Did Boston’s Millennium Tower Break a “Record” With Its 36-Hour Concrete Pour?

Boston's Millennium Tower. (Courtesy Handel Architects)

Boston’s Millennium Tower. (Courtesy Handel Architects)

After a continuous 36-hour concrete pour last weekend, Boston’s Millennium Tower is ready to rise above the city skyline. The day-and-a-half-long pour of 6,000 cubic yards for the Handel Architects–designed project is being called a “record concrete pour” by local press—and it probably is, at least in terms of hours spent pouring. But if you crunch the numbers, as AN did, the pour in Beantown reveals that the tower’s concrete took its sweet, sweet time to flow. We’ll explain.

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New York Affordable Housing Experts Weigh In on De Blasio’s Pending Housing Plan

Development, East
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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Aerial view of New York City. (Flickr /  Katy Silberger)

Aerial view of New York City. (Flickr / Katy Silberger)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has been promising to “preserve or construct” nearly 200,000 units of affordable housing since his days as the most unlikely of mayoral contenders. Since stepping into City Hall, the mayor has repeated that pledge nearly every chance he gets. But while the affordable housing plan is one of his central policy issues, it’s still not clear how the city can hit the mayor’s magic number. That should change this week when de Blasio’s housing team releases their detailed plan of action. Before that plan is released, however, AN asked some of the city’s leading architects, advocates, and planners what they hope to see in the team’s path forward.

Continue reading after the jump.

Obit> Fred Schwartz, 1951–2014

East, Obit
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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Fred Schwartz looks toward the New Jersey 9/11 memorial, Empty Sky, from the documentary, The Art of Memories. (Courtesy The Art of Memories)

Fred Schwartz looks toward the New Jersey 9/11 memorial, Empty Sky, from the documentary, The Art of Memories. (Courtesy The Art of Memories)

We heard this morning that Fred Schwartz—one of the most independent, passionate, and even fearless voices in the New York architecture world—passed away last night. Frederic Schwartz Architects was well known for its waterfront park planning and various 9/11 memorials (Fred died at 9:11p.m. last night).

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Long Island College Hospital Could Get The Residential Tower Treatment [UPDATED]

Long Island College Hospital. (Flickr / Chris Morgan)

Long Island College Hospital. (Flickr / Chris Morgan)

After a long and heated fight to save Brooklyn’s Long Island College Hospital from demolition, the site’s future as a medical center has been cemented. But along with the full-service hospital could come two residential towers that are significantly taller than anything in the predominantly-brownstone Cobble Hill neighborhood.

Just how high could the towers rise?

Storefront for Art and Architecture to Unveil “Letters to the Mayor” Next Week

Art, East, On View
Friday, April 25, 2014
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An exhibit in the project. (Courtesy  Elena Palacios Carral, Manijeh Verghese, Storefront for Art and Architectur)

An exhibit in the project. (Courtesy Elena Palacios Carral, Manijeh Verghese, Storefront for Art and Architectur)

The Storefront for Art and Architecture will unveil its new exhibit, Letters to the Mayor, this Tuesday, April 29th. According to Storefront, “Letters to the Mayor presents fifty letters written by international architects to the political leaders of more than 20 cities around the world. Each letter provides a space of reflection for the architect to present ideas and methodologies and express some of the concerns and desires that might contribute to action within political spheres.”

At the opening, Storefront will announce the winners of its “Competition of Competitions,” which invited interdisciplinary teams to “formulate their visions of the future of architecture and cities in the form of a competition brief.” For more on the competition and the exhibit visit storefrontnews.org.

On View> Allan Wexler’s New York Exhibition Explores Landscape Interventions

Art, East, On View
Friday, April 25, 2014
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Bridge, 2014. (Allan Wexler)

Bridge, 2014. (Allan Wexler)

Allan Wexler: Breaking Ground
Ronald Feldman Fine Arts
31 Mercer Street, New York
Through May 3, 2014

The current Allan Wexler exhibit, Breaking Ground, at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts proves again how important is the work of architects who confine their production to the gallery. In the new exhibit, Wexler explores mankind’s first interventions into landscape with a series of photo-based images and sculpture. Wexler first builds models of his imagined landscapes out of plaster and museum board before photographing them and digitally manipulating and printing them. The Architect’s Newspaper will celebrate Wexler’s extraordinary forty five year career with a special reception at the Feldman gallery Tuesday, April, 29th from 6:00–8:00p.m.

Continue reading after the jump.

Inaugural Isamu Noguchi Awards Go To Norman Foster & Hiroshi Sugimoto

Norman Foster. (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Norman Foster. (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

This week, the Noguchi Museum in Queens, New York announced the inaugural Isamu Noguchi Awards to recognize like-minded spirits who share Noguchi’s commitment to innovation, global consciousness, and Japanese/American exchange. The first recipients of the award are architects Norman Foster and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

 

 

Continue reading after the jump.

Amid Horse Carriage Debate, Nostalgic New Yorkers Ponder a 21st Century Horseless Carriage

Design, East, News, Transportation
Thursday, April 24, 2014
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The Horseless eCarriage. (Henry Melcher / AN)

The Horseless eCarriage. (Henry Melcher / AN)

In what sounds like a flashback to the turn of the 20th century, curious New Yorkers peered inquisitively at a new horseless carriage model on display at the New York International Auto Show. The old-timey vehicle is actually a high-tech electric vehicle at the center of the heated fight to ban horse carriages from Central Park in New York City.

Continue reading after the jump.

Michael Kimmelman Proposes A Queens-Brooklyn Waterfront Streetcar

The proposed streetcar route. (Courtesy New York Times)

The proposed streetcar route. (Courtesy New York Times)

As development along the Brooklyn and Queens’ waterfront has increased dramatically over the years, transportation options—for residents old and new—has not. The number of glass towers, startups, and parks along the East River has only been matched by style pieces on new “it” neighborhoods from Astoria to Red Hook. But, now, the New York Times’ Michael Kimmelman has used his platform to launch a plan to change that equation, and give these neighborhoods the transportation system they deserve.

Continue reading after the jump.

Letter to the Editor> Health Food and Historic Preservation

The Coignet Building in Gowanus, Brooklyn is believed to be the first concrete building in New York City. (David Gallagher / Flickr)

The Coignet Building in Gowanus, Brooklyn is believed to be the first concrete building in New York City. (David Gallagher / Flickr)

[Editor's Note: The following are reader-submitted responses to a pair of articles about the opening of an urban Whole Foods in Gowanus, Brooklyn, “Suburbs Meet City” (AN 03_03.05.2014), and the pending redevelopment of the Coignet Building on the site, “Set in Stone” (AN 03_03.05.2014). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

Thanks for the article (“Suburbs Meet CityAN 03_03.05.2014). About the note at the end referring to the project’s intent—is it possible that what could be a corporate marketing ploy on the front end positively contributes to a vibrant local culture? If consumers keep demanding this type of sensitive response from national corporations, I hope with time this business strategy evolves and matures from just local products and signs that say “Brooklyn” all the way to careful stewardship of a community, i.e. good use of the Coignet Building, etc. Thanks again.

Chris Hoal
Intern Architect
Gresham Smith & Partners

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Second “Arterial Slow Zone” Arrives in the Bronx

DOT Commisioner Polly Trottenberg at the announcement. ( Flickr / NYCSTREETS)

DOT Commisioner Polly Trottenberg at the announcement. ( Flickr / NYCSTREETS)

Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero is coming to another dangerous New York City corridor. NYC Department of Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg and city officials announced that the Grand Concourse in the Bronx will become the second of the city’s 25 planned “arterial slow zones.” The speed limit on more than five miles of the busy road will be lowered to 25-miles-per-hour, and traffic signals will be retimed to protect pedestrians. The announcement comes weeks after an eight-mile stretch of Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn and Queens was given the same treatment.

Architects Propose Parametric “Urban Alloy Towers” Bridging a Train Yard in Queens

The Urban Alloy Towers. (Courtesy AMLGM)

The Urban Alloy Towers. (Courtesy AMLGM)

Why cap a transit hub with traditional, mixed-use towers when it can be topped by an amorphous, alien-like, tubular, metallic structurethat seemingly defies gravity? That, apparently, was the thinking behind AMLGM’s “Urban Alloy” proposal for Queens, New York. Their dramatic proposal, which bends and twists above an existing transportation center, includes retail, office, cultural, and residential space within its metallic skin.

More after the jump.

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