WTC Update: Venting

East
Wednesday, July 13, 2011
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The vertical vents on the south face Maki's 4 World Trade.

It’s been several weeks since our last visit to the World Trade Center site. On our return today we were taken with the manner in which different architects handle ventilation at the site. The most obvious example are the two large vent structures that protrude from the west side of the Memorial Plaza. The concrete buildings are a necessary solution to a complicated infrastructure problem.  Davis Brody Bond (now Aedas) designed a mesh mask for the concrete structures and workers were putting the finishing touches on south building today.

more photos after the jump

EVENT> “History of Design” Author Talk: Thursday, July 14

East
Wednesday, July 13, 2011
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Co-authors Jeff Byles and Anne Ferebee will spotlight NYC in talk on "A History of Design," July 14.

Thursday, July 14 (tomorrow!)

12:00pm

92YTribeca MAINSTAGE

200 Hudson Street

Anne Ferebee and Architect’s Newspaper alum Jeff Byles discuss their new book A History of Design from the Victorian Era to the Present (W.W. Norton, 2nd ed), turning a  spotlight on New York City as a “roiling epicenter of modern design innovation, with a focus on architecture and urbanism stretching from that Victorian-era paragon of poetry in stone and steel—the Brooklyn Bridge—to Mies van der Rohe’s sublime corporate style and a new generation’s minimalist marvels on the Bowery.” (Not since e.e. cummings has NYC sounded so good!)

Tickets $16, purchase online at www.92Y.org.

 

On View> 194X–9/11: American Architects and the City

East
Tuesday, July 12, 2011
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Mies van der Rohe's Museum for a Small City Project, 1942 (Courtesy MoMA)

Mies van der Rohe's Museum for a Small City Project, 1942 (Courtesy MoMA)

194X–9/11: American Architects and the City
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd St.
Through January 2

Prompted by the United States’ entrance into World War II in 1942, Architectural Forum magazine commissioned pioneering architects to imagine and plan a postwar American city. At the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, 194X-9/11: American Architects and the City features the plans, renderings, and sculpture of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn, Paul Rudolph, and Rem Koolhaas and their ideas for cities of the future. Rarely displayed works, such as Mies van der Rohe’s collage Museum for a Small City Project (1942), above, reveal plans for cultural centers and urban life in uncertain times.

On View> The American Style: Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis

East
Monday, July 11, 2011
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(COURTESY MCNY)

(COURTESY MCNY)

The American Style:
Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis
Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Avenue
Through October 30

Following the U.S. Centennial of 1876, architecture in New York City was defined by what was known as “the American style,” a visual language referencing both the nation’s nostalgia for its beginnings and its progressive aspirations. A new exhibition reveals the impact of Colonial Revival on the cityscape through vintage photographs and objects like a 1926 mahogany settee by the Company of Master Craftsmen, whose volutes reflect a resurgence in classicism that is the trademark of the Colonial.

More images after the jump.

On View> Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977

East
Monday, July 11, 2011
.
(COURTESY DIA: BEACON)

(COURTESY DIA: BEACON)

Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977
Dia: Beacon/CCS Bard
3 Beekman Street/18 West 86th St.
Beacon, NY/New York, NY

Though October 31

Dia: Beacon and the Bard Center for Curatorial Studies have co-organized a comprehensive exhibition of the post-war German artist Blinky Palermo. Palermo’s works on paper (1963–1973) are on view at Bard, while his Metal Pictures and later works (1973–1977) are displayed in Dia: Beacon’s expansive galleries. A student of Joseph Beuys, Palermo’s work dealt with the relationship of color and space, and in Europe he gained notice for his abstract large-scale murals. Inspired by a trip to America in the early ‘70s, Palermo created the To the People of New York series, above, based on the colors of the East German and West German flags.

Another painting after the jump.

What Ales, Robert Moses?

East
Friday, July 8, 2011
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Who knew the Power Broker himself was a beer man? The Robert Moses of my imagination could be spotted, martini in hand, at a swanky Manhattan lounge. But in reality, the workaholic was such a control freak that he would never permit himself to loosen up in public, instead spending much of his free time stolen away from the city sailing on the Great South Bay in his boat the Sea-Ef. (Even then, his mind was still on work: he once grounded the boat on a quite visible sand bar thinking of his plans for New York!) Ceaselessly maneuvering and tightening his grip on Gotham politics, Moses may have been the one man in New York most in need of a cold beer.

Grub Street spotted a new beer, appropriately made by the Great South Bay Brewery on Long Island, that pays homage to the Robert Moses Causeway and its promise of breezy summer beaches. According to the brewery, the Robert Moses Pale Ale is a beer made for relaxing–hardly the image of Moses at work.

Famously, his nemesis Jane Jacobs was an unabashed beer drinker, frequenting the White Horse Tavern on Hudson Street where she fraternized with her Village neighbors. Could the act of clinking a cold one (or in Moses’ case, not) explain much of the difference between these icons of New York urbanism?

Filed Under: , ,

Rogers Marvel Secures Competition to Revamp White House Lawn Extension

East, Newsletter
Thursday, July 7, 2011
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Proposed changes to President's Park (Courtesy RMA)

Proposed changes to President's Park (Courtesy RMA)

Today, the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) announced that Rogers Marvel Architects (RMA) has won a design competition to revamp President’s Park in Washington, DC. The New York-based architects bested a distinguished list of landscape designers, including Hood Design Studio of Oakland California, Michael Van Valkenburgh of Brooklyn, and Reed Hildebrand Associates and SASAKI, both of Watertown, Massachusetts.

After September 11th, 2001, security design in major public spaces took on a new significance, and President’s Park South—a large ellipse forming a public extension of the White House’s front lawn—this meant concrete jersey barriers and fences along E Street. Soon, though, the park could become one of the most pedestrian-friendly—and secure—in the capital, thanks to RMA’s subtle combination of landscape architecture and security design.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York’s Standard Oil Building Gets New Life

East
Wednesday, July 6, 2011
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26 Broadway in Lower Manhattan

26 Broadway in Lower Manhattan

The landmarked Standard Oil Building at 26 Broadway continues to undergo its transformation from the oil giant’s Carrère and Hastings-designed New York headquarters into a bustling school building. Last week, AN got a sneak peek at the third academic institution to be completed there, a 104,000-square-foot space occupying the building’s first, mezzanine, and second levels. It will add 677 high school seats to the Broadway Education Campus, which currently includes The Urban Assembly School of Business for Young Women (on the 4th and 5th floors) and Lower Manhattan Community Middle School (on the 6th and 7th floors).

All three schools have been designed by John Ciardullo Associates Architects, who have worked extensively with the SCA over the past several decades. Perhaps that relationship is why Ciardullo was allowed to have a bit of fun with the campus.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> It’s Different at the Architecture League

East
Tuesday, July 5, 2011
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Aurora by Future Cities Lab

The Architectural League’s current exhibition offers a glimpse of where architecture is headed. It’s Different shows the work of the six winners of the Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers (formerly known as the Young Architect’s Forum). It’s a geographically diverse group working in a variety of formal veins. The six winners (with images!) are:

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Architecture in Uniform: Designing and Building for the Second World War

East
Friday, July 1, 2011
.
(Courtesy CCA)

(Courtesy CCA)

Architecture in Uniform: Designing and Building for the Second World War
Canadian Centre for Architecture
1920, rue Baile
Montréal, Québec, Canada
Through September 18

How did World War II impact the built environment? This new exhibit curated by Jean-Louis Cohen explores how 20th century architects contributed to the war efforts and how their work ultimately led to the modern structural and technological innovations that make some of today’s complex designs possible. WWII was an accelerator of technological innovation, and from 1937 to 1945 architects were frequently pressed to pursue the most modern solutions, which often meant the most cutting edge. Designed by New York-based WORKac, the exhibit is comprised of drawings, photographs, posters, books, publications, models, historical documents, and films that reveal how contemporary architecture left its mark on the landscapes of both the Axis and the Allied powers. Organized thematically, the exhibition focuses on wartime activity as well as architects and their projects in Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United States, and the USSR. Architecture in Uniform is part of a larger project at the CCA that examines the various roles of architecture from the Second World War to today called On the Natural History of Destruction.

Missed Muschamp

East
Tuesday, June 28, 2011
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Would Sheridan Square still be there if Moses got his way? Courtesy Flickr/adaptorplug

History happens in pubic space.  The election of Barack Obama brought crowds to 125th Street. Crowds formed at the World Trade Center on news of Osama Bin Laden’s death. Last Friday night it happened on Sheridan Square. In front of the Stonewall Inn, the crowd stood transfixed, staring into their iPhones, Blackberrries and other assorted digital devices. Several shouted out the numbers of state senators supporting gay marriage as it got closer and closer to the magic number: 32.  When I got there, there were shouts of 30 or 31. It was hard to tell really, it wasn’t a coordinated countdown, like the Time Square ball dropping. Some were still at 29 while others were at 31. It depended on whether you were on HuffPo or NYTimes. The whoops of the crowd came in waves, making it feel like the number 32 was reached several times.

Read More

Will Kimmelman Replace Ouroussoff at the Times?

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, June 28, 2011
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Michael Kimmelman (courtesy Wikipedia)

The Architect’s Newspaper has heard from multiple sources that the New York Times may be close to naming the art critic Michael Kimmelman as the paper’s new architecture critic. Outgoing architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff resurfaced today with another far flung report, a glowing review of Steven Holl’s Vanke Center in Shenzhen, China. Will it be his last? Though Kimmelman is best known as an art critic, he has written on architecture several times in recent years during his posting in Europe, including an excellent piece on David Chipperfield’s Neues Museum in Berlin and a profile of Peter Zumthor for the New York Times Magazine.
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