Morris Adjmi Designs 13-Story Apartment Building for Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Architecture, East, Unveiled
Wednesday, June 11, 2014
.
Adjmi's 282 South 5th Street in Brooklyn. (Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects)

Adjmi’s 282 South 5th Street in Brooklyn. (Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects)

A rendering has been released for a Morris Adjmi-designed apartment building in South Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Curbed reported that the 13-story building contains 82 rentals and 26,000-square-feet of landscaped space; the base of the building has about 30,000-square-feet for retail, and a nearly 7,000-square-foot community space. The under-construction structure is located just steps from the J,M,Z subway lines, and only a few block inland from the Domino Sugar Factory

Read More

ASLA New York to Honor Rebuild by Design Champion, Leader of Governors Island

Governors Island (Courtesy The Trust for Governors Island)

The head of the Trust for Governors Island is among those being honored. (Timothy Schenck)

The New York chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year at the 2014 President’s Dinner Gala. For this occasion, the ASLA has selected the Rockefeller Foundation’s Judith Rodin, the Trust for Governors Island’s Leslie Koch, and the NY1 News Organization as their honored guests.

Read More

Kentile Floors Sign in Gowanus Brooklyn is (Likely) Doomed

Art, Design, Development, East, Preservation
Wednesday, June 11, 2014
.
The Kentile Sign in Gowanus. (Flickr /

The Kentile Sign in Gowanus. (Flickr / ekonon)

The industrial past of Gowanus, Brooklyn is rapidly disappearing as the neighborhood transitions into a more mixed-use future. As the low-slung factories and warehouses continue to disappear, the iconic, eight-story, Kentile Floors sign could go with it.

Read More

Junior’s Grows Up: 1,000-Foot-Tall Tower Could Rise at Site of Famous Brooklyn Eatery

Development, East, Skyscrapers
Tuesday, June 10, 2014
.
Junior's in Downtown Brooklyn. (Flickr / Joseph)

Junior’s in Downtown Brooklyn. (Flickr / Joseph a)

Brooklyn’s newest, tallest tower could rise on the site of one of the borough’s—nay the the city’s—most famous restaurants: Junior’s. TheNew York Times reported that bidding on the Downtown Brooklyn site, which houses some of the world’s best cheesecake and notably hosted President Barack Obama on a recent trip, begins this week. Crunching the numbers, the newspaper found that developers could assemble enough air rights to build a 1,000-foot-tall tower on the lot. This part of Brooklyn has seen a surge in new towers in recent years, but, as of now, the tallest building—388 Bridge—tops out under 600 feet.

Letter to the Editor> Addressing themselves to the Skyline

East, Letter to the Editor
Tuesday, June 10, 2014
.
High above Manhattan. (FLICKR / CARUBA)

High above Manhattan. (FLICKR / CARUBA)

[ Editor's Note: The following are reader-submitted responses in reference to William Menking’s editorial “Will de Blasio Make Progress on Design?” (AN 05_04.09.2014). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

In your editorial “Will de Blasio Make Progress on Design?”, you seem to suggest that there is an inherent conflict between the development priorities of the new administration and the accepted tenets of good urban design. We disagree.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Your Work is Worth the Price of Admission (and so Much More)

Architecture, Art, East, Eavesdroplet
Tuesday, June 10, 2014
.
Construction of the new Whitney Museum in February 2014. (Timothy Schenck)

Construction of the new Whitney Museum in February 2014. (Timothy Schenck)

Major museums are really expensive these days, and boy do we like to complain about it (actually we get into most museums for free with a press pass, but we still love to complain about it)! Well gather ‘round dear readers, because we’ve got a bit of nice news for once. The new Renzo Piano–designed Whitney Museum is offering free admission for a year to all the men and women who are building their new Meatpacking location. It’s a nice counter to all the bad news about labor conditions at major cultural and educational institutions in the Middle East (we’re looking at you, NYU).

Washington Monument Re-Opens to the Public: Celebrate With These 22 Beautiful Photos

The Washington Monument stands tall over Washington, D.C. at sunset. (Victoria Pickering / Flickr)

The Washington Monument stands tall over Washington, D.C. at sunset. (Victoria Pickering / Flickr)

After two-and-a-half years of repairs, the Washington Monument is officially back open to the public. The District’s tallest structure had been closed since 2011, when a 5.8 magnitude earthquake sent more than 150 cracks shooting through the 555-feet of marble.

Continue reading after the jump.

Beach-Topped Barge Proposed For Hudson River

City Beach. (Courtesy

City Beach. (Courtesy workshop/apd)

As New York City’s +Pool—the world’s first floating swimming pool—gets closer to the water, it was high-time for another river-based project to make itself known. The latest comes in the form of City Beach NYC, a beach-topped barge that would float in the Hudson River. The idea for the vessel comes from Blayne Ross, and it was designed and engineered by Matt Berman, and Andrew Kotchen from workshop/apd, and Nathaniel Stanton of Craft Engineering.

Continue reading after the jump.

Nine-Story Woolworth Building Penthouse To Be Listed for $110 Million

The Woolworth Penthouse. (FlICKR / massmatt)

The Woolworth Penthouse. (FlICKR / massmatt)

At this point, the record breaking sales of luxury apartments in Midtown are not really news. As the towers rise higher, so do the prices. This has been the trend for quite some time and it shows no signs of slowing down. With that said, did you hear about the one Downtown? Bloomberg reported that the nine-story penthouse at Cass Gilbert’s Woolworth Building is expected to be listed for $110 million. The top 30 floors of the tower are currently being converted into luxury apartments, but the penthouse is quite literally Woolworth’s crown jewel—and it is priced as such.

Continue reading after the jump.

Van Alen Institute Convenes International Council of Architects in Venice

The Van Alen Council meets in Venice. (Beppe Ferrari)

The Van Alen Council meets in Venice. (Beppe Ferrari)

This week in Venice, the New York–based Van Alen Institute convened a group of leaders at 13 top architecture firms to brainstorm ideas that will guide the non-profit institution with an increased international perspective. The group will meet twice a year “to identify and investigate issues facing cities internationally, and to guide the impact of the Institute’s public programming, research, and design competitions,” according to a press release from Van Alen. The goal is to find topics that the institute can explore more deeply in its ongoing efforts such as Elsewhere: Escape and the Urban Landscape exploring our relationship with urban life.

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: ,

Renderings Revealed for Kevin Roche and Kohn Pedersen Fox’s 55 Hudson Yards Tower

The metallic and glass facade. (Courtesy Related)

The metallic and glass facade. (Courtesy Related)

As with most new towers these days, the offices and apartments rising at Hudson Yards are unsurprisingly wrapped in glossy, glass skins. That is why revised renderings for the new kid on the block, 55 Hudson Yards, are so notable. The 51-story office tower has plenty of floor-to-ceiling windows, but those windows are framed by a metallic grid that encases the entire building. At certain points that metallic wrap disappears as if space has been carved out of the building’s exterior.

Continue reading after the jump.

With Foster Out, New York Public Library Announces Revised Plans for its Main Branch

Architecture, East, News, Preservation
Wednesday, June 4, 2014
.
The New York Public Library branch in Midtown Manhattan. (Wikimedia Commons)

The New York Public Library in Midtown Manhattan. (Wikimedia Commons)

After the New York Public Library scrapped Foster + Partners’ controversial redesign of its main branch—which would have removed the famous book stacks to create an atrium-like research library—the institution has announced a more modest path forward. The cost of Foster’s plan was originally slated to cost $300 million, but, according to independent estimates, the final tab could have topped $500 million. Now, the project has been scaled back.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 5 of 149« First...34567...102030...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License