New York City’s Vision Zero Arrives on Atlantic Avenue with “Arterial Slow Zones”

DOT Commissioner Trottenberg Announces Atlantic Avenue "Slow Zone." (Flickr / NYC DOT)

DOT Commissioner Trottenberg Announces Atlantic Avenue “Slow Zone.” (Flickr / NYC DOT)

Vision Zero is coming to Brooklyn and Queens‘ Atlantic Avenue. Nearly eight miles of the notoriously dangerous thoroughfare will be transformed into the first of 25 planned “arterial slow zones.” Last Wednesday—at the busy corner of Atlantic and Washington avenues—Department of Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg announced that the city is taking immediate steps to save lives by reducing the street’s speed limit from 30MPH to 25.

More after the jump.

Review> If/Then, the Musical, Follows the Life of an Urban Planner

Art, East, On View, Review
Monday, April 14, 2014
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Idina Menzel and the cast of If/Then. (Joan Marcus)

Idina Menzel and the cast of If/Then. (Joan Marcus)

If/Then
Richard Rogers Theater
226 West 46th Street, New York
Scheduled to play through October 12, 2014

THINK OF EACH PLAZA, PIER, AND PUBLIC PARK—
HOW MANY SIT THERE EMPTY, LONELY, DARK—

The Broadway musical If/Then starts in Madison Square Park with its unmistakable folding seats, tables, and umbrellas, a signature of Janette Sadik-Khan’s overhauling of public spaces during the Bloomberg administration. In this musical by Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey (the team behind Next to Normal) city planner Elizabeth (Idina Menzel) returns to New York from Arizona where she’s just gotten out of a failed marriage—and urban sprawl.

Continue reading after the jump.

Richard Meier In For the Long Haul In Newark

Architecture, East
Monday, April 14, 2014
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The SoMa master plan. (Courtesy Richard Meier & Partners)

The SoMa master plan. (Courtesy Richard Meier & Partners)

As construction continues at Richard Meier’s Teachers Village in Newark, renderings have surfaced for a significant batch of glassy towers that could rise alongside it. At first glance, the master plan looks like Hudson Yards‘ glossy, younger sibling who is vying for attention on the other side of the Hudson. But the project remains as ephemeral as its glassy renderings.

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Justin Davidson Warns of Looming Shadows at St. John the Divine Development.  Rendering for the site. (Courtesy DNA Info / Emily Frost) New York Magazine’s Justin Davidson has called on Mayor De Blasio to protect the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine from being overshadowed by new apartment towers (massing diagram pictured). The site adjacent to the Cathedral has been cleared and construction seems imminent, but Davidson believes the mayor can get involved to stop the current Handel-designed plans. Instead of two towers, Davidson proposes one taller and more slender tower that’s sited farther from the street, more affordable units, and landmark status for the rest of the property. (Image: Courtesy DNA Info / Emily Frost)

 

Rebuild By Design> BIG’s “BIG U” for Lower Manhattan

The "Big U" wraps around Battery Park. (Courtesy BIG)

The “Big U” wraps around Battery Park. (Courtesy BIG)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s BIG’s “Big U” that could save Lower Manhattan from the next superstorm.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> OMA’s Plans to Protect Coastal New Jersey

Aerial rendering of OMA's plan. (Courtesy OMA)

Aerial rendering of OMA’s plan. (Courtesy OMA)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s OMA‘s plan to protect The Garden State’s coast.

See the plan after the jump.

Updating Washington, D.C.’s Mies van der Rohe Library

The Great Hall. (Courtesy Martinez and Johnson + Mecanoo)

The Great Hall. (Courtesy Martinez and Johnson + Mecanoo)

Earlier this year, the Washington, D.C. Public Library announced that Martinez+Johnson and Mecanoo had won their competition to design  the next phase of the city’s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library.  Check out AN‘s coverage of the winning design here. The firm beat out two other finalists to revamp van der Rohe‘s iconic work. Here’s AN’s guide to the competition and the runners-up.

More after the jump.

Facade Design in the Digital Age: Knowing the Tools is Half the Battle

East, Technology
Friday, April 11, 2014
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facades+PERFORMANCE tech workshops offer hands-on instruction in digital design. (Courtesy Mode Lab)

As most AEC professionals know, technology can be either a help or a hindrance when it comes to the design of high-performance building envelopes. Software programs like Grasshopper and Autodesk Vasari offer powerful tools for generating, modeling, and analyzing facades. But there’s a catch. Without a firm grasp of the programs’ capabilities, users can lose data, overlook important features, or otherwise negate the advantages inherent to digital design. Read More

Rebuild By Design> Waggonner and Ball, unabridged Architecture’s Plan For Bridgeport, CT

The plan for Bridgeport, Connecticut. (Courtesy Waggoner and Ball, unabridged Architecture, Yale, and Arcadis)

The plan for Bridgeport, Connecticut. (Courtesy Waggoner and Ball, unabridged Architecture, Yale, and Arcadis)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s how Waggonner and Ball, unabridged and Yale ARCADIS’ team plans to create a more resilient Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Read More

Review> 2014 Armory Art Week Improved With the Help of Architecture

Art, East, Review
Thursday, April 10, 2014
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Sheila Hicks, Pillar of Inquiry/Supple Column, 2013-14, left, (Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co) and Zoe Leonard, Sketch for 945 Madison Avenue, 2014, right. (Courtesy Zoe Leonard)

Sheila Hicks, Pillar of Inquiry/Supple Column, 2013-14, left, (Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co) and Zoe Leonard, Sketch for 945 Madison Avenue, 2014, right. (Courtesy Zoe Leonard)

With the plethora of contemporary art on view in New York during Armory Arts week, it has been instructive to note the contribution by architects to the design of these temporary exhibition spaces, and the use of interesting architectural spaces. The fairs are often held in structures originally used for other purposes — piers, parking facilities, drill halls — so the task has been to not only carve out space for display, but to move viewers (and buyers) with flexibility and ease and to provide an enticing environment. Fair organizers have turned to young architects for these interior layouts, or have chosen compelling venues.

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Yeezus! What a Jury! The Living and The Dead at MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program

Design, East, Eavesdroplet
Thursday, April 10, 2014
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The Living's pavilion, Hy-Fi. (Courtesy The Living)

The Living’s pavilion, Hy-Fi. (Courtesy The Living)

The MoMA PS 1 jury process that selected the “100 percent organic pavilion Hy-Fi” for its 2014 pavilion may have been a contentious group. The museum announced last month that David Benjamin, the principal of Brooklyn-based firm The Living, would design the temporary structure. But several sources have told Eavesdrop that one of the short listed firms (Collective-LOK, PARA-Project, WOJR, over,under, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, LAMAS, Pita + Bloom) was in fact told that it—not Benjamin—had won the design competition.

The story unfolds after the jump…

Rebuild By Design> HR&A’s Commercial Corridor Resiliency Project

Resiliency in Red Hook. (Courtesy HR&A/Cooper Robertson)

Resiliency in Red Hook. (Courtesy HR&A/Cooper Robertson)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s how the team led by HR&A/Cooper Robertson plans to bring resiliency to the East Coast from the Rockaways to Red Hook.

COntinue reading after the jump.

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