Beauty Bites Back with Peter Cook's Crab

East
Thursday, November 18, 2010
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Peter Cook's scheme for the Taiwan Tower Conceptual Design competition. (Courtesy Crab)

Peter Cook–the real one from England, not the Hampton socialite architect impersonator–was in town last week and showed us some of the work from his firm Crab. Sir Peter was here to appear on a panel at Pratt Institute for the new book by Yael Reisner with Fleur Watson, Architecture and Beauty: Conversations with Architects About a Troubled Relationship. Cook and fellow beauticians including Will Alsop, Gaetano Pesce, Lebbeus Woods, KOL/MAC, and Hernan Diaz Alonso all took the subject head-on, and proved they think about aesthetics and form up front in the design process, though they seldom will admit to it. They did nothing to dispel Reisner’s thesis that even though, since the advent of modernism, only principles of rationalism are allowed to be used in explaining the building arts, architecture is still primarily a formal practice in the spirit of Einstein, who said that for him “visual imagery occurred first and words followed.” Read More

Kids Build Massive Model of the High Line

East, East Coast
Wednesday, November 17, 2010
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Kids build a model of the High Line (Courtesy High Line Blog)

Kids build a model of the High Line (Courtesy High Line Blog)

Children from a school in the West Village love the High Line and they have a giant model to prove it.  Carol Levitt’s second grade starchitects-in-training recently finished their wood-block coup de grâce detailing the story of the famed elevated park – past and present.

Take a closer look at the model after the jump.

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Architects Do Double Duty As Set Designers

East
Wednesday, November 17, 2010
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Aging is a universal theme. ANCHISES, a new performance premiering at the Abrons Arts Center in New York tonight, explores that amid a striking set from design firm Harrison Atelier (HAt), who are also billed as co-collaborators with choreographer Jonah Bokaer. Central to this latest version of the Greek myth is Anchises’ struggle to salvage memories from the burning city of Troy. This is reflected in the set design, where, according to HAt’s website, “the set creates an environment that scripts the dance.” Blocks, representing both the old and new city, are a central part of this multi-generational performance, and a recent New York Times review championed their use of medical tubing to subtly hint at the struggle of growing old.

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Potential Pyramid Scheme in DUMBO

East
Wednesday, November 17, 2010
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photo by Missy S./Flickr

Is NYC’s next architectural adventure shaped like a pyramid? Maybe, if one of the groups competing for usage space in Brooklyn’s historic Tobacco Warehouse has its way. The recently stabilized structure  is currently under the purview of the powers-that-be at the new Brooklyn Bridge Park, which sees the Warehouse as “most compelling public spaces” in the city’s quest to spruce up the Brooklyn waterfront.

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Rudolph’s New York Home Passes Landmark Test

East, East Coast
Wednesday, November 17, 2010
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23 Beekman Place (Courtesy Paul Rudolph Foundation)

23 Beekman Place (Courtesy Paul Rudolph Foundation)

The latest Upper East Side landmark isn’t another of its signature rowhouses, but rather what’s atop one of those brownstones.  Yesterday, the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission unanimously approved landmark status for mid-century architect Paul Rudolph‘s less-than-context-sensitive home at 23 Beekman Place.

And that’s great news for New York’s modern architectural heritage. Read More.

A Sculpture By Any Other Name. . .

East
Tuesday, November 16, 2010
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Isa Genzken's installation at New Museum. (Photo: Kubota Photography/New Museum)

Haters of kitsch rejoice!  No longer will visitors to the New Museum be greeted by Ugo Rondinone’s glowing, rainbow affirmation.  Hell, Yes! has been replaced as part of the museum’s ongoing Façade Sculpture Program.  In its place, Rose II, a far subtler work by German artist Isa Genzken.  Growing from the first tier of SANAA’s ethereal Bowery building, the sculpture, a 28-foot tall rose, was created in 1993 and reprised in 2007. Read More

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MEKA Goes Modular with West Village Eco-Home

East
Tuesday, November 16, 2010
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The modular unit as seen from Charles and Washington Streets in Greenwich Village. (Tom Stoelker)

On the corner of Washington and Charles streets in Greenwich Village, a modular home has been plopped down in a vacant parking lot. It may seem an unlikely sight—or site for that matter—but what distinguishes this home from most of its tony neighbors is its eye-catching price tag: $35,000. Read More

Have Your Say On the Future of the BQE Monday Evening

East, East Coast
Monday, November 15, 2010
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Final BQE Community Meeting This Evening, Monday, November 15

Final BQE Community Meeting This Evening, Monday, November 15

It’s not too late to join community leaders from the Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, and Columbia Street Waterfront neighborhoods along with the New York City Economic Development Corporation to discuss the future of the Bronx-Queens Expressway.  The third and final BQE Community Design Workshop takes place this evening and will cover refined designed proposals aimed to reconnect areas surrounding the urban expressway.
More information after the jump.

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Gehry Gets Frank With Pratt Students

East
Thursday, November 11, 2010
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Julie V. Iovine with an introspective Gehry. (Photo: Jennifer K. Gorsche)

Famed architect Frank Gehry enthralled a packed auditorium of students and community members at Pratt Institute yesterday afteroon. Speaking with The Architect’s Newspaper’s own executive editor Julie V. Iovine and Yael Reisner, author of Architecture and Beauty: Conversations with Architects about a Troubled Relationship, Gehry reminded the budding architects in the audience that his job involves more than just sitting around and creating curvy buildings from crumpled paper–it’s about delivering a finished product to a client, albeit a unique one.

Read More

Foamly Footed

East
Tuesday, November 9, 2010
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Leong Leong's amorphous Siki Im pop-up under the High Line (Photo: Pete Deevakul)

More cave-itecture under the High Line.  Architecture firm Leong Leong and fashion designer Siki Im have teamed up for the fifth and final installation in the Building Fashion series of pop-up collaborations beneath Chelsea’s High Line Park.  Picking up where Snarkitecture and Richard Chai left off, Leong Leong has turned the former Sales Tin for Neil Denari’s HL23 condos into another amorphous cave-like interior—only now you’ll have to take off your shoes before entering.  “We wanted to radically transform the interior,” explained principal Chris Leong.  “We wanted to breakdown the traditional pop-up experience.”  To do this, the firm oriented the store around a parabolic, foam-covered ramp and hung clothes seemingly at random from the walls and ceiling, which were sculpted with the same soy-based spray-foam. Read More

The Taxman Cometh for Moss – UPDATED

East
Friday, November 5, 2010
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Moss on the rocks? (Alan G. Brake)

UPDATE — November 10, 2010 — The good news is Moss reopened today after resolving a reported tax bill of around $150,000. It seems that for now the store is safe. The bad news is your credit card may not be.

Design Hates a Depression“—that was the verdict delivered by Murray Moss, owner of the eponymous store and gallery space in Soho, at the beginning of last year. It seems that he was right. As of Friday morning, the store had been seized for nonpayment of taxes. For now, the arbiter of design retail in NYC and beyond is the property of the State of New York.

Read More

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Zero Energy Red Hook Green Gets Zero Help From City

East, East Coast
Tuesday, November 2, 2010
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Rendering of the proposed Redhook Green project (Courtesy Jay Amato / RHG)

Rendering of the proposed Redhook Green project (Courtesy Jay Amato / RHG)

Red Hook Green gets a red light from the NYC Department of Buildings.  Brooklyn’s touted “brownstone of the future” is up against the ropes after a zoning decision ruled the mixed-use building cannot proceed as planned.  Jay Amato’s ultra-sustainable, shipping-container chic Red Hook Green was denied its proposed accessory residential use on industrially zoned land, officially throwing the entire project into limbo.

Read more after the jump.

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