Remembering Charles Gwathmey

East
Tuesday, August 4, 2009
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Gwathmey

Gwathmey

Charles Gwathmey passed away on Monday, but he was fondly remembered by his many colleagues, including Robert Siegel, Richard Meier, Michael Graves, and Peter Eisenman, in our obituary. We invite readers to share their own memories of this “fighter for modernism” in the comments section below. But please, be erudite, as Gwathmey would have had it no other way.

Rezoning Day

East, East Coast
Thursday, July 30, 2009
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Yorkville, one of the high density areas of Manhattan that will be elligible for more affordble housing under a change to city zoning approved Wednesday. (Wikimedia Commons)

Yorkville, one of the high density areas of Manhattan that will be elligible for more affordble housing under a change to city zoning approved Wednesday. (Wikimedia Commons)

The rezoning of Coney Island may have takn up all the oxygen at the City Council Wednesday, but it was far from the only rezoning to pass, and far from the only important one. The council also approved a major downzoning of Williamsburg and Greenpoint, which, at 175 blocks, is not only huge, but important, as it was meant to protect the area from out-of-scale overdevelopment. It may be a little too late for that, but better late than never, we guess. Or maybe never again is more like it. The Flatbush neighborhood on the south side of Prospect Park got a similar treatment, receiving a massive 180 block downzoning again to protect against uncharacteristic development. Dumbo was rezoned, though in a particularly contextual manner, given its unique historic character, as were four contiguous neighborhoods in Queens. But perhaps most important was a citywide change to the inclusionary housing bonus. Read More

Stalling Out

East, East Coast
Tuesday, July 28, 2009
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A stalled building in--where else--Williamsburg. (Courtesy Curbed.com)

A stalled building in--where else--Williamsburg. (Courtesy Curbed.com)

Last week, the Times reported on efforts by the city to address the wave of stalled projects plaguing the city. It was a surprising story, but not because of the news of the program–mind you, we were well ahead of the Gray Lady on that. No, what took us aback was the huge jump in the number of stalled buildings the Department of Buildings had recorded between the time our story ran on June 11 and theirs on June 19, with the total number of stalled buildings more than doubling from 138 to 362. We immediately called the DOB to find out more but, well, this being summer, we just heard back today. Read More

Fontainebleau Anew

East
Monday, July 27, 2009
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A new free-standing spa at the Fontainebleau Miami features a hurricane-rated glass curtainwall. Goldfinger, eat your heart out. (Courtesy Fontainebleau)

A new free-standing spa at the Fontainebleau Miami features a hurricane-rated glass curtainwall. Goldfinger, eat your heart out. (Courtesy Fontainebleau)

Morris Lapidus’ Fontainebleau in Miami is one of the most recognizable hotels in the United States, thanks in no small part to its frequent appearances in television shows and films, perhaps most notably and intimately in the 1964 James Bond movie Goldfinger. A recent two-year revitalization has brought the old bastion of luxury and class—which had begun to show its wear—back to prime condition. More than just polish up the surfaces, the effort included the addition of a free-standing spa. The designers, Dallas-based architectural firm HKS, selected a blue tinted glass for the spa’s curtain wall. In addition to referencing the adjacent pool’s azure complexion, the glass (1 5/16-inch thick Viracon laminated units with a Vanceva Storm interlayer) meets Miami’s strict large missile impact and hurricane codes. Goldfinger would be proud.

GSA Now Hiring

East, East Coast
Friday, July 24, 2009
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Now Hiring: 26 Federal Plaza

Now Hiring: 26 Federal Plaza

With the prospects for architectural work tilting downward once again, we can imagine you might be uncertain about the future. Not to worry, though, as a friend sends along the message that the GSA is hiring in its New York office, among many others. And best of all, things are looking up at the agency, as you could go to work, at least in some capacity, for the new director of the Design Excellence program, which is getting a much-needed shot in the arm. Best of luck.

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Two Strikes for Chiofaro

East
Tuesday, July 21, 2009
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Sez Boston developer Don Chiofaro: Mayor Menino, tear down this wall! So I can build to 70 stories! (Courtesy Boston Globe)

Sez Boston developer Don Chiofaro: Mayor Menino, tear down this wall! So I can build to 70 stories! (Courtesy Boston Globe)

After the recent mixed reviews of his KPF-designed Boston Arch project, local developer Don Chiofaro has been told within the last few days by both state and city officials that his proposal is considerably too large and may take years of regulatory review and planning to get off the ground. No worry, as the infamously forthright developer has taken his project to the people, counting on concerts and blaring signs like the one above to show that it is the mayor and the BRA that are bullying his grand vision and not the other way around.

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Unite de Stoop

East
Friday, July 17, 2009
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Children frolic on Le Corbusier's Unite d'Habitation in 1959. (Rene Burri/Magnum Photos/Slate)

Children frolic on Le Corbusier's Unite d'Habitation in 1959. (Rene Burri/Magnum Photos/Slate).

In today’s “Today’s Pictures” feature over on Slate, Magnum presents photos of a subject near and dear to New Yorkers’ summertime hearts: stoops. Many of the photos, including some by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Bruce Davidson, feature the environs of our fair city. But the one pic that really caught our attention was from Marseilles, where Rene Burri snapped some children at play on the patio of Le Corbusier’s Unite d’Habitation. Modern architecture never looked so fun.

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To Every Season

East
Friday, July 17, 2009
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The Pool Room at the Four Seasons (photos courtesy of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation)

The Pool Room at the Four Seasons (photos courtesy of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation)

Wednesday night the Guggenheim held a benefit dinner to honor the fiftieth anniversaries of the Wright museum and of the Four Seasons restaurant. During dessert Guggenheim Director Richard Armstrong interviewed Phyllis Lambert and critic Martin Filler about the two architects, though Lambert held sway for most of the conversation. Read More

Didya Hear the One About Pitetsbkrrh?

East
Thursday, July 16, 2009
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Ask anyone from Pittsburgh (present company included) what the blinking light atop the Grant Building is, and they’ll quickly respond, “Easy! It spells out Pittsburgh in morse code.” Well, not exactly. Turns out a local grad student who also happens to be a ham radio operator was up on Mount Washington for the annual 4th of July fireworks (of which we have the best, courtesy the great Zambelli family). While he waited for the lights to go off, he was watching the red flashing light atop the Grant Building–the city’s first skyscraper when it was completed in 1929 and a wonderful art deco achievement by Henry Hornbostel–when he noticed something that didn’t belong. Read More

Drinking in History

East
Thursday, July 16, 2009
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Evolution of the Speakeasy, Barney Gallant’s “Speako de Luxe,” 1933 (Courtesy Museum of the City of New York)

Evolution of the Speakeasy, Barney Gallant’s “Speako de Luxe,” 1933 (Courtesy Museum of the City of New York)

Last night, the Museum of the City of New York hosted the first installment of their summer long prohibition-era themed parties on the newly renovated Polshek Partnership-designed terrace overlooking Central Park. Read More

I Brought My Pencil

East
Thursday, July 16, 2009
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The fenestration of the East Harlem School was designed to let in ample daylight while creating a sheltered environment for the students. (Courtesy www.freelandarch.com)

The fenestration of the East Harlem School, seen here from a typical classroom, was designed to let in ample daylight while creating a sheltered environment for the students. (Courtesy www.freelandarch.com)

We have covered the East Harlem School a few times, once in a studio visit we did with the architect, Peter L. Gluck & Partners (09_05.21.2008), and once in our 2009 favorite sources issue (specifically here). Now construction on the project has been completed and Gluck has sent us some images of the finished product. According to the architect, who also provided construction management services, the school was built for $330 per square foot. Gluck also reports that his firm returned $500,000 to the client in unused contingencies. See what $330 per square foot will get you in Manhattan when your architect is also your CM after the jump. Read More

Times Square Time Lapse

East
Wednesday, July 15, 2009
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My In Detail piece in the current issue is about Eleven Times Square, a speculative office tower at the corner of 8th Ave. and 42nd St., which was designed by FXFowle and is now in the final stages of construction. Lucky for you and me, Plaza Construction had the site photographed everyday for the past two years or so from the same vantage on a nearby tower, and has compiled these daily progress photos in the above stop-action video. There is much to admire in the presentation, but pay close attention to the erection of the structural elements. (Hint: The Tootsie Roll center of the Tootsie Pop goes up first.) Read More

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