Pictorial> Loew’s King Theater in Brooklyn, Before

East, Newsletter
Thursday, August 11, 2011
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An old curtain falls within the proscenium. (AN/Stoelker)

There’s an old expression that perfectly describes the current condition of the Loew’s King movie palace on Flatbush Avenue: “regal rot.” There’s beauty in the decay, yet no one wants to see the the rot take the upper hand. At the moment the dank smell foretells the considerable work that lies ahead for the Houston-based ACE Theatrical Group, the developer selected by NYCEDC and Borough President Marty Markowitz to restore and operate the 1929 building.

Check out the gallery (and a video) after the jump.

Inverted Adjmi

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 9, 2011
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Looking down Lafayette at Adjmi's designs for the southwest corner of Great Jones Street. (Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects)

Morris Adjmi seems to be on something of an inversion kick as of late. His design proposal for a building on Walker Street, which was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) in June, used an inverted bas relief effect that made the concrete facade seem as though a cast iron building was pressed into a large piece of clay. The new proposal for the southwest corner of Lafayette and Great Jones Street uses a similar technique, but in aluminum sections. But at a public hearing on Tuesday LPC put the breaks on the Lafayette proposal, saying the architect needed more depth and detail. “In general, they asked for the addition of more variety, depth and articulation of the facade, particularly the long facade,” Landmarks spokesperson Elisabeth de Bourbon wrote in an email.

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On View> Talk to Me at MoMA

East
Monday, August 8, 2011
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Hello World!, Bernhard Hopfengärtner (Courtesy MoMA)

Hello World!, Bernhard Hopfengärtner (Courtesy MoMA)

Talk to Me
Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd St.
Through November 7

Talk to Me explores the subject of communication between people and their environment, highlighting the role of the designer in imagining and establishing these connections. Through a diverse selection of objects and conceptual work, the exhibition examines designs that engage users, including information systems, visualization design, communication devices, and interfaces, like the QR code mowed into a field in Bernhard Hopfengärtner’s project Hello World!, above.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Obit> Lauretta Vinciarelli, 1943-2011

East
Friday, August 5, 2011
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Lauretta Vinciarelli, Night #6, 1996; architectural drawing; watercolor and ink on paper. (Courtesy SFMOMA)

Lauretta Vinciarelli, an artist, architect, and professor, whose water color paintings were deeply rooted in architecture, died Thursday in New York City. In the forward to her book Not Architecture: But Evidence That It Exists Brooke Hodge wrote of how “Vinciarelli’s work shows, indeed, how inextricably bound together art and architecture are for her and should be for more of us.” Her art crossed borders architectural form and space with an interest in light. “The paintings are of spaces I know that look nothing like what I paint,” Vinciarelli told Hodge.

Continue reading after the jump.

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New York’s Summer Streets Begins This Weekend

East
Friday, August 5, 2011
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Summer Streets. (Courtesy Transportation Alternatives)

Summer Streets. (Courtesy Transportation Alternatives)

Beginning tomorrow, August 6 in New York City, grab your bike or jogging shoes and run out into traffic. Summer Streets, the program that shuts down a portion of the city’s thoroughfares to anything with a motor, is back for three weekends in August and the event is not to be missed. Described by Transportation Alternatives as “a cyclist’s dream, a pedestrian fantasy and most definitely New York City’s greatest car-free event,” there’s no exaggeration in saying you’ll never experience the city’s public spaces like strolling down the middle of Park Avenue without the dangers, sounds, or smells of the city’s notorious traffic.

Summer Streets will be barring autos from seven miles of Manhattan roads on August 6th, 13th, and 20th from 7:00a.m. until 1:00p.m., so wake up early and tell your friends!

Check out the route map after the jump.

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A Garden for Pondering in Philadelphia

East
Friday, August 5, 2011
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The Rodin Museum Garden with The Thinker beyond. (all images courtesy OLIN)

OLIN has completed a renovation of the gardens at Philadelphia’s Rodin Museum, which houses the largest collection of Auguste Rodin’s sculptures and objects outside of Paris. The renovation is a piece of a larger refurbishment of Benjamin Franklin Parkway, which is also being overseen by OLIN, as a part of the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s Master Plan.  Read More

Montgomery Monument Returns

East
Thursday, August 4, 2011
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ICR's senior conservator Amanda Trienens takes in the teams work. (AN/Stoelker)

Amidst the flurry of activity surrounding the World Trade Center another monument is nearing completion, though this one is not exactly brand new. By the end of this week restorers of the Montgomery Monument at Trinity’s St. Paul’s Chapel will be securing the last arrow tip and guttae to the nation’s first monument.

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LPC Approves Plans for Ol’ O’Toole

East
Tuesday, August 2, 2011
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The latest renderings show restored executive offices atop the building as well the cantilevered form below. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

The latest renderings show restored executive offices with the cantilevered form below. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

After a protracted land use review with vitriolic community meetings that disquieted even battle-hardened presenters, the Landmarks Preservation Commission finally approved plans by the Rudin development family and North Shore Long Island Jewish Medical to renovate the St. Vincent’s O’Toole building in Manhattan’s West Village. As of Tuesday, the former Maritime Union headquarters is set to become a comprehensive health care facility with emergency services.

Continue reading after the jump.

Risk Exposure: Public Space Loses Its Shirt on Wall Street

East
Tuesday, August 2, 2011
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Participants disrobe for Ocularpation: Wall Street. (Asa Gauen and Mike Kingsbaker)

Participants disrobe for Ocularpation: Wall Street. (Asa Gauen and Mike Kingsbaker)

At 7am on August 1, Genevieve White headed to work. Dressed like any personal trainer—zip-up track jacket, shorts, cross-trainers—she made her way down Wall Street. But White didn’t have an appointment to stand over a high-powered exec doing crunches. Bypassing the monumental entry of the neighborhood Equinox gym, she stationed herself on the sidewalk near William Street, stripped off her clothes, leaving on only her shoes and mirrored aviator sunglasses, and began doing jumping jacks.

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MAS(sive) Support

East
Monday, August 1, 2011
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Philanthropist Robert W. Wilson has gifted MAS with a $600,000 challenge grant

In an extended period of belt-tightening, it is often the arts sector that grapples with some of the harder aspects of fund-raising. With heavy competition from other non-profits clamoring for support from the city’s enlightened wealthy, institutions must be creative and resourceful to attract new and more generous donors. For the Municipal Art Society (MAS), this dedicated support has come in the form of Robert W. Wilson.

A veteran MAS donor, a philanthropist, and a former Wall Street hedge fund manager, Wilson has committed $600,000 over the next three years to match new or increased gifts of $1,000 or more on a one-for-two dollar basis. Effective August 1st, the aim is to help MAS strengthen and sustain its base of unrestricted support, which puts control of distribution into the hands of MAS rather than a targeted program.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Trouble with Eighth Street

East
Monday, August 1, 2011
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Eight Street businesses have seen better days.

Bohemian Eight Street has seen better days. (AN/Stoelker)

In his poem “One Winter Afternoon,” e.e. cummings describes Eighth Street in Greenwich Village at the “magical hour when is becomes if.” Well, it seems as though Eighth Street has reached that hour once again. The street, which once played a distinct role in Village bohemia, began as a hub for book dealers and fostered the original Whitney Museum. Eventually, the street became a district for shoe stores and edgy fashion anchored by Patricia Field. Field decamped for the Bowery about nine years ago and much of the street has since devolved into a hodgepodge of chain stores and characterless low-end retail.

Read More

School + Pool: Parsons Makes Waves with Splash House

East
Friday, July 29, 2011
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Design Workshop's Splash House at Highbridge Pool and Recreation Center.

Practice makes perfect, and for some Parsons students, the Splash House at Highbridge Pool and Recreation Center is a jumping off point for becoming better architects.

Parsons’ Design Workshop, a design-build studio set up 15 years ago to offer practical training to students, has partnered with New York Parks and Recreation Department to instigate a five-year initiative to identify and implement improvements in public spaces across the city. “The architecture students get a more holistic understanding of process,” said Kate McCormick, Press Officer at Parsons. “They actually learn how to make and engage the community, by finding out what it needs.” Although it usually collaborates with public organizations both inside and outside Manhattan, this is the Workshop’s first long-term municipal partnership within New York City. The first assignment: Highbridge Pool and Recreation Center in Upper Manhattan. Read More

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