Situ Studio’s Hurricane Sandy-Salvaged “Heartwalk” Installation Under Construction

East
Wednesday, February 6, 2013
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(Courtesy Situ Studio)

(Courtesy Situ Studio)

Next week, the fifth iteration of the Times Square Alliance’s Valentine Heart installation will officially open to the public. Brooklyn-based Situ Studio revealed their installation, Heartwalk, in January, which will be built with salvaged boardwalk boards from from the Hurricane Sandy-stricken Rockaways, Long Beach, Sea Girt, NJ, and Atlantic City.

The Situ team has been busy removing hardware from the weathered planks and planing them for a smooth surface. The pre-assembled pieces will be taken to Times Square for assembly, and a ribbon-cutting ceremony will take place on February 12 at 11:00a.m. According to a statement from Situ Studio, “Visitors can enter the installation itself and literally stand in the heart of the world’s greatest city.”

More photos after the jump.

Growing Governors Island: Developer Sought for 33 Acres

East
Wednesday, February 6, 2013
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Aerial view of Governors Island. (AJP79 / Flickr)

Aerial view of Governors Island. (AJP79 / Flickr)

Development on Governors Island isn’t slowing down any time soon. With construction of the new park by West 8 well underway, the Trust for Governor’s Island has moved on to the next project: the south part of the island. The organization has issued a Request for Expressions of Interest (RFEI) for development of 33 acres. The organization is inviting developers, non-profits, and institutions to submit ideas ranging from commercial and educational to cultural.

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Proposal Aims to Put Penn Station’s Move Back on Track

East
Tuesday, February 5, 2013
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The James Farley Post Office (Courtesy of Cristian/Flodigrip's World/Flickr)

The James Farley Post Office. (Courtesy of Cristian/Flodigrip’s World/Flickr)

The plan to relocate Pennsylvania Station to the James Farley Post Office across the street has been slow in coming. The developers, Related Companies and Vornado Realty Trust, are now revisiting a previously-rejected proposal to move the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) to what will be Penn Station’s new home, called Moynihan Station—named after Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan who first introduced the idea in the 1990s.

The New York Times reported that the college would theoretically occupy 1.1 million square feet of the building, and in return, the developer would take over BMCC’s campus downtown. But, it looks like government officials still have their reservations. Some progress has been made, however. The state has provided around $300 million for the construction of a new passageway and two new entrances leading to Penn’s train platforms. Skidmore, Owings and Merrill designed the plans for the renovation of the station.

A Touch of DUMBO in Williamsburg: Two Trees Envisions Office Space at the Domino Sugar Factory

East
Monday, February 4, 2013
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Domino Sugar Factory (Courtesy of Greenpoint waterfront Association for Parks and Planning)

Domino Sugar Factory. (Courtesy Greenpoint Waterfront Association for Parks and Planning)

The redevelopment of Brooklyn’s Domino Sugar Factory has been a long and controversial process, but is showing signs of progress, or at least a slow but steady crawl to the next phase of planning. The Wall Street Journal reported reported that developer Jed Walentas of Two Trees Management wants to make room for office space in addition to residential units long proposed for the site. The Brooklyn-based firm purchased the 11-acre property last October for $185 million from Community Preservation Corporation Resources (CPCR).

Continue reading after the jump.

Hudson Square to Soar to New Heights With New Zoning

East
Monday, February 4, 2013
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Aerial view of Hudson Square. (Courtesy Hudson Square BID)

Aerial view of Hudson Square. (Courtesy Hudson Square BID)

The New York Department of City Planning just approved a rezoning plan of Hudson Square that could likely change the scale of the neighborhood. Developers and landlords can now raise the building height to 290 feet along wide streets, which will make Hudson Square, an 18-block area located west of Soho and south of South Village, more suitable for residential and mixed-use development. Curbed reported that preservationists advocated for landmark designation for South Village to prevent any large-scale development from spilling over into the neighborhood, but a historic district was absent from the zoning amendments. Developer Trinity Real Estate, which owns 40 percent of Hudson Square’s property, initially proposed the rezoning and has committed to making neighborhood improvements.

Cuomo’s Buyback Program Could Reshape Coastline.  Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in New York (Courtesy of David Sundberg) New York’s Governor Cuomo is moving ahead with the buyout program he first introduced in his State of the State speech last month. The New York Times reported that Cuomo is proposing an ambitious plan to spend $400 million to purchase homes damaged by Hurricane Sandy, and clear the land for wetlands, dunes, and parkland that will “help protect coastal communities from ferocious storms” in the future. The buyout offer will also extend to homeowners who live in vulnerable areas at risk of flooding, but that were not affected by Sandy. Cuomo intends on paying for the program with part of the $51 Billion Emergency aid package passed by Congress, and then will look to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the remaining funding. In the meantime, Cuomo and his aids are waiting on the approval of federal officials. More details about the plan are expected in the next two weeks. (Photo: David Sundberg/ESTO)

 

On View> Contemporary Cartographies Asks Artists to Reimagine Maps in New Forms

East
Monday, February 4, 2013
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(Courtesy Lehman College)

Kevin Van Aelst’s Apple Globe. (Courtesy Lehman College)

Contemporary Cartographies
Lehman College Art Gallery
250 Bedford Park Blvd., Bronx, NY
Through May 11

Lehman College’s Contemporary Cartographies exhibition, curated by Susan Hoeltzel and Yuneikys Villalonga, showcases a group of contemporary artists working with and displaying maps in a variety of mediums and forms. Some artists have adapted existing maps to create new objects or displays while others have created either traditional or abstract maps out of unique materials. The maps in this exhibition may describe or expand on geographic forms or accepted boarders, while others narrate imagined or conceptual landscapes.

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A Look at Grand Central Past and Present

East, Newsletter
Friday, February 1, 2013
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Inside Grand Central Terminal. (Courtesy The Library of Congress)

Inside Grand Central Terminal. (Courtesy The Library of Congress)

As New Yorkers celebrate Grand Central’s Centennial, many might have forgotten, or perhaps never even knew, that the train terminal almost suffered the same fate as Penn Station and was nearly demolished in the late 1960s. This controversy made historic preservation a critical part of the conversation about development and the future of New York City.

Grand Central “was a gift to preservation and left a legacy. By its influence, it will save other buildings in the future,” said Frank Prial, Associate Partner at Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, the firm responsible for the restoration of Grand Central. “It is our poster child for preservation.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Video> Water Main Break Floods Manhattan’s Subway System

East
Friday, February 1, 2013
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A water main break at Madison Square Park. (Courtesy Jamie Hodin / @jamiehodin)

A water main break at Madison Square Park. (Courtesy Jamie Hodin / @jamiehodin)

Earlier today, a 36-inch water main burst in Manhattan, sending water skyward into 23rd Street  and Broadway at Madison Square Park. The 98-year pipe flooded the intersection with several inches of water, enough to breach the subway vents to the N, Q, and R line trains, sending a waterfall into the station and shutting down service. According to CBS New York, a total of three feet of water made it into the station. The MTA released a video showing the dramatic waterfall, a chilling reminder just how fragile New York’s vital infrastructure can be and making us wish that a few more of those designer-subway-grates by the like of Rogers Marvel and others were installed throughout the city.

Watch a video of the subway flooding after the jump.

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Happy 100th, Grand Central! Festivities Mark Centennial of Manhattan Landmark

East
Friday, February 1, 2013
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A LEGO model of Grand Central Terminal built for the station's 100th birthday. (Courtesy Kevin Ortiz / @MTA_NYCT_Vocero)

A LEGO model of Grand Central Terminal built for the station’s 100th birthday. (Courtesy Kevin Ortiz / @MTA_NYCT_Vocero)

Happy Birthday Grand Central Terminal! Today the 49-acre train station is turning 100 and celebrating this grand ‘ole affair with performances, events, and even a LEGO model of the Beaux-Arts style station itself, courtesy the LEGOLAND Discovery Center Westchester Station Master’s Office. Designed by Reed & Stern and Warren & Wetmore, the station is believed to be the largest station by number (44) of platforms in the world.

In honor of the Centennial, some of the retail shops and restaurants are even dropping their prices to 1913 levels, so commuters can grab a piece of cheesecake at the Oyster Bar for 19 cents. The New York Times also fired up its own time machine, posting the original supplement from 1913 when Grand Central first opened to the public. (You can download the PDF here.)

View a couple historic photos after the jump.

CANstruction 2013 New York Kicks Off at the World Financial Center

East
Friday, February 1, 2013
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Ted Moudis Associates' "Target Hunger" (Courtesy of Nicole Anderson/AN)

Ted Moudis Associates’ “Target Hunger” (Courtesy of Nicole Anderson/AN)

Starting last night at the Lower Manhattan’s Brookfield Place World Financial Center, 24 teams of architects, engineers, and MTA employees stacked cans into the small hours of the morning for the 20th Annual NYC CANstruction Competition. Large amorphous structures—some abstract, others more recognizable—emerged out of more than 80,000 cans of food.

The firms were given 24-hours to build their sculptures, which will then go on display for 11 days at the World Financial Center, and later dismantled and donated to City Harvest to provide food for the hungry. Last year, the competition yielded 90,000 cans of food, and Lisa Sposato, Associate Director of Food Sourcing Donor Relations at City Harvest, said they’ve already received 35,000 pounds of cans. Unfortunately Hurricane Sandy delayed the competition, and a few teams had to drop out, but several of them donated their cans of food.

Continue reading after the jump.

The New In Crowd: Architectural League’s 2013 Emerging Voices Announced

East, International
Friday, February 1, 2013
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(Luis Garcia)

Reflecting the various currents of contemporary architecture and urbanism, the Architectural League of New York has announced its line-up for the 2013 Emerging Voices lecture series. The series showcases notable talent from across North America and is selected through a portfolio competition that emphasizes built work. The program has had a remarkable track record at identifying important architects. Past Emerging Voices have included Steven Holl, Morphosis, Jeanne Gang, and SHoP among many other boldface archinames.

Check out all the winners after the jump.

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