AN Mixed Media> The Furniture Debates

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, March 16, 2011
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Michael Graves discusses furniture design (BK / The Architect's Newspaper)

Michael Graves discusses furniture design (BK / The Architect's Newspaper)

“Drafted: the evolving role of architects in furniture design.” It was a MAD idea: To talk about why American manufacturers don’t do the job they once did in supporting American architects and designers at making furniture. Held March 10 at the Museum of Arts & Design’s own restored and midcentury soigné auditorium, the assembled panel really knew what they were talking about:

Michael Graves recalled his early days working for George Nelson in riveting detail and why Target has dropped independent designers; Jeffrey Bernett, one of the few American designers routinely designing for B&B, summed up Italy versus Herman Miller; Gisue Hariri of Hariri & Hariri eloquently addressed why architects feel compelled to make furniture, and what happened when her architecture firm tried to go there on a larger scale; and Granger Moorhead of Moorhead & Moorhead gave great reason for everyone to hope there is another golden age, especially for New York furniture designers, just ahead.

Watch the highlight reel after the jump.

Manufacturers Trust Gets Yellow Light

East, East Coast
Wednesday, March 16, 2011
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Manufacturers Trust Company Building in 1955 (Courtesy Municipal Art Society)

Manufacturers Trust Company Building in 1955 (Courtesy Municipal Art Society)

“Sometimes the best way to restore a historic structure is to reuse it.” The comment came from Landmarks Preservation Commissioner Robert Tierney at the conclusion of Tuesday’s landmarks hearing on revisions proposed by Vornado Realty for interiors of the recently landmarked Manufacturers Trust Building on Fifth Avenue. The statement summed up the mood of the commission with regard to changes in the space, originally designed by Gordon Bunschaft, which include dividing the first floor to make space for two retail tenants. Most of the commission picked apart the specifics while maintaining that the architects from SOM overseeing the renovation were generally on the right track.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gowanus On My Mind

East
Friday, March 11, 2011
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A view of the Gowanus Canal (all images courtesy of Gowanus By Design)

 

The Gowanus Canal has been in the news a lot lately, with its superfund designation and sunken schooner. The canal and surrounding neighborhood have long fascinated architects and urbanists, and has been the subject of numerous architecture school design studios. A new ideas competition looks to develop that fascination into a series of proposals for the site, which would improve connectivity across and around the polluted waterway and take better advantage of the area’s unique history, character, and economic potential.

Read More

Green in Queens: Private Solar Array Goes Live

East, Newsletter
Friday, March 11, 2011
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Panels were installed by National Grid Energy Management working with Solar Energy Systems. (Courtesy Davis & Warshow)

One of the city’s largest private solar power installations promises to produce 270,000 kWh of clean energy annually, eliminating about 235,000 pounds of carbon dioxide pollution each year. The new solar array is part of an initiative by employee-owned kitchen and bath distributor Davis & Warshow to green its Queens headquarters. The installation includes 1,038 panels affixed to the rooftops of three buildings in the company’s 250,000-square-foot complex on Maspeth Creek. Read More

Prospect Park West Bike Lane Target of Lawsuit

East, East Coast
Thursday, March 10, 2011
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Dedicated bike lane along Brooklyn's Prospect Park West (Courtesy Steven Vance)

Dedicated bike lane along Brooklyn's Prospect Park West (Courtesy Steven Vance)

That thin ribbon of green paint along Brooklyn’s Prospect Park West sure is a touchy subject for residents of the Park Slope neighborhood, and beyond–they’re even talking about it in London. Many love the new separated bike lane installed in June 2010–the “pro-laners”–but a vocal group packing some political power would rather see the lane removed–the “anti-laners.”

Read More

Bjarke′s Bite

East
Thursday, March 10, 2011
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Courtesy Chris Kannen

Courtesy Chris Kannen

I assumed he would be articulate as all OMA graduates are, and I’d heard he was as intellectually entertaining as only those TED Talk types can be, but I was surprised that Bjarke Ingels, the Danish architect recently taking the city in a storm of media, could also simply converse. And he did so with ease last night in a Q&A with The Architect’s Newspaper as part of a Design Trust for Public Space council member drive at the oh-so-private Core Club. The theme was “New York After Bloomberg,” which frankly scares some people, especially architects, as the mayor has been a practically unprecedented supporter of the building arts and enlightened zoning throughout his three-term tenure.

Read more after the jump.

World Trade Update: Sneak Peak Inside Tower One

East
Thursday, March 10, 2011
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Thanks to Council Member Margaret Chin’s office, we’re able to get a peak out the windows of One World Trade. Yesterday, Chin and fellow Council Members of the Lower Manhattan Redevelopment Committee got a tour of the 49th floor with Port Authority Executive Director Chris Ward. While “sweeping” and “majestic” are terms that will no doubt soon be overused in the future to describe the views, we’ll use them here, just this once.

Read More

Sit Up Straight: WXY Zipper Bench

East
Thursday, March 10, 2011
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WXY's new zipper benches welcome sitters at Peter Minuit Plaza.

New zipper benches designed by WXY are in place at Peter Minuit Plaza. The skateboard-proof benches in front of the Staten Island Ferry Terminal got a proper workout yesterday, despite the cold. The sinuous design begins as two benches facing opposite directions before zipping up and melding into one surface offering the sitter a choice of two views.

Morphing benches seem to be making statements in more places than just New York as well. Last week’s AN Fabrikator story spotlighted subway benches in Philly that scrunch up to discourage people from lying down.  It would seem that firms are taking on bad behavior by pushing the design envelope.

Check out a few more photos after the jump.

Gimme Shelter: Bike Stations for Fresh Kills

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 8, 2011
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The new bike maintenance shelters make room for pedestrians. The roof holds the solar panels. Courtesy NYC Parks and Recreation/James Corner Field Operations

Despite all the controversy surrounding bike lanes and cyclists elsewhere in the city, Fresh Kills South has adopted a rather pro bike stance (though who’d expect there to be much disagreement when the only other traffic to contend with is that of joggers, pedestrians, and bird watchers). New bike maintenance stations designed by James Corner Field Operations will eventually dot the landscape of the of the entire park, and their design nods equally to both the biker and the walker.

Read more after the jump.

Navarro’s Enlightened Edifices

East
Thursday, March 3, 2011
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Navarro's Armory Fence at Kasman Gallery's booth.

The Brooklyn-based Chilean artist Ivan Navarro will take to the floor at the Amory Show tonight, as well as to the walls at the Paul Kasmin Gallery on West 27th St. and 10th Ave. “The Armory Fence” installation outlines the entirety of the gallery’s booth as a humming neon riff on a conventional suburban fence. At 23 by 36 feet it cuts quite a substantial swath of real estate at the fair. At the gallery, neon wall sculptures inspired by some of the world’s most famous buildings suggest a disco take on the familiar icons, but a second glance reveals a deeper sense of gravity, with words like “surrender” or “abandon” subtly etched atop the glass.

Read More

A Pictorial Description of Broadway in 1899

East
Thursday, March 3, 2011
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Broadway, East Side. Wall to Liberty St. (Courtesy NYPL)

Broadway, East Side. Wall to Liberty St. (Courtesy NYPL)

Last week, we came across illustrator James Gilliver Hancock’s series of playful block elevations titled “All the Buildings in New York.” It turns out this impulse to sketch block upon block of New York’s architecture has been around for quite some time. In 1899, the Mail & Express newspaper company published a graphic journey down Manhattan’s Broadway in a book called A Pictorial description of Broadway now archived at the New York Public Library.

The stroll down Broadway 112 years ago reveals just how much New York has evolved over the past century. As the NYPL says, “The result, as you can see here, is a 19th century version of Google’s Street View, allowing us to flip through the images block by block, passing parks, churches, novelty stores, furriers, glaziers, and other businesses of the city’s past.”

Check out some of our favorite blocks after the jump.

Last Chance> Paradise Lost in New York

East, On View
Thursday, March 3, 2011
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Courtesy Andrea Blum

Courtesy Andrea Blum

  • Paradise Lost by Andrea Blum
  • Sikkema Jenkins & Co
  • 530 W. 22 Street
  • New York, NY
  • Through March 5

The dialogue between architects and artists in New York is one of the great-if often over looked- strengths of practice in this city. In fact, many architects visit New York not to see the latest building, but the exhibits in its galleries and museums. It has been the case, at least since MOMA’s epic modernism exhibit of 1932 and later Frederic Kielser’s Endless House series of exhibitions that the conversation between architects and artists in this city is endlessly complex and without equal in any other city.

Read more after the jump.

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