Young Love in Times Square

Art, Design, East, Unveiled
Monday, January 6, 2014
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Archpaper01-TSquareheart

A rendering of the folly to be installed in February (Courtesy Times Square Alliance)

Brooklyn-based Young Projects have been announced as the winner of the annual competition to design a Valentine’s Day themed installation in Times Square. Times Square Arts, the wing of the Times Square Alliance responsible for public art programs, worked with the Van Alen Institute to select this year’s design, which will go on display in early February.

Continue reading after the jump.

Penn State Students Present Visions for Pittsburgh Neighborhood

(Courtesy Jessica Lock)

(Courtesy Jessica Lock)

Fourth and fifth-year landscape architecture students at Penn State’s College of Art and Architecture recently presented their proposals for reshaping a Pittsburgh neighborhood. The twelve participants in the school’s Pittsburgh Studio spent most of the semester focusing on Hazelwood, a neighborhood set to host a new site for a historic branch of the city’s Carnegie Library.

Read more after the jump

Review> The Philadelphia Museum of Art Explores the Art & Architecture of Fernand Léger

Art, East, Review
Wednesday, December 18, 2013
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(Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Fernand Léger’s “The City,” 1919. (Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Fernand Léger is famous for his colorful paintings, many of which feature machine-like forms. He was also at the center of Paris’ avant-garde in the 1920s, not only in painting, but also in graphics, set and costume design, film-making, and architecture.

That is the thesis of Anna Vallye, curator of this fall’s major exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Léger: Modern Art and the Metropolis, inspired by the museum’s Léger masterpiece, the monumental 1919 painting, “The City.”

Continue reading after the jump.

First Mods of World’s Largest Prefabricated Building Assembled in Brooklyn

Architecture, East, Technology
Monday, December 16, 2013
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First modular component of B2 tower hoisted up (Courtesy of DKC Public Relations, Marketing & Government Affairs)

First modular component of B2 tower hoisted up (Courtesy of DKC Public Relations)

Last Thursday, the first mods of the SHoP Architects’ prefabricated skyscraper—the B2 tower at Brooklyn’s megaproject, Atlantic Yards—were hoisted up and assembled into place. The 32-story residential tower, which will be half affordable housing, will rise within the Atlantic Yards development adjacent the Barclays Center. The modular components are being built locally in a 100,000 square foot facility in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. When construction is complete by end of 2014, it will be the world’s tallest pre-fabricated building.

Changes Ahead for North Brooklyn: Two Massive Projects Move Forward

Architecture, Development, East
Monday, December 16, 2013
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SHoP-designed proposal for Domino Sugar Refinery (COURTESY SHOP ARCHITECTS AND JAMES CORNER FIELD OPERATIONS)

SHoP-designed proposal for Domino Sugar Refinery (COURTESY SHOP ARCHITECTS AND JAMES CORNER FIELD OPERATIONS)

Last week was a big week for development in the already condo-saturated area of north Brooklyn. Brownstoner reported that City Council gave the massive Greenpoint Landing proposal the green light to construct 10 towers along the East River waterfront. While the project already had the approval to build as of right, the developers made a few concessions including an agreement to build a public school, offer free shuttle service to transit nodes from the complex, bump up the number of affordable housing units, and allocate money towards Newton Barge Park.

In Williamsburg, the SHoP-designed Domino Sugar Refinery proposal (pictured) received Community Board One’s approval. Two Trees also had as of right to build its string of towers, but the developer is now seeking to increase the height of the buildings and add more green space. Board members requested a few tweaks to affordable housing options and retail.

MAS NYC Seeks Nominations for 2013 Brendan Gill Prize.  MAS NYC Seeks Nominations for 2013 Brendan Gill Prize The Municipal Art Society (MAS) is accepting nominations for the 2013 Brendan Gill Prize. Each year the MAS presents the honor, which carries a cash prize, to a creator of a work of art from the past deemed to embody the spirit and energy of New York City. Former MAS chairman Gill spent more than 60 years as a critic of architecture and theater for the New Yorker and the prize was established in his honor in 1987. Past winners within the field of architecture include Louis Kahn and Michael Van Valkenburgh (pictured).  MAS will be accepting nominations until January 6, 2014. (Photo: Courtesy MAS)

 

Payette Designs a Curvy Research Building, Parks for Boston’s Northeastern University

Architecture, East, News, Newsletter, Unveiled
Thursday, December 12, 2013
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Northeastern University's new Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Building (Courtesy of Payette and Northeastern)

Northeastern University’s new Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Building. (Courtesy Payette and Northeastern)

Boston is well known for both its thriving biotech industry and for its high concentration of universities, and now the city’s two largest economic sectors are overlapping with several academic institutions shrewdly expanding their science departments. Northeastern University is one of several schools to hop on this bandwagon. The school just announced that it will build a 180,000-square-foot academic facility, called the Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Building (ISEB). Boston-based firm Payette won the commission to design the six-story building along with adjoining green spaces after participating in a six week design competition.

Continue reading after the jump.

Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation Appoints James Hanley Director

East, Shft+Alt+Del
Wednesday, December 11, 2013
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James Hanley. (Courtesy BWAF)

James Hanley. (Courtesy BWAF)

The Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation (BWAF), a non-profit dedicated to “changing the culture of the building industry, for women, through education and research,” just announced that after a national search it has chosen a new executive director: James T. Hanley, formerly the senior associate director of development at Barnard College. Hanley has undergraduate and advanced degrees in architecture along with an MBA and an MA in Art History and claims he will use his “skills in program development and financial management to broaden the role of the organization throughout the United States.”

Beverly Willis, the founder of BWAF, said that Hanley is “keenly aware of the issues encountered by women in the design industry” which will “enable BWAF to build on its prior successes and help women achieve their professional and personal goals through our programs and outreach.”

Under Hanley’s leadership, the organization is launching a number of new initiatives in 2014. These include the exploration of a program for women as emerging leaders and the impact of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) as factors in success. Another new initiative is “Built by Women: New York City,” a focused collection within the Foundation’s Dynamic National Archive (DNA), which BWAF plans to use as a pilot for similar projects for cities around the country. Finally In 2014, it will complete its project entitled “Women of 20th-Century American Architecture,” to highlight the contributions of 50 outstanding women who significantly shaped the built environment in America.

Baltimore’s Hopscotch Crosswalk Colossus

City Terrain, East, Urbanism
Wednesday, December 11, 2013
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BALTIMORE'S HOPSCOTCH CROSSWALK (COURTESY GRAHAM CORELL-ALLEN/ VIA FLICKR)

BALTIMORE’S HOPSCOTCH CROSSWALK (COURTESY GRAHAM CORELL-ALLEN/ VIA FLICKR)

Crossing the street in Baltimore just got a lot more fun. The city has just unveiled its newest dispatch: a “hopscotch crosswalk” transforming the downtown street crossing at the corner of Eutaw and Lombard streets into an entertaining diversion for pedestrians. The project was a component of the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts for the Bromo Seltzer Arts & Entertainment District’s desire in incorporate public art in various areas of the city.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels Reportedly Designing Major Apartment Building in Harlem.  Bjarke Ingels Reportedly Designing Major Apartment Building in Harlem Something BIG is coming to Harlem. According to the New York Post, Long Island–based Blumenfeld Development has hired the Bjarke Ingels Group to design a proposed residential project on East 125th street. The Danish and American architects have reportedly signed on to build a 200,000 square-foot apartment building on a site between Lexington and Third avenues, known as Gotham Plaza, which currently contains a decade-old DMV building. While renderings have yet to be unleashed, judging from Bjarke’s incoming West 57 project, we can surely expect something exciting from the 200-unit apartment building, 20 percent of which will be affordable.

 

Could de Blasio Choose Anna Levin as NYC’s Next City Planner?  Could de Blasio Choose Anna Levin as NYC's Next City Planner? After a campaign insisting differentiation from his predecessor, New York City Mayor–elect Bill de Blasio (above) is not likely to choose a Bloomberg-elected official as his Chief of the Department of City Planning. The Real Deal reported that three current members of the City’s Planning Commission—Anna Levin, Michelle de la Uz, and Kenneth Knuckles—are speculated as replacements for current commissioner Amanda Burden. Levin, elected by Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, is a front-runner. Her previous experiences as a commissioner and Community Board 4 Member give her grassroots appeal backed by political savvy. (Photo: Courtesy NYC Public Advocate)

 

Organization Rescues Cape Cod Modernist Homes

East
Monday, December 9, 2013
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Designed by prolific local architect Charles Zehnder, the Kugel Gips house was built on Cape Cod in 1970 (Courtesy CCMT)

Designed by prolific local architect Charles Zehnder, the Kugel Gips house was built on Cape Cod in 1970 (Courtesy CCMT)(Courtesy CCMT)

Built in 1970 by prolific Cape Cod–based architect Charles Zehnder, the Frank Lloyd Wright–inspired Kugel Gips house spent nearly a decade unoccupied and in disrepair while under ownership of the National Park Service (NPS). Abandoned and rotting, the compact Modernist home was nearly lost to the idyllic peninsula’s salty winds, and worse yet, the wrecking ball, until Wellfleet, Massachusetts–based architect Peter McMahon and the Cape Cod Modernist Trust (CCMT) stepped in.

Continue reading after the jump.

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