Hopkins Architects to Transform Harvard’s Holyoke Center into New Campus Hub

East
Monday, November 18, 2013
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Josep Lluis Sert's Holyoke Center at Harvard University (Courtesy Docomomo via Harvard)

Josep Lluís Sert’s Holyoke Center at Harvard University (Courtesy Docomomo via Harvard)

Harvard’s Holyoke Center, designed by renowned Catalan architect and former Dean on the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Josep Lluís Sert, will soon be undergoing major renovations, university President Drew Faust announced last Thursday. London-based Hopkins Architects, the designers of Princeton’s Frick Chemistry Laboratory and Yale’s Kroon Hall, have signed on to transform the 50-year-old, cast-in-place administrative building into multifaceted campus center by 2018.

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Major Donation Completes Push for Tod Williams Billie Tsien Lakeside Center in Prospect Park

City Terrain, East
Friday, November 15, 2013
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Rennovated Wollman Rink at Lakeside Park will offer services during all four seasons. (Courtesy Tod Williams Billie Tsien)

A renovated Wollman Rink will offer services during all four seasons, including its original winter ice skating. (Courtesy Tod Williams Billie Tsien)

Brooklyn’s Prospect Park will soon receive a refurbished Lakeside Center, with help from a $10 million donation to the Prospect Park Alliance and the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.

The LeFrak family, real estate royalty within the borough and in the Tri-state area, has gifted the sum in support of the oft-delayed green space revamp, which finally set a completion date for December of this year. In the heart of Prospect Park’s 526-acre grounds, project restoration by architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien and construction company Sciame will redevelop the Wollman Ice Rink for use during all four seasons. This lakeside facility is to be renamed The Samuel J. and Ethel LeFrak Center, honoring the family’s philanthropy in Brooklyn.

Continue Reading After the Jump.

Susan Morris Surveys the 4th Edition of New York’s Documentary Film Festival, DOC NYC

East, On View
Friday, November 15, 2013
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Still from If You Build It. (Courtesy Long Shot Factory Release)

Still from If You Build It. (Courtesy Long Shot Factory Release)

DOC NYC
New York City
November 14-21
IFC Center and SVA Theater

This year the 4th DOC NYC documentary film festival boasts 132 films and events: 73 feature-length, 39 shorts, and 20 panels. Tucked into the schedule are films about architecture, design, and the arts amongst a wide array of subjectmatter. Only one, If You Build It, was also seen at the recent Architecture & Design Film Festival, so here’s your chance to view a new crop and to see the ones you’ve missed.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Edward Durell Stone House in Darien, Connecticut Under Threat

East
Thursday, November 14, 2013
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Edward Durell Stone's American modernist home in Darien, Connecticut (Larry Merz)

Edward Durell Stone’s American modernist home in Darien, Connecticut (Larry Merz)

A house designed by Edward Durell Stone, located in Darien, Connecticut, is under threat of demolition to make way for a developer’s vision: a neocolonial pastiche home. The 2,334-square-foot home is sited on a 1.1 acre wooded lot in the private community of Tokeneke. The house represents a transitional moment in Stone’s multifaceted career.  Read More

After More Than A Decade, A New Office Building Opens on the World Trade Center

East
Thursday, November 14, 2013
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Mayor Bloomberg presides over the Four World Trade Center ribbon-cutting ceremony. (Edward Reed / Courtesy NYC Mayor's Office)

Mayor Bloomberg presides over the Four World Trade Center ribbon-cutting ceremony. (Edward Reed / Courtesy NYC Mayor’s Office)

Yesterday, something remarkable happened. More than a decade after the destruction of the World Trade Center, the walls and fences surrounding a small corner of the site came down and the public was able to glimpse a new stretch of Greenwich Street—which will eventually bisect the site—as well as Fumihiko Maki‘s completed 72-story tower, Four World Trade. The minimalist tower is the first completed building on the site, though tenants will now begin building out their floors.

Watch a time-lapse construction video after the jump.

We’re Bowled Over by James Corner Field Operations’s Plans For the High Line

City Terrain, East
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
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A large, green bowl, dubbed the Spur, will float above the intersection 10th Avenue and 30th Street as part of the final phase of the High Line(Image James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Courtesy the City of New York)

A large, green bowl, dubbed the Spur, will float above the intersection 10th Avenue and 30th Street (Image James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Courtesy the City of New York)

This week, Friends of the High Line revealed the design concept for the third and final section of the High Line with a tantalizing set of renderings from James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Beginning at the intersection of 10th Avenue and West 30th Street, the latest addition, known as the High Line at the Rail Yards, will wrap westward around Related Companies’ impending Hudson Yards mega-development before culminating on 34th Street between 11th and 12th Avenues.

Continue reading after the jump.

Free Admission to the Expo Floor at ABX Boston!.  Free Admission to the Expo Floor at ABX Boston! Will you be in Boston between November 19 – 21, 2013? Are you in the architecture and construction industry? You’re in luck! AN readers can take advantage of free access to the exposition floor at ABX, the Architecture Boston Expo. Simply use promo code ANP13 when registering. ABX is produced by the Boston Society of Architects and bills itself as “one of the largest events for the design and construction industry in the country, and the largest regional conference and tradeshow.” Don’t miss out! Check out an interactive floor plan of the exposition floor here or get more information on the ABX website.

 

New Vision for Penn’s Landing Unveiled, Now How to Fund It

City Terrain, East
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
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(Courtesy Delaware River Waterfront Corporation)

Hargreaves Associates renders the South Street Pedestrian Bridge as a landmark arched suspension into the new Penn’s Landing. (Courtesy Delaware River Waterfront Corporation)

Plans for Penn’s Landing have been floating around for several years now, but at a public meeting in Philadelphia last month, they finally began to crystallize. The Delaware River Waterfront Corporation (DRWC), which oversees the 6 to 7 mile strip of waterfront property outlined in the Central Delaware Master Plan, has hired Hargreaves Associates—the firm responsible for the overhaul of Houston and Louisville’s waterfronts—to revive the deserted stretch along the Delaware River. New renderings revealed at the event connect Old City to the waterfront with a large promenade park featuring green space, mixed-use residential and retail buildings, and an expansion of the existing South Street Pedestrian Bridge.

Continue Reading After the Jump.

Clemson Architecture Celebrates 100 Years of Critical Regionalism with Symposium

Dean's List, East, Newsletter
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
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(Courtesy Clemson University)

(Courtesy Clemson University)

On Friday, October 18th, an important symposium took place commemorating the Centennial Celebration of Clemson University School of Architecture.

Located in Clemson, South Carolina, an idyllic college town halfway between Atlanta and Charlotte, and serving as the only School of Architecture in the state, the leadership of the school has historically created a curriculum that balances service to its home state and connections to the wider world. In fact, the “Fluid Campus” has become a hallmark of the institution with almost all of the students, undergraduate and graduate, spending at least one semester at one of three urban satellite campuses: Genoa, Italy; Barcelona, Spain; and Charleston, South Carolina.

Southern Roots + Global Reach,” a year of events commemorating this spirit, culminated with the Centennial Symposium: “The Architecture of Regionalism in the age of Globalism.” Organized by Director of Graduate Studies, Peter Laurence, with the support of Kate Schwennsen, former AIA president and chair of the School of Architecture, the event sought to deepen our definition of critical regionalism in an era of expanded global diversity.

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One World Trade Center unseats Willis Tower as western hemisphere’s tallest building

East, Midwest, National
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
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Left: 1 World Trade Center; Right: Willis Tower. (Pat Hawks and gigi_nyc via Flickr; composite by A|N)

Left: 1 World Trade Center; Right: Willis Tower. (Pat Hawks and gigi_nyc via Flickr; composite by AN)

Move over, Willis Tower. The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) issued its official ruling Tuesday: New York’s One World Trade Center unseats the Chicago skyscraper as the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. Read More

Ten Finalists Selected for Renovation of Mies-Designed MLK Memorial Library in DC

East
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
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Mies van der Rohe's Martin Luther King Memorial Library in Washington DC (Cliff1066™/ Flickr)

Mies van der Rohe’s Martin Luther King Memorial Library in Washington DC (Cliff1066 / Flickr)

Out of a crop of 26, ten teams have been invited to present their technical proposals for the renovation of the Mies van der Rohe–designed Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, D.C. District officials are hoping to transform the landmark 1972 building, Mies’ last built work and his only in D.C., into a state-of-the-art central library fit for the nation’s capital.

See the finalists after the jump.

Bike Share Round-up> Chicago Surges, New York’s Safety Record Shines, Los Angeles Lags

East, Midwest, National, West
Monday, November 11, 2013
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Citibikes like this one hit New York streets in May 2013. (Jesse Chan-Norris/Flickr)

Citibikes like this one hit New York streets in May 2013. (Jesse Chan-Norris/Flickr)

We hope you’ve stretched your hamstrings—there have been a lot of developments in U.S. bike sharing programs lately, and we’re taking another whirl through them now.

Although not without hang-ups, New York’s Citi Bike has at least not killed anyone yet. People love to joke about clueless tourists riding on the sidewalk, or on heavy-traffic avenues, or “salmoning” the wrong way down one-way streets — that’s true in Chicago as well as New York — but the fact that no bikeshare has so far produced little to no traffic carnage should come as no surprise, writes Charles Komanoff for Streetsblog.

Continue reading after the jump.

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