten Island: The Rural Laboratory

East
Tuesday, September 18, 2012
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1848 Olmsted (Courtesy of  Museum of the City of New York)

1848 Olmsted (Courtesy of Museum of the City of New York)

Frederick Law Olmsted, designer of Central Park, spent nine formative years on a 130-acre farm on the southern shore of Staten Island. Olmsted’s involvement in agricultural experimentation and nature conversation allowed him to develop his own thoughts about open space and urban settings. At 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 19th join Alan G. Brake, executive editor of The Architect’s Newspaper, at the Museum of the City of New York as he moderates a discussion exploring how Olmsted’s time on Staten Island influenced the field of American landscape architecture and the timeless parks he designed for the city. Included on the panel will be Ryan J. Carey, co-curator of From Farm to City; Tatiana Choulika, Associate Partner at James Corner Field Operations; and Gus Jones, Snug Harbor Heritage Farm Manager. The panel is also in conjunction with the museum’s exhibition From Farm to City: Staten Island, 1661-2012. 

EAT MY DUST.  Nicolai Ouroussoff. (Courtesy Charlie Rose) Former New York Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff reemerged recently in an unexpected location: the pages of Smithsonian magazine, where Ouroussoff profiled Rem Koolhaas for the venerable publication. Those who read the piece online may not realize that Ouroussoff is one of the writers featured in Smithsonian’s September issue, which marks the debut of the magazine’s sleek redesign initiated by editor-in-chief Michael Caruso. “The main idea was to rev it up,” Caruso told Adweek of his changes to the staid cover, layout, and contribitor’s list. Smithsonian’s monthly print circulation has already risen under Caruso—it currently sits at 2.1 million, giving Ouroussoff’s feature almost twice the reach that it would have had in the Sunday Times.

 

Oscar Niemeyer’s Buildings As Never Seen Before

East, Newsletter
Friday, September 14, 2012
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Cathedral of Brasilia. (Vicente de Paulo/Courtesy Paddle 8)

Cathedral of Brasilia. (Vicente de Paulo/Courtesy Paddle 8)

Grab your 3D glasses, the artists at Visionaire, an art and fashion publisher, have added dramatic new depth to architectural photography. The work of Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer, who brought Modern design to Sao Paolo, Brasilia, and Rio de Janeiro, has now been optimized for viewing through stereoscope lenses. Just as Niemeyer innovated architectural design, making soft, delicate curves out of his concrete buildings, the international team of artists at Visionaire are advancing stereoscopic design and traditional ways of viewing cities, neatly packaging 3D scenes of modern Brazil against Niemeyer’s landscape into lenticular cases featuring the art of Fernando and Humberto Campana and Beatriz Milhazes on its exterior.

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Save Your Best Moves for Beaux Arts Ball 2012

East
Thursday, September 13, 2012
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Williamsburgh Savings Bank Interior (Courtesy Architectural League)

Williamsburgh Savings Bank Interior (Courtesy Architectural League)

The Architectural League of New York has recently announced the theme and location of it’s annual Beaux Arts Ball for 2012.  The event itself will be held on Saturday, September 22, in the Williamsburgh Savings Bank in Downtown Brooklyn. Emerging architects SOFTlab will be in charge of realizing this year’s theme, “Tender,” within the space. Read More

Perkins+Will Eyes Platinum on a Budget

East, Newsletter
Thursday, September 13, 2012
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A rendering of the stair atrium, shows region where the teaching wing meets the research wing.

A rendering of the stair atrium, shows region where the teaching wing meets the research wing.

Next month Lehman College CUNY will dedicate its $70 million Science Hall designed by Perkins+Will. The new Bronx facility will abut Gillet Hall, one of the campus’ depression-era gothic buildings, while sparring with Raphael Viñoly’s massive metallic wave-like gymnasium called the Apex. “We tried an elegant yet simple form that enhances the sculptural quality of the Viñoly building, so as not to try to compete against it, but to act as a foil,” said Robert Goodwin, design director at Perkins+Will. “And we maintained a strong relationship to Gillet Hall.”

Continue reading after the jump.

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Kiosks Nixed from Met’s OLIN-designed Plaza.  OLIN's Met PlazaOLIN’s Met Plaza After its tony neighbors complained, the Metropolitan Museum of Art dropped plans for kiosks selling refreshments and tickets in a proposed plaza designed by OLIN, reports DNAinfo. The Met has been courting the nearby co-ops in monthly meetings, and doesn’t want the $60 million project to be held up. Construction is slated to begin in October. The community at large will get another gander at the construction plans at tomorrow night’s Community Board 8 meeting.

 

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