Inside the Archtober Building of the Day #25: Alice Tully Hall at Julliard

East
Wednesday, October 26, 2011
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Detail of stage at Alice Tully Hall (Courtesy FX Fowle)

Detail of stage at Alice Tully Hall (Courtesy FX Fowle)

Rather than add a few hundred more words to the tens of thousands already devoted to praise the Diller Scofidio + Renfro / FXFOWLE renovation of the Julliard School and Alice Tully Hall, I think today that I will remember the original architect, Pietro Belluschi (1899-1994). As a young faculty member at the University of Virginia, I got to know his work a bit. He designed the UVA School of Architecture. The building was muscular, had clear structure, and well expressed the late 1960s/early ‘70s last gasps of Brutalism.

Continue reading after the jump.

Inside Archtober “Building” of the Day #24: Subway Vent Benches

East
Monday, October 24, 2011
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An MTA flood mitigation filter in Queens. (Courtesy Laura Ann Trimble/Center for Architecture)

An MTA flood mitigation filter in Queens. (Courtesy Laura Ann Trimble/Center for Architecture)

Even though Hurricane Irene blew through on August 27th without flooding the subways, which were rendered prophylactically still and silent for a day, a pesky summer storm in 2007 dumped so much water onto the M and R lines that they were forced out of service. Governor Spitzer took immediate action to mitigate the problem, and boldly mobilized the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Department of Transportation to do something about it. Solving a range of engineering problems while at the same time providing a streetscape element with some wit and whimsy, Rogers Marvel Architects created banks of raised stainless steel grates that rise up into an undulating wave of slats and hammered speckled side walls.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels, WSJ Architecture Innovator of the Year

East
Monday, October 24, 2011
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BIG's concept for the expansion of the National Beaux-Arts Museum in Quebec. (Courtesy BIG)

BIG's concept for the expansion of the National Beaux-Arts Museum in Quebec. (Courtesy BIG)

If Bjarke Ingels‘ ascension into starchitecture hasn’t been dramatic enough, the Danish architect is again moving up in the world. On Friday, Ingels’ firm BIG threw a party to christen their new office space in Manhattan. BIG has expanded its Chelsea presence, moving up from the third to the twelfth floor of the Starrett-Lehigh Building. A press preview of the new space preceded the party a couple floors above. Among those in attendance were Crown Prince Frederik and Princess Mary of Denmark, who earlier this month awarded Ingels the $90,000 Culture Prize—the MacArthur of Scandinavia—for his emerging work in architecture.

Now it looks like Ingels’ October has just been getting started. The Wall Street Journal Magazine will declare the Danish architect among its inaugural Innovators of the Year. Read More

Zaha the Lioness

East
Friday, October 21, 2011
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The 2011 Architecture and Design Film Festival

The 2011 Architecture and Design Film Festival. (The Architect's Newspaper)

It felt a bit like the Decoration & Design Building at the Architecture and Design Film Festival last night for the U.S. premiere of Lioness Among Lions: The Architect Zaha Hadid, thanks in part to a smattering of East Side stylings in the crowd at the Tribeca Cinemas and the clever addition of Potterton Books to the festival. Waiting for the theater doors to open, we swigged wine provided by event sponsor Resource Furniture and perused shelves filled with a fantastic collection  of both old and new books; Loos and Gio Ponti pressed up against Studio Gang. As we raved about Van Alen’s new bookstore, Potterton’s book buyer Beth Daugherty admitted she still mourns the loss of Urban Center Books.

Continue reading after the jump.

Inside the Archtober Building of the Day #20: 41 Cooper Square

East
Thursday, October 20, 2011
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41 Cooper Square by Thom Mayne. (Brandon Thomas / Flickr)

41 Cooper Square by Thom Mayne. (Brandon Thomas / Flickr)

Building of the Day #20: 41 Cooper Square
The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art
New York, NY

Often “stats” and awards are known well before the public appreciates a new building’s urban role. Cooper Union’s 41 Cooper Square, designed by Thom Mayne, FAIA, of Morphosis Architects with Gruzen Samton as Associate Architect, is more than a volume for a multi-disciplinary academic building with a co-generation plant, cooling and heating ceiling panels, low V.O.C. materials, green terraces, and “Fit-City”-worthy vertical circulation. While these stats did help the client claim the first LEED Platinum-certified academic laboratory building, Cooper has also revived a former traffic triangle and extended its identity southwards along the new Bowery. At a time when both NYU and Columbia’s building goals face sharp scrutiny, it pays to have a tough skin. Make that a gritty double skin!

Continue reading after the jump.

Public Architecture, Conversations on Design and Public Impact

East
Thursday, October 20, 2011
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Left to right: Jess Zimbabwe, Jair Lynch, Frank Giblin, Gabriel Kroiz. (Amanda Hurley)

Left to right: Jess Zimbabwe, Jair Lynch, Frank Giblin, Gabriel Kroiz. (Amanda Kolson Hurley)

Last night, the Woolly Mammoth theater in downtown Washington, D.C. hosted a forum on design’s potential to affect social change, organized by the San Francisco nonprofit Public Architecture and sponsored by Teknion. Attendees filed into a rehearsal hall to hear four speakers from the public and private sectors who are using design to effect change on different scales.

Continue reading after the jump.

Inside the Archtober Building of the Day #19: East Harlem School

East
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
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East Harlem School by Peter Gluk and Partners. (Coutesy Peter Gluk and Partners)

A rainy day couldn’t dampen the spirits of the fourth graders that we met playing hoops in the brightly lit gym of the East Harlem School. It looks to me that there are two geniuses behind this wonderful building: Peter Gluck, the acerbic and seasoned architect/builder and Ivan M. Hageman, co-founder and Head of School.

Gluck led the tour, but Ivan was ever-present—in the cafeteria leading an appreciation of the chef and servers, and in the reception area meeting with parents. He welcomed us into his office, which is perched at the east end of the building with a clear glass open view up 103rd Street to the Public School embedded in the nearby housing project. Jane Jacobs eyes on the street.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Detroit Disassembled, Photographs by Andrew Moore

East, Midwest
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
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Facade, Michigan Central Station, 2009. (Andrew Moore)

Facade, Michigan Central Station, 2009. (Andrew Moore)

Detroit Disassembled:
Photographs by Andrew Moore

Queens Museum of Art
Flushing Meadows Corona Park
Queens, NY
Through January15

The Queens Museum of Art (QMA) presents the powerful photography of Andrew Moore from his three-month visit to Detroit from 2008 to 2009. Moore’s photographs are a tragic yet beautiful glimpse into the decline of a city that was once the twentieth century industrial heart of America. Michigan Central Station (above) stands empty, the organ screen at the United Artists Theater is crumbling, and bright green moss covers the floor of the former Ford Motor Company Headquarters. “Moore’s exquisitely realized visions of architecture overtaken by vegetation remind contemporary viewers that our own familiar culture is subject to the forces of entropy and the eternal strength of nature,” says a statement from QMA.

More photos after the jump.

Inside the Archtober Building of the Day #18: 200 Fifth Avenue

East
Tuesday, October 18, 2011
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200 Fifth Avenue. (Cynthia Kracauer/Center for Architecture)

200 Fifth Avenue. (Cynthia Kracauer/Center for Architecture)

Building of the Day #18: 200 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY

Beautiful weather continues to make Archtober the best month ever to enjoy great architecture. Madison Square, where 200 Fifth Avenue is located, is a palimpsest of the northward expansion of commerce and civilization in Manhattan. A public space since 1686, it first became a park in 1847. With the construction of the Fifth Avenue Hotel, (Griffith Thomas with William Washburn Architects, 1859) on the site of the current 200 Fifth, the area became the social, cultural, and political hub of elite New York in the years after the Civil War—think Edith Wharton. And it has the monuments to prove it.

More after the jump.

55 Warren: One Scoop with Glitz on Top

East
Tuesday, October 18, 2011
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Courtesy Leopoldo Rosati

A view up from the courtyard at 55 Warren, designed by OCV Architects and interior designer Leopold Rosati. (Courtesy Leopoldo Rosati)

Last week, we took a trip around the block from the AN office to go to an open house at 55 Warren hosted by Legrand, the French systems management company. While we were impressed with all the gizmos and glitzy gadgets, it was OCV Architect’s clever renovation of the old cast-iron building that grabbed our attention.

Check out the photos after the jump.

On View> Cooper-Hewitt on Designing Lasting Solutions with the Other 90%

East
Monday, October 17, 2011
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Favela Painting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Courtesy Haas&Hahn)

Favela Painting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Courtesy Haas&Hahn)

For a long time in the West there has been a common misgiving that aid is about patronage. The Cooper Hewitt’s latest exhibition, Design with the Other 90% : Cities, which opened this weekend at the United Nations Visitor’s Center, rebukes this notion by spotlighting communities in the southern hemisphere who are taking the initiative, harnessing local resources to solve their own problems. In the show, designers and architects are tapping into existing currents of change.

Continue reading after the jump.

FLW Double Header! Experience Fallingwater at the Guggenheim

East, Midwest
Monday, October 17, 2011
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Attention Frank Lloyd Wright fans! You can satisfy two Wright cravings with this one event. Head over the the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum to catch a screening of Kenneth Love’s lush new documentary Fallingwater: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Masterwork with Reflections of Edgar Kaufmann Jr. The film, which was supported by the James Marston Fitch Charitable Foundation, the Estate of Edgar Tafel, and the Laurel Foundation, will be screened in the museum’s New Media Theatre on October 21 and 28 and November 4 and 18 at 1:00 and 3:00 pm. The screenings are free with the price of admission to the museum. It’s the perfect marriage of content and container. Wright would approve.

Watch the video after the jump.

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