Scott Stringer to Give Harlem’s Historic Fire Watchtower an Expensive Makeover

East
Tuesday, September 3, 2013
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The Harlem Fire Watchtower (Courtesy Paul Lowry)

The Harlem Fire Watchtower is in an extremely dilapidated state. (Courtesy Paul Lowry)

Earlier this week, Manhattan Borough President and City Controller candidate Scott Stringer announced his $1 million pledge to restore a historic Harlem fire watchtower at the heart of Marcus Garvey Park. In the 19th century, the 47-foot tower served as a lookout point and the bell was raised in case of imminent danger. Today, the tower no longer protects the community but threatens it, showing substantial signs of decay and neglect.

Running a tight race against Eliot Spitzer, Stringer lags behind the former governor in terms of African American votes and is thus seeking to salvage one of the community’s most valued landmarks. The past few days, he has generated good publicity from his ability and desire to fund this restoration project.The $1 million provided by Stringer, along with the $1.75 million contributed by Councilmember Inez Dickens and $1.25 million by Mayor Bloomberg will be used to preserve the tower. The project includes a full restoration of the tower’s cast-iron structure, the removal of deficient parts, and the additional construction of a stainless steel support system.

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Le Corbusier’s Carpenter Center for Visual Arts: Fifty Years Later

East
Friday, August 30, 2013
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Folium

Building Facade (Photo Courtesy of Folium from Flickr)

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the construction of the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts. Completed in 1963, it is Le Corbusier’s only major building in the United States, and one of his final commissions before his death in 1965. The renowned modernist architect envisaged a “synthesis of the arts,” the union of architecture with sculpture, painting, and other arts. In the spirit of Corbusier’s unique style, the building stands out among the more traditional architectural prototypes of the Harvard campus. This is evident right from his initial concept sketch of the building, where Corbusier utilized bold colors to denote the new building, while shading the surrounding Harvard campus in dark brown—a color not typically part of his visual palette.

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Dlandstudio’s Gowanus Canal Sponge Park to be Constucted in Next Year

City Terrain, East
Wednesday, August 28, 2013
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The Gowanus Canal Sponge Park (Courtesy of dlandstudio)

The Gowanus Canal Canal Sponge Park (Courtesy dlandstudio)

It has been several years in the making, but now the industrial strip along Brooklyn’s polluted Gowanus Canal will finally be transformed into a lush and porous green space aptly named The Gowanus Canal Sponge Park that will soak up and filter rainwater to help improve the overall water quality along the waterway. This $1.5 million project, a collaboration between the Gowanus Canal Conservancy and landscape architecture firm dlandstudio, will finally get off the ground with the help of city, state, and federal funding.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Metropolitan Museum Presents “Ken Price: A Retrospective” Through September 22

East, Newsletter
Friday, August 23, 2013
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Pastel (1995)

Ken Price’s colorful, sensual ceramic sculptures have always posed the question as to whether they are art or craft. But the blur may also include the architectonic. His signature forms—cups and eggs—set up a tension between exterior and interior. New York Times art critic Roberta Smith has written: “Their forms oscillated between the biomorphic and the geometric, the geological and the architectural.”

Price’s friend, Frank Gehry, designed the installation of the exhibition, Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective, currently on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through September 22. He lives with Price’s ceramics, his first purchase being a cup festooned with snails. Gehry wrote of Price’s work, “They were like buildings.” He cited a cup with a twisted piece at the top, and sees the similarity to his California Aerospace Museum, 1982-84, featuring an airplane jutting out of the structure. “I think the similarity of form was totally unconscious. Now I think a lot of architects must have been looking at those cups…the relationships are amazing.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Ratner Ready to Sell Majority of Brooklyn’s Atlantic Yards to an Investor

East
Friday, August 23, 2013
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Dashed line indicates the site boundaries of Atlantic Yards. (Courtesy Forest City)

Dashed line indicates the site boundaries of Atlantic Yards. (Courtesy Forest City)

It has been a bumpy road for Brooklyn’s controversial Atlantic Yards development. The ten-year project-in-the-making is in the news yet again. According to the New York Times, 50 to 80 percent of Atlantic Yards is now up for grabs. Developer Bruce C. Ratner, chairman of Forest City Ratner Companies is on the hunt for an investor to buy the lion’s share of the development for a hefty sum of up to $800 million. Forest City would still hold the reigns over the future development of the project.

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Graffiti Mecca in Queens to be Replaced by Residential Towers

East
Thursday, August 22, 2013
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5 Pointz (Courtesy of 5 Pointz NYC)

5 Pointz (Courtesy of 5 Pointz NYC)

The former record needle and clothing manufacturing building, 5 Pointz, in Long Island City, Queens, is one of the few remaining refuges for graffiti art in New York City. For the last two decades, aerosol artists have flocked to this 200,000-square-foot warehouse to exhibit their work. But now the graffiti art mecca is one step closer to being demolished and replaced by two 47 and 41 story residential towers. In spite of Queens Community Board 2′s opposition to the plan, the City Planning Commission voted unanimously to approve a special permit that would allow developer G&M Realty to build a larger structure than permitted by the existing zoning. DNAinfo reported that Queens Borough President Helen Marshall also came out in favor of the plan with the stipulation that the development include 75 affordable housing units and studio space for artists.

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Zoning Change will Open Door for Sprawling Residential Development in Queens

City Terrain, East
Thursday, August 22, 2013
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Hallets Point Development (Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations)

Hallets Point Development (Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations)

Astoria may soon rival its neighbor, Long Island City, as the next major residential waterfront community in Queens. In a unanimous vote, the City Planning Commission has given developer Lincoln Equities Group the green light to move forward with a $1 billion residential housing development on Hallets Point peninsula.

DNAinfo reported that the project would include 2,161 market-rate and 483 affordable apartments as well as a public esplanade along the East River, retail, supermarket, and possibly a public school in NYCHA‘s adjacent Astoria Houses campus.

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Charlotte Prepares To Open Romare Bearden Park On Labor Day Weekend

City Terrain, East
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
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Romare Bearden Park from Corner of Mint Street and MLK Jr. Boulevard. (Courtesy LandDesign).

Rendered View of Romare Bearden Park from Corner of Mint Street and MLK Jr. Boulevard. (Courtesy LandDesign)

In the business-oriented district of Uptown Charlotte, North Carolina, LandDesign landscape architects and Seattle-based artist, Norie Sato, have collaborated on the design of a new 5.4-acre park inspired by the life and work of native artist, Romare Bearden. The Charlotte Observer reported that the public space located in Third Ward will serve as a venue for concerts and cultural events in effort to revitalize the area’s currently dull after-work scene. Scheduled for a grand three-day opening this upcoming Labor Day weekend, Romare Bearden Park includes open greens, gardens, courtyards, a play area, and water features within its conceptual inspiration.

Continue reading after the jump.

Coffee + Giacometti: MoMA Sculpture Garden Offering Free Morning Access

East
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
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The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden at MoMA. (Martin Seck)

The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden at MoMA. (Martin Seck)

MoMA’s renowned Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden will be open and free to the public from 9:00 to 10:15 am, beginning September 9. Designed by Philip Johnson—and preserved during the recent Yoshio Taniguchi expansion—the sculpture garden is one of the great modern landscapes in the U.S., and currently features sculpture by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Alberto Giacometti, Tony Smith, and others. With coffee and beverages available for purchase, the garden is sure to become a destination for quick business meetings and quiet moments of cultural immersion amid the hubbub of Midtown mornings.

Developer of Chelsea Market to Buy Massive Industry City Complex in Brooklyn

East
Tuesday, August 20, 2013
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Industry City (Courtesy of Bush Terminal/Industry City)

Industry City (Courtesy of Bush Terminal/Industry City)

In recent years, Brooklyn’s waterfront has morphed into a breeding ground for start-ups, tech agencies, and boutique manufacturing. Now the massive Industry City complex in Sunset Park could emerge as the next creative hub in the borough joining other booming neighborhoods to the north such as DUMBO, the Navy Yard, and Williamsburg. Crain’s reported that Jamestown Properties, a real estate management and investment company, which owns Chelsea Market and the Milk Studios Building in Manhattan, is teaming up with Angelo Gordon and Belvedere Capital to purchase the sprawling 6.5 million-square-foot Industry City site.

Continue reading after the jump.

Urban Planner Named New President of the Brooklyn Navy Yard

East, Shft+Alt+Del
Tuesday, August 20, 2013
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Aerial view of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Courtesy Brooklyn Navy Yard)

Aerial view of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Courtesy Brooklyn Navy Yard)

David Ehrenberg has been appointed president and CEO of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, a 300-acre, former ship-building base turned city-owned industrial park. Ehrenberg is currently an executive vice president at the New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC). Over the last decade the Navy Yard has emerged as an essential zone for preserving and growing New York’s manufacturing sector, especially small businesses. The Yard currently includes 4.5 million square feet of leasable space, with an occupancy rate of 99 percent.

Continue reading after the jump.

HUD Secretary Announces a Comprehensive Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Strategy

City Terrain, East
Tuesday, August 20, 2013
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HUD Secretary Donovan and Mayor Bloomberg announce Hurricane Sandy rebuilding strategy. (Nicole Anderson / AN)

HUD Secretary Donovan (right) and Mayor Bloomberg (left) announce Hurricane Sandy rebuilding strategy. (Nicole Anderson / AN)

On the roof of a construction site in Greenpoint, Brooklyn Monday, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan announced the release of a new report outlining 69 rebuilding strategies designed to both help Hurricane Sandy–ravaged communities and to serve as a model for coastal regions across the country that are vulnerable to storm surges and rising sea levels. Close to the waterfront, the site overlooked the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant—one of the few sewage treatment facilities to survive Sandy intact. It was a fitting place for Secretary Donovan, who also serves as chair of the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, to introduce this bundle of new recommendations that address both immediate and long-term needs of coastal communities, including resilient and region-wide approaches to rebuilding and infrastructure investment. A number of the initiatives in the report, such as HUD’s “Rebuild by Design” competition, are already underway.

Continue reading after the jump.

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