New York City’s New Amsterdam Market Will Not Return

East, News, Preservation
Tuesday, July 15, 2014
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New Amsterdam Market. (Flickr / Garrett Ziegler)

New Amsterdam Market. (Flickr / Garrett Ziegler)

After seven years in business, the New Amsterdam Market near New York City’s South Street Seaport is closing up shop. “We held a total 88 markets and numerous innovative celebrations of our region’s bounty; supported nearly 500 food entrepreneurs; and contributed to the creation of more than 350 jobs,” Robert LaValva, the market’s founder, said in a statement. “However, I was never able to raise the funding or attract the influential backers needed for our organization to thrive.”

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BREAKING: Martino Stierli tapped as MoMA’s Chief Curator of Architecture and Design

Martino Stierli. (Courtesy NCCR Iconic Criticism, University of Basel/Alessandro Frigerio)

Martino Stierli. (Courtesy NCCR Iconic Criticism, University of Basel/Alessandro Frigerio)

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has announced that Martino Stierli has been appointed as the Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design. Mr. Stierli is currently a professor at the University of Zurich where he teaches the history of modern architecture. Previously, he has organized or co-curated exhibitions at prestigious venues around the world, taught at multiple Swiss universities, and published multiple essays on various topics relating to design. He steps into his new role in March, 2015.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City allocates $5.8 million to stabilize Philip Johnson’s New York State Pavilion

The Tent of Tomorrow. (Henry Melcher / AN)

The Tent of Tomorrow. (Henry Melcher / AN)

After decaying for years, the New York State Pavilion from the 1964 World’s Fair is getting some TLC. The New York Times reported that $5.8 million was allocated in New York City’s budget to stabilize the Philip Johnson–designed pavilion in Queens.

More after the jump.

Architect proposes a landscaped cycle track to tame one deadly Florida street

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From the West Coast of Portland, OR to the East Coast of New York City, designated cyclist and pedestrian lanes called cycle tracks are realigning pavement away from motor vehicles and creating safe infrastructure for bikes. Architect and avid cyclist Bernard Zyscovich has proposed such an infrastructure upgrade in Miami-Dade, Florida that would convert a killer expressway into a cycle super highway.
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New Drawings Appear for 225 West 57th Street – The Tallest Residential Building in the World

Drawings of Nordstrom Tower. (Via NY YIMBY)

Drawings of Nordstrom Tower. (Via NY YIMBY)

New details have emerged on New York’s latest, tallest, super-tall skyscraper—the Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill–designed tower rising on, where else, 57th Street. Real estate blog NY YIMBY has uncovered new drawings for 225 West 57th Street, which will rise to a height within one foot of One World Trade Center.

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SOM Unveils Second Station for Florida’s Commuter Rail System

All Aboard Florida's Ft. Lauderdale station. (Courtesy SOM)

All Aboard Florida’s Ft. Lauderdale station. (Courtesy SOM)

In May, SOM released renderings for Miami Station—a 1,000-foot-long, multimodal transit hub that would anchor the Sunshine State’s impending high-speed commuter rail system known as All Aboard Florida. The firm floated the station 50 feet atop reinforced concrete trusses to allow for restaurants and retail, and an uninterrupted street grid. Now, with the Miami station getting underway, SOM has unveiled plans for the system’s Ft. Lauderdale station, and it appears that a design trend is emerging down in Florida.

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Pittsburgh’s Mellon Square Returned to Its Modernist Roots

The refurbished fountain and stairway. (Courtesy Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy)

The refurbished fountain and stairway. (Courtesy Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy)

After five years and $10 million, Pittsburgh’s Mellon Square has been returned to its mid-century splendor. Dedicated in 1955, the Square served as a modern, green oasis in a city choked by pollution. But only a few decades after opening, the modern masterpiece had fallen into disrepair, its former glory hidden by cracked pavement, broken fountains, pigeons, and empty planters. As Pittsburgh has transformed itself in recent years, so to has Mellon Square. Now, the reborn space is yet another example of the Steel City’s promising future.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York Design Commission Announces Excellence in Design Winners

Architecture, Awards, Design, East
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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LeFrak Center at Lakeside. (Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects)

LeFrak Center at Lakeside. (Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects)

Winners of the 32nd Annual Awards for Excellence in Design were announced last night at the Thomas Leeser–designed BRIC Arts Media House in Brooklyn’s emerging Cultural District. Mayor Bill de Blasio was on hand to honor the winning projects, which were selected by the city’s Design Commission. “While Brooklyn is my home borough, I am proud to be awarding a diverse group of projects representing all five New York City boroughs,” the mayor said in a statement. “This year’s winners exemplify the Design Commission’s mission to enhance every New Yorker’s quality of life through public design, regardless of their size or location of the project.”  The 10 winning proposals are all unbuilt, but two special recognition awards were awarded to Tod Williams Billie Tsien’s LeFrak Center in Prospect Park and Louis Kahn’s Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island.

On to the winners…

On View> Designing for Disaster at the National Building Museum

Elevate

An elevated model home in Biloxi, Mississippi, designed by architect Marlon Blackwell in 2009 as part of an Architecture for Humanity Initiative, incorporates resilient and affordable design with porch living—an important part of local culture. (Timothy Hursley)

Designing for Disaster
National Building Museum
401 F Street NW, Washington, D.C.
Through August 2, 2015

The National Building Museum’s newest exhibition, Designing for Disaster, will explore how communities assess risks from natural hazards and how we can create policies, plans, and designs that create safer, more disaster-resilient communities. The two central questions that the exhibit addresses are where and how we should build.

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The Music City’s New Urbanism: The Nine Projects Leading Nashville’s Transformation

Nashville at night. (joshunter / Flickr)

Nashville at night. (joshunter / Flickr)

For many, architecture isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when considering Nashville—it’s called the Music City for a reason. But there is more to Nashville than country songs, barbecue ribs, and the eponymous show on ABC. In recent years, the city of 600,000 has become a regional leader in smart urban design and distinctive architecture. New riverfront parks are transforming Nashville’s connection to the Cumberland River, bikeshare docks have appeared around downtown, bus rapid transit is in the works, and the city’s tallest tower is set to rise. And that’s just the start of it. Take a look at the city’s dramatic transformation and a peek at where it’s headed.

Continue reading after the jump.

Alexander Gorlin Wraps Supportive Housing in a Binary Skin

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Located in the Bronx, The Brook provides housing and support services for the formerly homeless and individuals living with HIV/AIDS. (Courtesy Alexander Gorlin Architects)

Located in the Bronx, The Brook provides housing and support services for the formerly homeless and individuals living with HIV/AIDS. (Courtesy Alexander Gorlin Architects)

An aluminum rain screen and locally-sourced brick articulate a two-part program.

The Brook, developed by Common Ground and designed by Alexander Gorlin Architects, is part of a new wave of affordable housing communities popping up all over the United States. Unlike the public housing projects of the mid-twentieth century, which focused exclusively on housing and tended to suffer from a lack of routine maintenance, The Brook, located in the Bronx, combines apartments and support services under one roof. This duality is manifested in the envelope’s contrasting material palette—dark grey brick for the residential spaces, raw aluminum over the community facilities. “The idea of the exterior was to symbolize, as well as reflect, the internal program of Common Ground as supportive housing,” said Alexander Gorlin. “It’s inspired in part by Le Corbusier and his idea of expressing the program on the facade, and expressing the public functions as a means of interrupting a repetitive facade.” Read More

SHoP Architects Designing Brooklyn’s Newest, Tallest Tower

The site of SHoP's future tower, next to the City Point development.

The site of SHoP’s future tower, next to the City Point development.

SHoP Architects has racked up another major project in Brooklyn. The firm behind the Barclays Center and the Domino Sugar Factory redevelopment, is designing Brooklyn’s newest, tallest tower. NY YIMBY spotted building permits for 340 Flatbush Avenue Extension in Downtown Brooklyn, where the firm’s 775-foot-tall, 495-unit building will rise.

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