Little BIG Maze: Bjarke Ingels Group Designs Labyrinth for National Building Museum

Design, East, On View
Wednesday, April 2, 2014
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(Courtesy BIG / National Building Museum)

(Courtesy BIG / National Building Museum)

The National Building Museum was smart to wait till April 2nd to announce their latest project, lest anyone think it was a cleverly crafted April Fool’s prank. The Washington, D.C.–based institution said today over Twitter (“A-MAZE-ING NEWS”) that Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) will design an unconventional maze to be temporarily housed in its grand atrium. Perhaps inspired by the summer tradition of the corn maze, the BIG installation will debut in the West Court of the building’s cavernous Great Hall on July 4th, bringing new meaning to Independence Day to those wandering within its walls.

More after the jump.

House in Cambridge by Armando and di Robilant

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Armando and di Robilant updated an historic Cambridge home with a layered facade and oversize windows. (Paolo Rosselli)

Armando and di Robilant updated an historic Cambridge home with a layered facade and oversize windows. (Paolo Rosselli)

A translucent polycarbonate skin transforms an early-19th century Massachusetts home.

On a well-traveled street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, about halfway between Harvard University and MIT, sits a house not like its neighbors. Its simple massing and pitched roof indicate old bones. But its skin is all 21st century. The house, recently renovated by Alessandro Armando and Manfredo di Robilant, is clad in translucent polycarbonate panels that reveal the structural and insulating layers beneath. For the architects, the project was an experiment in applying a cladding system designed for large-scale projects to a single-family home. “We thought this could be a possible test-bed for something more standard, something that could at least be thought of as a standard way of renovating and improving a typical American detached house,” said di Robilant. “This house is very small, but we’re now trying to fit it toward possible standardization of this approach.” Read More

Grocery Store Tycoon John Catsimatidis Wants to Save Philip Johnson’s New York State Pavilion

Development, East, Preservation
Monday, March 31, 2014
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John Catsimatidis wants to save the NY State Pavilion. ( David Tan / Flickr)

John Catsimatidis wants to save the NY State Pavilion. ( David Tan / Flickr)

John Catsimatidis, the billionaire-grocery-store-tycoon-turned-failed-mayoral-candidate said he will write a check to save Philip Johnson’s iconic New York State Pavilion in Queens, New York. That is, if someone presents him with the right “visionary” plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New York City’s Population Reaches All-Time High

East
Monday, March 31, 2014
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New York City Crowds ( Victor Villanueva / Flickr)

New York City Crowds ( Victor Villanueva / Flickr)

New York City is more jam-packed than ever. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city’s population is 8,405,837, which is up more than 230,000 from 2010. The Bureau reports, “the increase is fueled by people continuing to move to the city, a decline in the number of people leaving the city, as well as the continued surplus of births over deaths due to life expectancy in the city reaching new record highs.” Every borough experienced population growth, but none as significantly as—duh—Brooklyn.

On View> Doug Wheeler’s Light Installation Shines at David Zwirner Gallery Through April 5

Art, East, Lighting, Newsletter, On View
Monday, March 31, 2014
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(Courtesy David Zwirner Gallery)

(Courtesy David Zwirner Gallery)

Doug Wheeler
David Zwirner Gallery
537 West 20th Street, New York
Entry limited to 6 people at a time
Reservations to view the exhibition are available, 212-517-8677
Through April 5, 2014

When you enter the immersive Doug Wheeler installation at David Zwirner Gallery, it’s like daybreak. A domed space with a flat apex meets the horizon with a hidden line of LEDs that shed light in a gradual, two-minute cycle in what the artist calls a “rotational horizon work.” The effect is like looking into a clear blue sky, that on closer inspection has subtle gradations that change as the earth revolves. The floor is the same color and is coped so you are slightly off balance as you advance and retreat towards this unreachable horizon.

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Frank Gehry’s World Trade Center Performing Arts Center Facing Many, Many Challenges

Architecture, Development, East
Friday, March 28, 2014
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Gehry's Plan for the Performing Arts Center. (Courtesy Gehry Parners)

Gehry’s Plan for the Performing Arts Center. (Courtesy Gehry Parners)

As the key elements of the World Trade Center site inch closer to completion, it looks like the Frank Gehry–designed Performing Arts Center might be left behind. The Wall Street Journal reports that the Center faces incredibly daunting logistical and financial roadblocks that could doom the project entirely. So, where to start? With the money, of course.

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De Blasio Appoints “Tenant-Friendly” Members to New York City’s Rent Guidelines Board

Development, East
Friday, March 28, 2014
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New York City Apartments (MagnuMicah / Flickr)

New York City Apartments (MagnuMicah / Flickr)

Some much-needed rent relief could be in store for over one million New Yorkers. The New York Observer reports that Mayor Bill de Blasio has appointed five “tenant-friendly” members to the city’s Rent Guidelines Board, which oversees rent increases for rent-stabilized units. During the mayoral campaign, then-candidate de Blasio was quite critical of the Board. At the time, he called for a rent freeze on some units and slammed their decision to allow 4 percent increases on one-year leases. As with most of his appointments thus far, de Blasio is signaling a clear break from his predecessor, Michael Bloomberg. A spokesperson for the de Blasio Administration told The Observer “we plan to undertake an ambitious agenda that confronts the affordability crisis facing the city’s tenants.”

On View> Princeton Art Museum presents “Edvard Munch: Symbolism in Print”

Art, East, On View
Friday, March 28, 2014
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(Courtesy Princeton University Art Museum)

(Courtesy Princeton University Art Museum)

Edvard Munch: Symbolism in Print
Princeton University Art Museum
McCormick Hall, Princeton, NJ
Through June 8

Edvard Munch is best known for his 1893 painting The Scream. Like the majority of his work, this piece deals with psychological themes that were mainstays of late nineteenth century symbolist art, which greatly influenced German Expressionism. The symbols that Munch used contain universal meanings, but also meanings specific to his life.

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Rizzoli Bookstore to Likely Lose Their Manhattan Home

Development, East, Preservation
Friday, March 28, 2014
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Rizzoli Bookstore. (Garrett Ziegler / Flickr)

Rizzoli Bookstore. (Garrett Ziegler / Flickr)

New York City will soon lose another one of its bookstores—at least temporarily. The Landmarks Preservation Commission has denied landmark status for 31 West 57th Street, the century old building that houses the truly iconic Rizolli Bookstore. This clears the way for the building’s owners to demolish the current structure and put up what is expected to be a commercial or residential tower— this is 57th Street, after all. The owners of the building are reportedly trying to find a new home for Rizolli.

 

As New York’s Bikeshare System’s Challenges Mount, Citi Bike’s General Manager Resigns

Citibikes like this one hit New York streets in May 2013. (Jesse Chan-Norris/Flickr)

Citi Bikes like this one hit New York streets in May 2013. (Jesse Chan-Norris/Flickr)

Citi Bike’s week of bad news just got worse. After reports that the program was short tens of millions of dollars, and plagued with technical  and maintenance problems, Citi Bike’s general manager, Justin Ginsburgh, has resigned. He is pedaling off to advise a construction firm. It’s not clear what’s next for the struggling, but popular program. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has said the city will not bail out the program, but it may allow Citi Bike to raise membership fees.

 

Miami Architects Add Visual Weight to City’s Major League Soccer Quest

East, Unveiled
Wednesday, March 26, 2014
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Miami_soccer_archpaper1

(Courtesy Arquitectonica)

A lack of a viable stadium had been seen as a key hole in Miami’s efforts to welcome a Major League Soccer franchise. Now local firm Arquitectonica has stepped in to fill that void, collaborating with 360 Architecture to design a potential waterfront soccer venue. The campaign has a rather dashing face in the form of soccer-star David Beckham, who has provided vocal and financial backing for the plan and apparently played active role in the design concept and siting of the proposed stadium.

More after the jump.

Elizabeth Duffy, Apartment 2B by Susan Morris

East, On View
Monday, March 24, 2014
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(Courtesy dm contemporary NYC)

(Courtesy dm contemporary NYC)

 

Elizabeth Duffy & Cheryl Yun: Apartment 2B
dm contemporary NYC
39 East 29th Street, 2nd Floor
New York
Ended March 15, 2014

On the 2nd floor of a luxury 34-story highrise between Madison & Park avenues designed by architect H. Thomas O’Hara is a gallery called dm contemporary NYC. Although the gallery is located in an apartment, it is usually a white-walled exhibition space without the trappings of a domicile, save for the kitchen island. Artists Elizabeth Duffy and Cheryl Yun decided to transform the space back into a domestic environment with a twist for her recent exhibition Apartment 2B.

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