New Renderings Detail Kohn Pedersen Fox’s One Hudson Yards

East
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
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rendering of Extell's KPF-designed One Hudson Yards tower. (Courtesy One Hudson Yards)

Rendering of Extell’s KPF-designed One Hudson Yards tower. (Courtesy One Hudson Yards)

With both the Hudson Yards and Manhattan West mega-developments underway on Manhattan’s West Side, several other projects in the area are coming into closer focus. Among them, Extell’s structurally criss-crossed Kohn Pedersen Fox-designed tower across 11th Avenue from Hudson Yards proper taking the name of its larger neighbor: One Hudson Yards. New York YIMBY spotted a bevy of new renderings of the 877-foot-tall diagrid tower posted to a just-launched project website. At 56 floors, the tower, shown with a wavy ledge peeling up the building’s facade at its main entrance, will front the Michael Van Valkenburgh-designed linear park, Hudson Boulevard, where the new Dattner-designed 7 line subway will emerge through glass canopies.

More renderings after the jump.

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Future of Gehry’s World Trade Center Performing Arts Center Still Uncertain

East
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
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 A rendering of a preliminary design of performing arts center at World Trade Center site (Courtesy of Gehry Partners via The New York Times)

Model of a preliminary design for the WTC performing arts center. (Courtesy Gehry Partners via NY Times)

It is not uncommon for projects to change over time, but the performing arts center planned for the World Trade Center site has undergone many iterations. It has been tweaked, downsized, refocused, delayed, and at one point, possibly re-located to another site. Now, the New York Times reported that the center has been whittled down from a four-stage arts complex housing multiple cultural organizations—including the International Freedom Center, Signature Theater, the Drawing Center, and the Joyce Theater—to a multidisciplinary arts space with just one main stage. The Joyce Theater is the only remaining organization that will still be part of the center, though it will not be based at the World Trade Center site as previously planned.

The next step is to find an artistic director who can oversee center and curate its programming. Frank Gehry has been working on the design of the center, but the recent changes have called for him to scale it back. Once costs and programming are nailed down, the preliminary board will move forward with fundraising efforts. Right now, though, it looks like the center won’t open its doors until 2017 or 2018.

Moleskine Opens First US Store In New York City.  Moleskine Opens First US Store In New York City Look under the arm of just about any architect and you might notice a small black notebook. The popular Italian journal maker Moleskine has just opened its first stand-alone retail store in the United States on Friday inside New York’s Time Warner Center. Like other Moleskine stores, the Columbus Circle outpost features a map on the floor and carries a full line of products including journals, pens, bags, and digital accessories. (Photo: Courtesy Moleskine)

 

With Casino Licence Up For Grabs in Philly, Developers Betting On City Center

East
Tuesday, March 26, 2013
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The proposed Market 8 in downtown Philly. (Courtesy of Market East Associates)

The proposed Market 8 in downtown Philly. (Courtesy Market East Associates)

After a Foxwoods casino went bust in Philadelphia, an elusive casino license has been up for grabs, and proposals for a new facility have been pouring in over the Philly region. Six developers are competing for the city’s second casino license, and two of the proposals are betting on Downtown. Curbed reported that while the majority of the proposed developments are planned for the outer edges of Philly, two proposals intend on building right in the heart of the city.

Continue reading after the jump.

Selldorf Architects To Restore Grand Reading Room at Brown University

East
Monday, March 25, 2013
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The John Hay Library at Brown University. (Mr. Ducke / Flickr)

The John Hay Library at Brown University. (Mr. Ducke / Flickr)

While some of the new architecture at Brown University is distinctly modern, Manhattan-based Selldorf Architects has been selected to bring back the historic charm of the circa 1910 English Renaissance John Hay Library. According to the Brown Daily Herald, the project was jumpstarted in February following an anonymous $3 million donation, plus another anonymous $6 million donation for the renovation from 2011. The Hay Library, which houses the university’s rare books collection, archives, and other special collections, will be reconfigured to open up the grand 4,400-square-foot reading room to its original design by Boston architects Shepley Rutan & Coolidge. The room is currently divided into parts to securely store sensitive books. The larger space will allow more access to the public and can play host to larger university-related events.

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New York City Council Approves SHoP-Designed Pier 17 Makeover at the South Street Seaport

East
Monday, March 25, 2013
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Proposed changes to Pier 17. (Courtesy SHoP)

Proposed changes to Pier 17. (Courtesy SHoP)

Last Wednesday, the New York City Council unanimously approved plans to tear down the current Pier 17 in the South Street Seaport and build a new $200 million SHoP Architects-designed mall in its place, marking the end of the long and sometimes contentious ULURP approval process. Crain’s reported that Dallas-based developer Howard Hughes made some concessions to the council including pushing back construction on the project to allow Hurricane Sandy-battered tenants to have an additional summer season, with construction now anticipated to begin on October 1st.

Continue reading after the jump.

Slideshow> Squibb Pedestrian Bridge Bounces Into Brooklyn Bridge Park

East
Monday, March 25, 2013
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The Squibb Pedestrian Bridge in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Branden Klayko / AN)

The Squibb Pedestrian Bridge in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Branden Klayko / AN)

HNTB’s Squibb Park Pedestrian Bridge connecting the Brooklyn Heights Promenade with Brooklyn Bridge Park opened to the public last Thursday. The $4.9 million bridge was built using “trail bridge technology” with galvanized steel cables and cylindrical black locust timbers, providing an efficient and lightweight structure that, as a sign at the entrance to the bridge warns, quite literally puts a bounce in visitors’ steps. “The bridge is very light weight. You will feel yourself walking across the bridge,” HNTB’s Chief Engineer Ted Zoli said at a construction tour in December. On AN‘s visit to the bridge Friday morning, traversing the spans did in fact provide a bouncy effect.

More photos after the jump.

Pittsburgh The Latest To Join the Bike Sharing Game

East
Monday, March 25, 2013
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Mockup of a bikeshare system in Pittsburgh. (Courtesy City of Pittsburgh)

Mockup of a bike share system in Pittsburgh. (Courtesy City of Pittsburgh)

Pittsburgh is the latest in a long line of cities preparing to launch a bike share system. According to the Bike PGH blog, Mayor Ravenstahl announced the 500-bike, 50-station program earlier this month. Similar to systems in other cities, bikes will be available for short-term rides for a small fee. Portland, OR-based Alta Planning and Design will partner with the city to launch the system, the same company involved with New York, Washington DC, and other major bike share systems. More information will be available at two community meetings scheduled for April 2nd and 3rd. The city hopes to roll out the new bikes in 2014.

Herald Center—From Discount Drab to LED Luminous

East, Newsletter
Monday, March 25, 2013
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Proposed facade for the Herald Center mall.

Proposed facade for the Herald Center mall. (Courtesy Moed de Armas & Shannon)

Located at one of the busiest intersections in Manhattan—and probably the world—the outdated Herald Center has recently been slated for a $50 million facelift by Moed de Armas & Shannon architecture firm. Hailing from the 1980s, the tinted black windows on the first three floors will be replaced with sheer insulated glass, while the façade of the remaining floors is transformed to offer passersby an LED-lit view befitting the luminous Times Square a few blocks north.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pending Sale of Philadelphia’s Roundhouse Police Headquarters Spurs Campaign for Landmark Status

East
Friday, March 22, 2013
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The Roundhouse Police Headquarters (Courtesy of Save the Roundhouse)

The Roundhouse Police Headquarters (Courtesy of Save the Roundhouse)

It has been a rough few months for modernist civic buildings. First, the Commission on Chicago Landmarks denied Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Women’s Hospital landmark status, and then came the demolition of Richard Neutra’s Gettysburg Cyclorama, and now the future of The Roundhouse, Philadelphia’s Police Headquarters, hangs in the balance. Last week, during his budget address, Mayor Nutter brought to light the city’s plan to renovate the Provident Mutual Life Insurance Building at 4601 Market Street and turn it into the new police headquarters (to be shared with the City Morgue and the Health Center). Nutter said that the move would mean selling the Roundhouse, along with several other municipal buildings. PlanPhilly reported that the city would pay for the renovation of 4601 Market Street with long-term borrowing, but the costs of the project “would be offset by the sale of the three would-be surplus municipal properties.”

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Before SHoP’s Domino Sugar Plan, Brooklyn To See Urban Farming and Bikes

East
Thursday, March 21, 2013
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Domino Sugar Factory Site E marked in red. (Courtesy Bing Maps)

Domino Sugar Factory Site E marked in red. (Courtesy Bing Maps)

While Two Trees still needs to make it through the ULURP process before breaking ground on its SHoP Architects-designed mixed-use development for the Domino Sugar site on the Brooklyn Waterfront, the developer has just announced plans for Site E, a vacant parcel on the corner of Kent Avenue and South 3rd. A large section of the 55,000-square-foot lot will be dedicated to a community green space run by North Brooklyn Farms that will host a range of Brooklyn-friendly activities and classes from yoga to urban farming. And on the western side, there will be a bike course, organized by New York City Mountain Bike Association, with areas for riders of all levels. This new urban farm-meets-bike recreation spot will open to the public in May and close once construction commences on the development.

New York City Council Approves Hudson Square Rezoning.  Aerial view of Hudson Square. (Courtesy Hudson Square BID) Development is soon on the horizon for Hudson Square, the 18-block area sandwiched between Soho and Tribeca. Yesterday New York City Council approved the Hudson Square rezoning, which entails raising the allowable building height to pave the way for more residential and mixed-use development. The city was able to finagle more affordable housing and open space throughout the approval process. From the get-go, preservationists have feared that development will seep into the South Village and have pressed the city to landmark the entire district. City Council has worked out a deal with Landmarks Preservation Commission to vote on the northern section of South Village by the end of the year.

 

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