Video> 48 Crazy Hours In the Life of a Citi Bike

Citi Bikes in Manhattan (SLGCKGC / Flickr)

Citi Bikes in Manhattan (SLGCKGC / Flickr)

While Citi Bike is publicly bleeding money and senior staff, the program continues to be extremely popular on the streets of New York. The blue bikes have woven themselves into the city’s urban fabric like yellow cabs, or halal carts, or rats eating shwarma that fell off a halal cart. New data released by Citi Bike shows that the bikes aren’t just being used by tourists pedaling from MoMA to the High Line—they are a viable transportation option for the city’s commuters.

Continue reading after the jump.

De Blasio Taps Queens Museum President for New York City’s Cultural Affairs Commissioner

Art, East, Shft+Alt+Del
Tuesday, April 8, 2014
.
Tom Finkelpearl at the Queens Museum. (Courtesy ioby.org)

Tom Finkelpearl at the Queens Museum. (Courtesy ioby.org)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has selected Tom Finkelpearl, the Queens Museum president and executive director, as the city’s next cultural affairs commissioner. De Blasio made the announcement at the museum, which recently underwent a significant renovation led by Grimshaw Architects.

Continue reading after the jump.

Construction Starts on Massive Mixed-Use Development On the D.C. Waterfront

Aerial Rendering of the Project. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

Aerial Rendering of the Project. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

After  nearly a decade of planning, a $2 billion, three-million-square-foot mixed-use development is underway on Washington D.C.’s Southwest waterfront. In March, construction started on Phase 1 of The Wharf, a project that is being developed by Hoffman-Madison Waterfront and designed by Perkins-Eastman. The new neighborhood will have marinas, green space, entertainment venues, and plenty of retail, residential, and hotel space.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> How Team Interboro Would Protect Nassau County’s South Shore

Interboro's Living by the Bay proposal. (Courtesy Interboro)

Interboro’s Living by the Bay proposal. (Courtesy Interboro)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s the plan proposed by Interboro Partners’ team.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> MIT’s Plan to Save New Jersey and Metropolitan New York

MIT's proposed site. (Courtesy MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism)

MIT’s proposed site. (Courtesy MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Hurricane Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, here is a closer look at each of the final ten proposals, beginning with the team led by MIT.

Continue reading after the jump.

On Second Try, Robert Stern’s Proposal for Philly’s American Revolution Museum Approved

Development, East, Newsletter
Monday, April 7, 2014
.
Stern's new plan for the museum. (Courtesy NC3D for Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Stern’s new plan for the museum. (Courtesy NC3D for Robert A.M. Stern Architects)

Weeks after the Philly Art Commission slammed Robert Stern’s proposal for the Museum for the American Revolution, he’s back with a new design. And good news for the starchitect—the commission likes it. They really, really like it. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that the new plan was unanimously approved and building permits should be issued in the next few months. Unsurprisingly, Stern‘s altered design does not include the features, which the Commission called “Disneyesque.”

See the old design after the jump.

Barclays Center’s Bald Spot to Get Green-Roof Toupee

The Barclays Center green roof. (Courtesy SHoP Architects)

The Barclays Center green roof. (Courtesy SHoP Architects)

Over one-hundred-thousand-square-feet of sedum will be implanted into the Barclays Center’s massive, logo-emblazoned, bald-spot of a roof. According to the Wall Street Journal, SHoP is designing the green topper for the one billion dollar arena. Plans for a public green space on top of the arena date back over a decade, but were later scrapped due to cost constraints.

Read More

Port Authority Wants New Tower and $400 Million Bus Terminal Annex in Manhattan

The Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Rose Trinh / Flickr)

The Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Rose Trinh / Flickr)

The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey has big plans for Manhattan’s West-side bus terminal. In an attempt to cut congestion on the hell-forsaken crowded streets of Hell’s Kitchen, the authority is planning a $400 million bus annex a few blocks from the main 42nd Street Bus Terminal. And to improve that hell-forsaken battered terminal, they are reportedly resurrecting plans to build a tower on top of it—the funds from which would be used to improve the facility.

Continue reading after the jump.

Holl’s Pricey New Library in Queens Must Tone it Down a Notch

Development, East, News, Newsletter
Friday, April 4, 2014
.
Rendering for Hunters Point Community Library. (Courtesy Steven Holl Architects)

Rendering for Hunters Point Community Library. (Courtesy Steven Holl Architects)

Looks like Steven Holl’s impressive design for a new library in Queens, New York costs quite a bit more than expected. DNA Info reported that bids for the 21,000-square-foot project came in about $10-20 million over budget. But that doesn’t mean the project is dead just yet. While the city has nixed a planned geothermal heating and cooling system, is swapping customized interior fixtures for standard ones, and is replacing the aluminum façade with painted concrete, they say the library will stay true to its original design.

Read More

“SuralArk” Selected as Best Folly for Summer Installation at Socrates Sculpture Park

(Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold / Courtesy Architectural League)

(Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold / Courtesy Architectural League)

Socrates Sculpture Park and the Architectural League have selected Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold as the winners of their Folly 2014 competition. Commenced in earlier this year and launched in 2012, the contest’s name and theme derive from the 18th and 19th century Romantic practice of architectural follies, or structures with little discernible function that are typically sited within a garden or landscape. Austin and Mergold’s SuralArk was deemed the most deserving contemporary interpretation of the tradition, and will be erected within the park’s Long Island City confines by early May.

More after the jump.

Pittsburgh’s Transformation: The 11 Projects Moving The Steel City Forward

The re-opening of Point State Park. (Courtesy Bridgett Kay / Riverlife)

The re-opening of Point State Park. (Courtesy Bridgett Kay / Riverlife)

From its streets to its rivers to its skyline, Pittsburgh is a city in transformation. The Steel City is diversifying its economy, improving its streetscape and becoming a new hub for the creative class. Business Insider has even declared Pittsburgh to be “The Next Hipster Haven.” But the transformation has meant more than coffee shops, bike-share, and startups—even though that’s certainly playing a part. As the city changes, though, it’s too easy to ask if Pittsburgh is the “Next [Enter City Here].” Because the “Next Pittsburgh” will not be the “Next Austin,” or even the “Next Portland.” It’s shaping up to be something entirely it’s own. Simply put, “The Next Pittsburgh” will be just that.

Read More

Little BIG Maze: Bjarke Ingels Group Designs Labyrinth for National Building Museum

Design, East, On View
Wednesday, April 2, 2014
.
(Courtesy BIG / National Building Museum)

(Courtesy BIG / National Building Museum)

The National Building Museum was smart to wait till April 2nd to announce their latest project, lest anyone think it was a cleverly crafted April Fool’s prank. The Washington, D.C.–based institution said today over Twitter (“A-MAZE-ING NEWS”) that Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) will design an unconventional maze to be temporarily housed in its grand atrium. Perhaps inspired by the summer tradition of the corn maze, the BIG installation will debut in the West Court of the building’s cavernous Great Hall on July 4th, bringing new meaning to Independence Day to those wandering within its walls.

More after the jump.

Page 17 of 152« First...10...1516171819...304050...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License